#1
Hi. I'm an intermediate guitarist, steadily moving on to more advanced stuff. Since I don't know the first thing about music theory I've decided it's about time I did. Problem is I don't know where to start. Any good books? Sites? (or give me a link to a thread that might give me more insight). Also, how does theory work regarding instruments? Is it studied as 'music theory' as a whole subject? Or would I be learning 'guitar theory'. Appreciate any input because as I mentioned, I don't know where to start. Thanks guys.
#3
Music theory is fundamentally the same for all instruments.

All [modern] instruments have the same set of 12 notes (in various octaves) and the same system of scales, that's why bands with lots of different instruments can play together. C# is the same note whether it's on a guitar a piano or trombone.

There are some bits of theory that are more relevant to some instruments and musical styles however. Chord construction and voicing for example is less relevant on wind instruments which can only play a single note at a time and modes are rarely used in mainstream rock music.

In other words - Music theory is independent of instrument but some bits will be more/less useful depending on which instrument(s) you play.
#4
Quote by doive
Music theory is fundamentally the same for all instruments.

All [modern] instruments have the same set of 12 notes (in various octaves) and the same system of scales, that's why bands with lots of different instruments can play together. C# is the same note whether it's on a guitar a piano or trombone.

There are some bits of theory that are more relevant to some instruments and musical styles however. Chord construction and voicing for example is less relevant on wind instruments which can only play a single note at a time and modes are rarely used in mainstream rock music.

In other words - Music theory is independent of instrument but some bits will be more/less useful depending on which instrument(s) you play.

For the most part this post is correct, just know that some instruments are in different keys. For example, the clarinet is in Bb, so a written C would sound like a Bb.
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#6
Many thanks for the replies guys. Appreciate the links - can't wait to get started but as I mentioned before, haven't a clue where to start. But I do now. So thanks!
#8
a tentative theory about the natural world; a concept that is not yet verified but that if true would explain certain facts or phenomena; "a scientific hypothesis that survives experimental testing becomes a scientific theory"; "he proposed a fresh theory of alkalis that later was accepted in chemical practices"
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#9
start with power chords


Why? Because this is likely one of the first things you learn on guitar. So as a starting point for theory, it makes some sense to begin here as well.

We all know the 2 string power chord shape (over one string, up two frets)

-----------------
-----------------
------------5----
--------3--------

Understanding the how and why behind this shape makes for a good starting point and lets you go into more advanced theory in the same order you learned skills on the guitar.

I can throw together something on this if there is any interest.
Last edited by fx303 at Dec 19, 2009,