#1
I have two 8ohm cabinets daisy chained together. What speaker output can I plug this into? One of my amps has two 8ohm and one 16ohm and the other has an 4, 8, and 16ohm outputs. I think it is 4ohm. Can I plug a lesser ohm into a higher ohm output without hurting the amp. Amps Egnater Rebel 20, Blackstar HT-5
#2
you want the total ohms of your cabs to be of equal value...or higher value than the ohms of your head.

i.e. 8ohm head running a 16ohm cab is generally OK, an 8ohm head running a 4ohm cab is not.
Last edited by eyebanez333 at Dec 10, 2009,
#3
wouldn't daisy chaining imply 'series' under normal conditions though? 8 + 8 = 16?

My question is why do you have 2 amp heads running into a pair of cabs that are daisy chained? Why wouldn't you just have one amp head per cab?
#4
Quote by 311ZOSOVHJH
wouldn't daisy chaining imply 'series' under normal conditions though? 8 + 8 = 16?

My question is why do you have 2 amp heads running into a pair of cabs that are daisy chained? Why wouldn't you just have one amp head per cab?


yep if its in series that would be right. i was thinking about them being in parallel. the only time i daisy chain cabinets is on my bass rig and they go in parallel.
Last edited by eyebanez333 at Dec 10, 2009,
#5
I thought the wiring within the cabs doesn't matter, just the overall ohms of each? As for daisy chaining being parallel or series, I'm not sure... But I'm interested.
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#6
Quote by tubetime86
I thought the wiring within the cabs doesn't matter, just the overall ohms of each? As for daisy chaining being parallel or series, I'm not sure... But I'm interested.


I've been doing some looking around on the web to find a definite answer and most threads end up with the same stalemate...nobody knows

EDIT: this is from Aguilar's website regarding cabs wired in parallel:
The output jacks of Aguilar amplifiers are in parallel, so when you plug in two cabinets you are putting them in parallel. If you "daisy-chain" the cabinets this will also put them in parallel. The combined load of two cabinets in parallel goes like this:

Two 8 ohm cabinets combine to make 4 ohms

Two 4 ohm cabinets combine to make 2 ohms

I still think it comes down to how the cab is wired. Two 8ohm, series cabs daisy chained adds resistance so the total load is 16ohm...while two 8ohm parallel cabs daisy chained drops resistance...making the total load 4ohms.
Last edited by eyebanez333 at Dec 10, 2009,
#7
Quote by eyebanez333
I've been doing some looking around on the web to find a definite answer and most threads end up with the same stalemate...nobody knows

Well if you were to draw up a schematic, you'd think that 2 cabs in parallel, daisy chained together would just be one big parallel circuit... But I've heard that is not the case. I am no good beyond the textbook definitions of the two terms so I have to rely on other people's opinion on these issues.

I'd love to get Rutch, Alxxxx, Fly135 or one of those guys in here to help clear this up.
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Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#8
tube, as far as I know we are not talking about the wiring INSIDE each cab. Just cab to cab.

To me, daisy chaining means 'series' but I could be wrong. Where parallel would come in play would be if your amp supports parallel speaker outs and you run 2 cabs in stereo for example. Same thing with one stereo cab, where you have 2 sets of speakers each handling one side of the stereo feeds.

Because I'm confused with the OP, I can't take this any further.


Edit: ****, now I'm confused.
Last edited by 311ZOSOVHJH at Dec 10, 2009,
#9
They're parallel, so daisy-chaining would bring you 4 ohms total.

For a series circuit, the wires have to go between speakers, not jacks, so to speak.

I suppose a cab could be wired to be daisied to give a series impedance, but that would render it useless on it's own without a switch, I imagine.

Interesting stuff, never thought about series wiring across two cabs...

But if you think about it, for series wiring to work, it has to pass through each speaker individually before "returning" on the negative side, so tracing the circuit path would send us into the 1st cab, out to the 2nd cab, then straight back to the amp, like so:
(forgive the crude mspaintery!)


I'm not saying it can't be done, just that I've never run into it, and I imagine that is because parallel daisy chaining is not only simpler, but more intuitive.
#11
Although, now that I think about it, I'm sure it can be done, it's just probably not common, particularly outside of large, long-string PA applications.

I KNOW I've seen PA speakers with either a switch for series/parallel operation, or seperate parallel or series jacks.

If you look at the speaker on the left in the above "drawing", you can see that if the right jack (or extension jack) were a switching type, it could close upon removal of the daisy chain cord, allowing normal single cab series function.
#12
Here is what Lopo cab co. the place were I bought the cabinets said.

When you daisy chain cabs, you are splitting the total load in half. Since they are both 8 ohms, you will run at an 8 ohm load, half of 16. Let me know if you need anything else.

I don't know if this is right but I guess they should know what they are doing. Everybody seems to be all over the board with this.

This is how it is wired in the cab with two jacks- The speaker is plugged into one jack and wires from that same jack conect to the jack next to it. this is the jack I run to the other cabinet. Both have 8ohm speakers in it. Is that series or parallel?
Last edited by Rockbly at Dec 11, 2009,
#13
Quote by 311ZOSOVHJH

My question is why do you have 2 amp heads running into a pair of cabs that are daisy chained? Why wouldn't you just have one amp head per cab?


It sounds better with two speakers. I just a/b/y them so I can switch the heads between the cabinets.
#14
Here is what Avatar Cab Co said-

HI...when you have two 8 ohm speakers wired up in a 212 mono cab, it can only be one of two ways....either series which makes it 16 ohm or parallel which makes it 4 ohm...two 8 ohm cannot be 8 ohm...so "When you daisy chain cabs, you are splitting the total load in half. Since they are both 8 ohms, you will run at an 8 ohm load, half of 16.

That is two cab companies telling me the same thing so 8ohm jack it is. Hope nothing blows up. Thanks for all the responses!
#15
Quote by Rockbly
When you daisy chain cabs, you are splitting the total load in half. Since they are both 8 ohms, you will run at an 8 ohm load, half of 16.


Nope.

Maybe the boys at Avatar are having an off day?

Two 8 ohm cabs in parallel will give a total load of 4 ohms, NOT 8.
Two 8 ohm cabs in series will give a total load of 16 ohms, NOT 8.

There's no possible way two 8 ohm cabs can be connected to give a total load of 8 ohms, just can't do it.

Perhaps they, or I, are not clear on the numbers here?

I am assuming (2) 8 ohm cabs, loaded with (2) 16 ohm speakers each, internally wired parallel.
#16
Get an ohmmeter and daisychain your cabs together, read from one end to the other and then you will have your impedance!
problem solved
#17
Quote by Rutch
Nope.

Maybe the boys at Avatar are having an off day?

Two 8 ohm cabs in parallel will give a total load of 4 ohms, NOT 8.
Two 8 ohm cabs in series will give a total load of 16 ohms, NOT 8.

There's no possible way two 8 ohm cabs can be connected to give a total load of 8 ohms, just can't do it.

Perhaps they, or I, are not clear on the numbers here?

I am assuming (2) 8 ohm cabs, loaded with (2) 16 ohm speakers each, internally wired parallel.


These are two individual cabinets with one 12inch 8ohm speaker in each. Both companies said that wiring in series and parallel is only done when there is more than one speaker in a cabinet and the wiring is done in that cabinet. I emailed each company Lopo and Avatar twice to make sure I was explaining this correctly and they gave me same answer every time. I think I'm going to go wtih them on this because, well they are a cabinet making company and they wired the speakers in the cabs I have and put The jacks on the back.
#18
Quote by Rockbly
These are two individual cabinets with one 12inch 8ohm speaker in each.


I stand corrected, from your posts I thought we were dealing with two 2x12's sorry!

Two single 8 ohm cabs daisy chained in parallel with give 4 ohms total impedance.
Chain them, then plug into the 4 ohm tap of your amp.

---------------------------------------------

OR: (this is what I would do, )

Plug one 8 ohm cab into the 8 ohm tap on one amp...

THEN:
Plug the other 8 ohm cab into the 8 ohm tap on the OTHER amp...

THEN:
Get a splitter and run your guitar signal into both amps, tweak to taste, and bask in the sonic bliss of two amps running stereo. One crunchy one clean, or one icepicky one muddy, etc...
#19
Avatar says:
"When you daisy chain cabs, you are splitting the total load in half. Since they are both 8 ohms, you will run at an 8 ohm load, half of 16.
#20
^I'm actually with Rutch on this one. No offense to Avatar as I have one of their cabs and they are a great group of guys and all but they have given me information before that was not correct...just sayin.

2 - 8 ohm cabs run in parallel if 4.
2 - 8 ohm cabs run in series is 16.

I double check with Avatar again, maybe they were thinking 2 speakers in one cab like was.

Also, I agree with Rutch that using an ABY box up front is a better idea.

I also like the suggestion of using a multimeter to double check. Great tool for guitarists.