#1
Hi guys!

I need some advice so if anobody can help PLEASE PLEASE do so.

I have started to practice identifying intervals, not practiced so long yet but (1 hour).
But I noticed that when I listen to a song I can hear the first interval for example Stairway to heaven is Perfect Unison and then m3 after that. But after m3 I can't figure out the next interval, it's like my brain cant make the m3 into a Perfect Unison so I can identify the next (the third) interval in the song. I always have to pause the song so I can hear the interval after m3. So it's like I can only figure it out by going Perfect Unison > Next interval >Perfect Unison > Next interval but is it possible to learn to identify in one row like P1>m3>m3>M2.

As you see my problem is I can only identify by making every note a Perfect Unison to figure out the next (Damn I hope I didnt confuse you guys too much) And by the way how the hell do people identify the intervals for example in Shred solos, it goes so fast I cant keep up at all.

Well thanks in advance guys!

Learning intervals is fun! I associate them with songs like m1 = The Shark attacking thing M2 = Silent Night m3 = Greensleeves. Is that a good way to learn them?

-NoteNinja
#2
That is a good way to learn, yeah. another thing.. Intervals are really easy when you learn to group them as consonant (3rds and 6ths) dissonant (2nds and 7ths) and perfect (4ths and 5ths)

about identifying intervals when working out songs.. I don't really think about it too much to be honest, you just kind of figure it out after a bit of practice.
#3
Thats a great way to learn them. Another idea would be to isolate and practice playing the intervals you are having trouble with, over and over, then alternate the known ones, with the ones you dont know as well, and see if that helps. You'll gradually build the distinction between your perfects for example and your b5/+4
#5
Thanks for the help guys but I dont get it, how do I hear P1>m3>M2 between m3 to M2 exacly after P1. I can only do it by stopping the song and make m3 a P1 to figure out the M2.

So the thing is.
Now im gonna figure out that M2

P1>m3>M2 Can't do.it like that.

P1>m3(transform m3 to P1)>M2 I can do it like this.

I would like to be able to figure it out without the need to make m3 to a P1.
Maybe you guys answered the question but maybe I didnt understand where the answer was sorry if that's the case.

I need another explanation please

-NoteNinja
#6
Quote by NoteNinja
Thanks for the help guys but I dont get it, how do I hear P1>m3>M2 between m3 to M2 exacly after P1. I can only do it by stopping the song and make m3 a P1 to figure out the M2.

So the thing is.
Now im gonna figure out that M2

P1>m3>M2 Can't do.it like that.

P1>m3(transform m3 to P1)>M2 I can do it like this.

I would like to be able to figure it out without the need to make m3 to a P1.
Maybe you guys answered the question but maybe I didnt understand where the answer was sorry if that's the case.

I need another explanation please

-NoteNinja


It sounds like youre trying to identify multiple intervals at once?

You should be proficient at one interval at a time all over before trying to identify stacks, and I would suggest that you learn them in pairs and not clusters. When you refer to a p1 - you only need to call it a unison if you are playing the exact same pitch somewhere else or one after the other. Two of the same pitch is a unison. So call it a root, maybe for simplicities sake?

Id focus on the difference between major 3rds and minor thirds to start with and get really good at those. In chords you are usually dealing wirh 3rds, either major or minor. Get really strong with this.


It sounds like you are trying to identify all intervals in a chord solely by their distance to the root, which you never want to change

So for example, if G were our root and we had a G major chord, youd want G to the 5th G to the octave and G to the etc... and to identify by ear, their intervals in relationship to the G alone, is that right?
Last edited by Sean0913 at Dec 10, 2009,
#7
Nah not multiple like in a chord. Multiple like in a melody. You must understand that I associate intervals with songs. Let's take Led Zeppelins Stairway to heaven again.
P1>m3>?? (if I'm right) I hear it as the start of the song Greensleeves which is P1>m3 BUT when I come to the next interval after m3 being "??" P1>m3>?? I cant hear it directly after the m3. That's my problem. I can only identify the next interval by starting with a Perfect Unison, and not P1>m3(after this one).

Thanks for helping guys! I hope you understand what I mean this time so I dont confuse you way too much.

Edit:

This is how Stairway to heaven goes P1>m3>m3.
I hear it like start of greensleeves and then I cant go further between the m3>m3 even though in theory its the same as P1>m3. I don't hear m3>m3 as Greensleeves even though it's the same interval distance. That's my problem.
Last edited by NoteNinja at Dec 10, 2009,
#8
Well it looks like you are looking for a way to learn intervals by associating them with songs that you are already familiar with, as a shortcut or aid to learning intervals, if I understand correctly.

If you think that's what will get you there, have at it:

http://www.trainear.com/Interval_Song_Associations_Interval_Songs_Song_Hints_23_2009.php
#9
Quote by Sean0913
Well it looks like you are looking for a way to learn intervals by associating them with songs that you are already familiar with, as a shortcut or aid to learning intervals, if I understand correctly.

If you think that's what will get you there, have at it:

http://www.trainear.com/Interval_Song_Associations_Interval_Songs_Song_Hints_23_2009.php


Ok thanks guys!
I give up. There is no way in hell I can explain this any better :P I'll just practice the intervals like mad and probably figure it out myself in some way.

Peace!