#1
I have so many questions. So I decided just to keep a window up all day while i'm looking at basses and write down each one I get.

1) What does it mean when a bass is "body binding"? what about headstock binding? and neck binding?
2) What's the inlay? Is it the frets?
3) What does it mean for a set of strings to be, for example, 45-105?
4) What is power slinky and all the other tons of strings? I can only guess that you use each type for playing a certain type of music.
5) What's it mean for a bass to have a bolt on construction versus a neck through construction? I have an idea, but I would like confirmation.
6) What is the "nut"?
7) Does Gibson own Epiphone?
8) What's a bone nut? sounds dirty.
9) I know what hardware is when it comes to skateboards, but what's bass hardware consist of?
10) What are round wound strings?
11) Does EQ still mean equalizer in this world?

I may have more later, but i'm kind of tired and am going to sleep through Algebra now. Peace and thanks

EDIT: What does it mean to be GASing for something? maybe to be working towards getting it?

EDIT 2: 1) What is a compressor? 2) how do those effect pedals work? 3) what is a string-thru body? 4) What is a hum-cancelling pickup? and what's a humbucking pickup?
Quote by COBHC1
I lol'd

First lol row
Quote by bloodtrocuted93
They will be twin boys named God and Satan and I will make them fight each other.

http://www.virtual-bubblewrap.com/index.shtml
Quote by sg255
If I cross the street to get away from them, then it's a latino.
Last edited by FrankieHCO at Dec 10, 2009,
#2
1. binding is a (usually) plastic aesthetic that goes around the body/headstock/neck on the very edge, or corner of the guitar.

2. inlay is a decoration between the frets, most commonly a dot or diamond.

3. the numbers you see are the string gauges, from low to high. so the high string would be .45 of an inch, the lowest string would be .105 of an inch. you can change this depending on your preference of string and how you set up the guitar.

4. strings again are your personal preference. you wont hear a sound difference unless you have well trained ears, but each string company has their own way of going about making them.

5. bolt on means the neck is literally bolted to the body, this is the most common and cheapest way to have a guitar put together. also allows for easy neck swaps. neck thru means the neck is one solid piece of wood, running from the headstock all the way to the back of the body. this means the body is two seperate pieces then. think of the body as "wings" on the neck.

6. the nut is the place on the headstock, right before the first fret, where the stings sit in. the denser the nut material, the more energy transfer, the more sustain. you dont want a plastic nut.

7. actually, epiphone was started before gibson, but now that is basically what has happened. epiphone is licensed to produce gibson models at a lesser price, of course with lesser materials and workmanship. dont get me wrong though, you can get some ballin' epi's

8. like i said before, bone is a dense material, and that would beat the hell out of having a plastic nut

9. hardware would be knobs, switches, could include electronics

10. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strings_%28music%29

11. when has EQ NOT meant equalizer?
Quote by evening_crow
As far as i know the only liquor that should not be stored after opened is wine, and even then it's mainly the french one. American wine usually has conservatives in it to stop this.
#3
Quote by htsktim91989

9. hardware would be knobs, switches, could include electronics

Hardware also includes the tuners and other stuff, for instance, with floating tremolos, the springs, even though I haven't heard of a bass having one... is the bridge also considered hardware?
Gear:

Guitars: Ibanez SV5470F, Ibanez Xpt700, Fender MIM Standard Stratocaster ('04-'05), Jackson Ps-2
Ashton AG200,
Amps: ENGL E530, Bugera 6262-212,
FX: TC Electronics G-major 2, Behringer EQ700, Morley Volume / Wah
#4
^ yes the bridge is indeed hardware.
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#5
Quote by The^Unforgiven
, with floating tremolos, the springs, even though I haven't heard of a bass having one... is the bridge also considered hardware?



If it's "chrome hardware", then the bridge will be chrome coloured.

Ibanez SR506BM
Ashdown Little Giant 1000w
Peavey TVX 115+410
A big ass upright

#6
Quote by htsktim91989
1. binding is a (usually) plastic aesthetic that goes around the body/headstock/neck on the very edge, or corner of the guitar.

2. inlay is a decoration between the frets, most commonly a dot or diamond.

3. the numbers you see are the string gauges, from low to high. so the high string would be .45 of an inch, the lowest string would be .105 of an inch. you can change this depending on your preference of string and how you set up the guitar.

4. strings again are your personal preference. you wont hear a sound difference unless you have well trained ears, but each string company has their own way of going about making them.

5. bolt on means the neck is literally bolted to the body, this is the most common and cheapest way to have a guitar put together. also allows for easy neck swaps. neck thru means the neck is one solid piece of wood, running from the headstock all the way to the back of the body. this means the body is two seperate pieces then. think of the body as "wings" on the neck.

6. the nut is the place on the headstock, right before the first fret, where the stings sit in. the denser the nut material, the more energy transfer, the more sustain. you dont want a plastic nut.

7. actually, epiphone was started before gibson, but now that is basically what has happened. epiphone is licensed to produce gibson models at a lesser price, of course with lesser materials and workmanship. dont get me wrong though, you can get some ballin' epi's

8. like i said before, bone is a dense material, and that would beat the hell out of having a plastic nut

9. hardware would be knobs, switches, could include electronics

10. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strings_%28music%29

11. when has EQ NOT meant equalizer?


Pretty much covers it. However, you do not get 0.45 strings. My G string is now half an inch wide. You mean 0.045.
Warwick freak of the Bass Militia. PM Nutter_101 to join

Quote by elliott FTW
Damn you and Warwickyness

Quote by ScottB
Quote by CLIFF_BURTON
gm jack knows everything
+1
#7
Quote by FrankieHCO
EDIT: What does it mean to be GASing for something? maybe to be working towards getting it?


GAS = Gear Acquisition Syndrome
Last edited by BassicDragon33 at Dec 10, 2009,
#8
Quote by The^Unforgiven
Hardware also includes the tuners and other stuff, for instance, with floating tremolos, the springs, even though I haven't heard of a bass having one... is the bridge also considered hardware?


What are tremelos?
Quote by COBHC1
I lol'd

First lol row
Quote by bloodtrocuted93
They will be twin boys named God and Satan and I will make them fight each other.

http://www.virtual-bubblewrap.com/index.shtml
Quote by sg255
If I cross the street to get away from them, then it's a latino.
#9
Quote by gm jack
Pretty much covers it. However, you do not get 0.45 strings. My G string is now half an inch wide. You mean 0.045.


I was confused when I read that one. I figured a decimal was in the wrong place.
Quote by COBHC1
I lol'd

First lol row
Quote by bloodtrocuted93
They will be twin boys named God and Satan and I will make them fight each other.

http://www.virtual-bubblewrap.com/index.shtml
Quote by sg255
If I cross the street to get away from them, then it's a latino.
#10
Quote by htsktim91989
1. binding is a (usually) plastic aesthetic that goes around the body/headstock/neck on the very edge, or corner of the guitar.

2. inlay is a decoration between the frets, most commonly a dot or diamond.

3. the numbers you see are the string gauges, from low to high. so the high string would be .45 of an inch, the lowest string would be .105 of an inch. you can change this depending on your preference of string and how you set up the guitar.

4. strings again are your personal preference. you wont hear a sound difference unless you have well trained ears, but each string company has their own way of going about making them.

5. bolt on means the neck is literally bolted to the body, this is the most common and cheapest way to have a guitar put together. also allows for easy neck swaps. neck thru means the neck is one solid piece of wood, running from the headstock all the way to the back of the body. this means the body is two seperate pieces then. think of the body as "wings" on the neck.

6. the nut is the place on the headstock, right before the first fret, where the stings sit in. the denser the nut material, the more energy transfer, the more sustain. you dont want a plastic nut.

7. actually, epiphone was started before gibson, but now that is basically what has happened. epiphone is licensed to produce gibson models at a lesser price, of course with lesser materials and workmanship. dont get me wrong though, you can get some ballin' epi's

8. like i said before, bone is a dense material, and that would beat the hell out of having a plastic nut

9. hardware would be knobs, switches, could include electronics

10. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strings_%28music%29

11. when has EQ NOT meant equalizer?


Thank you. Great job answering my questions man.
Quote by COBHC1
I lol'd

First lol row
Quote by bloodtrocuted93
They will be twin boys named God and Satan and I will make them fight each other.

http://www.virtual-bubblewrap.com/index.shtml
Quote by sg255
If I cross the street to get away from them, then it's a latino.
#11
Quote by FrankieHCO
What are tremelos?
You ever see a guitar that has a rail-like system with a bar around the bridge? That's a tremolo. Basically you can just dump (or raise) the bar to make some awesome noises. Very metal.

Also it helps with other things, most tremolos will keep tune very well.
#12
Quote by BassicDragon33
GAS = Gear Acquisition Syndrome



Then I'm soooo friggin GASing for a Ibanez SR5005e
Quote by COBHC1
I lol'd

First lol row
Quote by bloodtrocuted93
They will be twin boys named God and Satan and I will make them fight each other.

http://www.virtual-bubblewrap.com/index.shtml
Quote by sg255
If I cross the street to get away from them, then it's a latino.
#13
Quote by Steve08
You ever see a guitar that has a rail-like system with a bar around the bridge? That's a tremolo. Basically you can just dump (or raise) the bar to make some awesome noises. Very metal.

Also it helps with other things, most tremolos will keep tune very well.


That sounds a lot like a whammy bar to me
Quote by COBHC1
I lol'd

First lol row
Quote by bloodtrocuted93
They will be twin boys named God and Satan and I will make them fight each other.

http://www.virtual-bubblewrap.com/index.shtml
Quote by sg255
If I cross the street to get away from them, then it's a latino.
#14
Same thing. The technical name is tremolo.
I have:
Acoustic B200H+B115 cab, Schecter Stiletto Custom 4, Rondo Fretless, Boss EQ-7.

Some men just want to watch the world burn. And they work at Behringer.
#15
Quote by samskii
Same thing. The technical name is tremolo.


Nah, tremolo is incorrect. Tremolo is rapid volume increase and decrease. Whammy is pitch shifting.
Warwick freak of the Bass Militia. PM Nutter_101 to join

Quote by elliott FTW
Damn you and Warwickyness

Quote by ScottB
Quote by CLIFF_BURTON
gm jack knows everything
+1
#16
Quote by gm jack
Nah, tremolo is incorrect. Tremolo is rapid volume increase and decrease. Whammy is pitch shifting.


So if they're two different things, are there ways of having both?
Quote by COBHC1
I lol'd

First lol row
Quote by bloodtrocuted93
They will be twin boys named God and Satan and I will make them fight each other.

http://www.virtual-bubblewrap.com/index.shtml
Quote by sg255
If I cross the street to get away from them, then it's a latino.
#17
Leo Fender didn't know the difference, it all spawned from him naming the equipment wrongly.
Everyone still knows it as a tremolo bridge.


My trem bridge, thought I may as well show off.
(That IS a killbutton ladies and gents.)


Ways of having both would be using the volume knob as well as having a trem.
Or an expression pedal.
#18
Quote by FrankieHCO
So if they're two different things, are there ways of having both?


They are the same thing, but a tremolo arm is an incorrect name for it.
Warwick freak of the Bass Militia. PM Nutter_101 to join

Quote by elliott FTW
Damn you and Warwickyness

Quote by ScottB
Quote by CLIFF_BURTON
gm jack knows everything
+1
#19
Compressors technically aren't tone changers, they 'compress' the attack and give you more of a block sound rather than a triangle or trapezoid. If they change the tone, then I don't know. I've only been told the theory, I've never actually played around with one. If you look at the instructional video on youtube for the Marcus Miller Preamp, he explains this concept, as well as a few others.
#20
You're both not really correct.
People need to start knowing what they are talking about before posting advice to others, because it doesn't help anyone.

A compressor evens out the sound levels basically.
If you have some really soft notes and some really loud, it will average the volume, to avoid spikes. Some compressors do make it louder though, and they also improve sustain alot.