#1
[totally different from other topic]

Mp3 is in my profile and everything is explained in it.
#2
Well, it is clearly falsetto. The second one was just more of an exaggerated, weaker falsetto. Even the G you sang in there was falsetto. Even the middle C had a very falsetto - or at least very thin, throaty - kind of sound to it.

Despite your self-assessment, you are clearly not a tenor, based on that recorded demonstration.

Compare yours to some of these:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BZMQKVH0BtA

Even some of them are not very well produced. The first one nails it, though. Sounds like Pavarotti to me.

Alternately, the chorus of Run to the Hills goes up to the tenor C, though Dickenson hits the D just above it just for a smidge. Those are full-voice tenor Cs. Yours sound nothing like that. Theirs have a very robust quality that can only be achieved by singing in full voice. Falsetto lacks that depth, resonance, and power.


A baritone would be able to sing that G in full voice. You might get there, but you're not there yet. You don't sound like a bass either.

You really need to start producing your tone properly - or at least with some conviction - before anyone can accurately assess where you're at.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#5
Yeah, that was definitely falsetto. The second C used the same mechanism, and had the same tonal quality, I'm just guessing you may have deliberately weakened it a little to make a distinction between the two notes. There was a point when you began singing high notes where your voice broke a little. That's when you started using falsetto.

If you start singing the lowest note you are able to at full volume, and gradually raise in pitch until your highest, I would wager that there will be a definitive point where your voice will either crack because you're pulling chest voice, flip into falsetto, or you'll get quiet to make it over the passaggio (that flipping point.) If you want a connected voice from your lowest note to your highest, while retaining power, you'll need to be able to sing in a place that will allow you to get over this point with minimal change in tonal quality occurring. If you're especially in tune with how your vocal mechanism works, you should be able to find a wealth of information online that will allow you to teach yourself how to do this. It does take a considerable amount of practice though, so don't be discouraged if you can't do this right away.
Last edited by Chaingarden at Dec 12, 2009,
#6
Chain and axmanchris I can't thank you guys enough. I've been singing in my falsetto voice for a long time, to the point where its normally how I sing. Today I was singing Kryptonite and just had a moment of realization when everything felt right. Throat open, palate raise, and I actually felt the rush of air aimed outward, not inward. The best part was, as long as I've been singing, I have been improving, but once I finally got this...I actually sounded good. Even to myself. I've never had that. I even have a bit of grit to my full voice which I absolutely love. Based on this, I found my top range is about F or F# over middle C, and to hit these, I have to increase in volume way loud, but I can hit them. Thank you guys so much.
#7
Quote by Mekchrious
Chain and axmanchris I can't thank you guys enough. I've been singing in my falsetto voice for a long time, to the point where its normally how I sing. Today I was singing Kryptonite and just had a moment of realization when everything felt right. Throat open, palate raise, and I actually felt the rush of air aimed outward, not inward. The best part was, as long as I've been singing, I have been improving, but once I finally got this...I actually sounded good. Even to myself. I've never had that. I even have a bit of grit to my full voice which I absolutely love. Based on this, I found my top range is about F or F# over middle C, and to hit these, I have to increase in volume way loud, but I can hit them. Thank you guys so much.


No problem. It feels nice to belt it for the first time, I know. Be careful though, as you get higher, don't get too much into the habit of pushing your voice. You'll want to learn how to mix with your head voice (some people call this falsetto, though it is a different mechanism.) Ideally, you should never feel like you're reaching for a note, unless it's a G5 or something.
#8
That's another great part tho my old singing always made my voice a little sore but I can belt an F# which is the top or close to the top and my voice feels great before and after.
#9
That's all good news. It sounds like you're probably a baritone then. That's fine. 80% of us are. You don't need to be a tenor to be a great singer.

The other good news is, having experienced that sensation, you know both what it feels like and how you achieved it. You'll be able to re-create that sensation and that sound much more easily and much more consistently from now on.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.