#1
Before you tell me to go the the how to string a guitar thread my question is related and not in the thread.

Today i realized that the reason why my les paul feels so much different than my SG with the same scale and bridge is because when i strung the SG last time, i, on the advice from someone who may have been wrong, threaded the strings into the tailpiece/bridge (im not exactly sure what you call the removable piece on the bottom of most les pauls and SGs( backwards, so basically they loop around and sit on top of it before going up the guitar

is there are positive or negative affect of doing this? It seemed to add more stability to the strings but is it dangerous for my guitar?
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#2
I've seen quite a few people do this in order to get more bass, more sustain, or a more positive connection between the strings and bridge. So long as you have enough string left at the tuners, it should be fine.
#3
hmm sounds like it would be something i might want to do. seems like the SG stayed in tune better too maybe it helps that? thanks though man

anyone have any bad experiences doing this? ha
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First of all, I enjoy deathcore for it's complexity and it's the only genre heavy enough for me



Quote by Highway60Bob
I want an amp good for playing hippie tunes. I want it to be an actual amp, not a tube amp.
#4
I took my SG into a luthier and it came back like that,so I've strung it like that since.
appartently it reduces the angle that the strings make over the bridge,thus reducing string stress.
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#5
If you're looping it around the bridge rather than straight through, you get a little bit less tension on the strings, which some people love. It's just preference. It won't damage anything and if you like it, go for it.
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#6
All it really does is raise the height of the strings at the stopbar, reducing the 'break angle' over the bridge saddles. You might as well just raise the height of the stopbar - it's really more of a visual choice if you want to wrap the strings back and over the stopbar or thread them through normally and raise the stopbar.
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#7
That is very interesting... so you would string it like a guitar that had the bridge/tail piece as one thing. I never thought to do that. I don't think that I would ever do that, but it's interesting none the less.

Anyway the answer to your question is, yes that would definitely make the whole thing "feel" different. Are you having any issues with the strings popping out the saddles? It seems that could be a problem without a strong enough angle.
#8
nah the issue im having is the strings feel much looser on my les paul than on my SG and they are the same gauge and same scale. Also my low C goes sharp when i play really hard and this never happened on my SG
Quote by shakin'cakes
First of all, I enjoy deathcore for it's complexity and it's the only genre heavy enough for me



Quote by Highway60Bob
I want an amp good for playing hippie tunes. I want it to be an actual amp, not a tube amp.
#9
it's called top wrapping, i always do it because it reduces the angle from the stopbar to the T-O-M therefor the strings snap lesz easily
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