#1
If you're playing in C# Major and add an A Major into the progression, what are you doing musically?
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#2
Well for starters you really wouldn't call it C# Major because it just has so many sharps it reads funny, it would be Db major.

As for an A major chord added to the key you're just raising you're V chord up a semitone. I guess it would be looked at as an accidental.

Does the music modulate after the A major chord? It's possible that it modulates to the key of A major after this.
Last edited by Zanon at Dec 10, 2009,
#3
It's in the breakdown of that crappy new Greenday song. As much as I hate them, I'm interested in the progression.

Happens at around 3:56 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4ZKlT1EvCA
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#4
Well they're all power chords so there's no real harmony implied.

I'm guessing that they just added that chord in because it sounds kind of out and that it shouldn't quite be there, it's used to restart the riff again
#5
Right, so it's just because of how it sounds. Thanks.
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#6
Quote by Zanon
Well for starters you really wouldn't call it C# Major because it just has so many sharps it reads funny, it would be Db major.

As for an A major chord added to the key you're just raising you're V chord up a semitone. I guess it would be looked at as an accidental.

Does the music modulate after the A major chord? It's possible that it modulates to the key of A major after this.


C♯ major is a key, and you can call it that. It has seven sharps, but thats not too many...

The A would be a ♭VI, which is borrowed from the parrallel minor.

C♯ is actually simpler in this case than D♭ since in D♭ the ♭VI is a B♭♭.
#7
Quote by isaac_bandits
C♯ major is a key, and you can call it that. It has seven sharps, but thats not too many...

The A would be a ♭VI, which is borrowed from the parrallel minor.

C♯ is actually simpler in this case than D♭ since in D♭ the ♭VI is a B♭♭.
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#8
Quote by isaac_bandits
C♯ major is a key, and you can call it that. It has seven sharps, but thats not too many...

The A would be a ♭VI, which is borrowed from the parrallel minor.

C♯ is actually simpler in this case than D♭ since in D♭ the ♭VI is a B♭♭.


Would it not be easier to read 5 flats than 7 sharps?
#10
Quote by Calibos
Would it not be easier to read 5 flats than 7 sharps?


Reading 7 sharps is easier because all the notes lie on the same lines/spaces as in C major, just raised a half step. It's easier for me to think that way.
#11
Quote by timeconsumer09
Reading 7 sharps is easier because all the notes lie on the same lines/spaces as in C major, just raised a half step. It's easier for me to think that way.


I think the clear answer here is that it's really personal preference.

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#12
Quote by zapparage
If you're playing in C# Major and add an A Major into the progression, what are you doing musically?


Well, lets put this in a more accessible key so we don't have to argue over silly things like what you should call the key.


So, for example your in C Major, and you add an Ab major to the progression....


VI chord borrowed from the parallel minor.

^ I believe this is the answer to your question.


EDIT:

I didn't realize it was already mentioned....

Quote by JAZZ_MAN919
i think this is what your after.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borrowed_chord



^ good call
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Dec 11, 2009,
#13
Quote by Calibos
Would it not be easier to read 5 flats than 7 sharps?


Since the song borrows from the parallel minor, I'd say its easier to read seven sharps borrowing from four sharps, rather than five flats borrowing from eight flats. It really is preference though.
#14
Quote by isaac_bandits
Since the song borrows from the parallel minor, I'd say its easier to read seven sharps borrowing from four sharps, rather than five flats borrowing from eight flats. It really is preference though.

It is preference, but in all my years of playing (mainly orchestral) music, I've never seen something written a key which has a simpler enharmonic equivalent but I have seen lots of double sharps/flats.

If you put it in C# just for the Bbb chord then you are putting in 2 extra accidentals into the key signature just for the sake of one double flat, which doesn't really seem worth it.
#15
Quote by 12345abcd3
It is preference, but in all my years of playing (mainly orchestral) music, I've never seen something written a key which has a simpler enharmonic equivalent but I have seen lots of double sharps/flats.

If you put it in C# just for the Bbb chord then you are putting in 2 extra accidentals into the key signature just for the sake of one double flat, which doesn't really seem worth it.


Really it is personal preference. I've seen songs written in C♯ major, and I've seen them in D♭ major. Depending on what modulations there are, and what transposing instruments are playing, certain ones work better. I didn't listen to the whole song, so I can't conclusively say that one is better than the other.