#1
Who really wants to take "being in a band" seriously?

This is not a sarcastic question. I really wanna know, why aren't people as dedicated as they were say, back in the 60s. Why don't people have that drive to be succesful in a band?

Please no smart-ass remarks. Just trying to ask a question here.
#2
I just think that the music industry has changed so much during the decades, that it's damn hard to make it these days, when anyone can make near professional quality recordings on their pc's with small money... the competition's just become so much tougher. Not saying it wasn't tough in the old days, but it's tougher now, and everybody knows it.
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#3
Quote by GivingUp
Who really wants to take "being in a band" seriously?

This is not a sarcastic question. I really wanna know, why aren't people as dedicated as they were say, back in the 60s. Why don't people have that drive to be succesful in a band?

Please no smart-ass remarks. Just trying to ask a question here.

I don't think that's true. The only reason you think that is because you see a bunch of bands goofing off now, and you think "Oh man, everybody is clowning around! I can't think of ONE band who jerked off like that from the 60's". But there were a lot of wackoffs in the 60's, it's just that nobody remembers them now cuz they didn't go anywhere, just like people won't remember the non-dedicated bands of today.
Quote by AA00P
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#4
I do.. I mean, my group was signed.. and people are investing money in my group... so yeah. I HAVE to take it seriously.
#5
Quote by GivingUp
Who really wants to take "being in a band" seriously?


depends on your goals, and I will make smartass comments where I damn well please.
#6
Quote by GivingUp
Who really wants to take "being in a band" seriously?

This is not a sarcastic question. I really wanna know, why aren't people as dedicated as they were say, back in the 60s. Why don't people have that drive to be succesful in a band?

Please no smart-ass remarks. Just trying to ask a question here.


You are generalising. Where is your evidence? I mean, there are hundreds, if not thousands of bands\groups out there 'taking it seriously'. New music is released all the time, maybe I'm making a massive assumption, but surely those artists are 'taking it seriously'.

So post your evidence.
#7
Because instruments/tuition are much cheaper and much easier to find now than in the 60s, it's much easier (and cheaper) to take up Music as a hobby than as a full time serious commitment. Still though, there are absolute craploads of people who are absolutely serious about music. Look around, you don't even have to go past this website.
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#8
I don't feel like I have to provide "evidence". Get real. We know that it's just that it's the truth that bands/ musicians don't really value being in a band and struggling to get your music heard.

I mean like missing practice, not cooperating, just general stuff like that. I don't think people really feel like they should be dedicated to it. Some people will say that they're passionate about playing music, yet they will say that "Oh, it's not gauranteed that I'll get signed, on the radio, etc etc, SO I'm just gonna dedicate 90% of my time to college and 10% of my time to the band."

Obviously, people don't say that word for word, but what I'm saying is that it seemed like guys/girls had more passion for music in lets say, the 60s when they had to WORK to get their band heard.

IN GENERAL, people just aren't really passionate about getting their music heard.
#9
Quote by GivingUp
I don't feel like I have to provide "evidence". Get real. We know that it's just that it's the truth that bands/ musicians don't really value being in a band and struggling to get your music heard.

I mean like missing practice, not cooperating, just general stuff like that. I don't think people really feel like they should be dedicated to it. Some people will say that they're passionate about playing music, yet they will say that "Oh, it's not gauranteed that I'll get signed, on the radio, etc etc, SO I'm just gonna dedicate 90% of my time to college and 10% of my time to the band."

Obviously, people don't say that word for word, but what I'm saying is that it seemed like guys/girls had more passion for music in lets say, the 60s when they had to WORK to get their band heard.

IN GENERAL, people just aren't really passionate about getting their music heard.

Were you alive in the 60's? You really wouldn't know unless you were there. There have ALWAYS been TONS of non-dedicated musicians. People have always had defeatist attitudes about it. There is no ground to say that there isn't the same passion for music like there used to be. It's just that because you actually live in this day and age you are subjected to some of this generation's negativity. That doesn't mean that it never existed in the 60's. It was probably just as abundant in the 60's. It's just not relevant to music now. And all the current non-dedicated musicians will be non-relevant in the future.
Quote by AA00P
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#10
Quote by GivingUp
I don't feel like I have to provide "evidence". Get real. We know that it's just that it's the truth that bands/ musicians don't really value being in a band and struggling to get your music heard.

I mean like missing practice, not cooperating, just general stuff like that. I don't think people really feel like they should be dedicated to it. Some people will say that they're passionate about playing music, yet they will say that "Oh, it's not gauranteed that I'll get signed, on the radio, etc etc, SO I'm just gonna dedicate 90% of my time to college and 10% of my time to the band."

Obviously, people don't say that word for word, but what I'm saying is that it seemed like guys/girls had more passion for music in lets say, the 60s when they had to WORK to get their band heard.

IN GENERAL, people just aren't really passionate about getting their music heard.



If you can provide one piece of objective, empirical proof to back this up, I will take this statement seriously. I honestly have no idea what point it is that you're trying to make.
If you're saying musicians aren't as serious as in the 1960s, then I'd suggest you find new musicians to play with.
#11
Quote by GivingUp
I don't feel like I have to provide "evidence". Get real. We know that it's just that it's the truth that bands/ musicians don't really value being in a band and struggling to get your music heard.

I mean like missing practice, not cooperating, just general stuff like that. I don't think people really feel like they should be dedicated to it. Some people will say that they're passionate about playing music, yet they will say that "Oh, it's not gauranteed that I'll get signed, on the radio, etc etc, SO I'm just gonna dedicate 90% of my time to college and 10% of my time to the band."

Obviously, people don't say that word for word, but what I'm saying is that it seemed like guys/girls had more passion for music in lets say, the 60s when they had to WORK to get their band heard.

IN GENERAL, people just aren't really passionate about getting their music heard.


Get the **** out man. How the hell would you know what the 60's were like anyways. I bet people back then were the same now. But don't say that no one works to get their stuff heard. I spend 12 hours a day working on my own goddamn music. All of my mates have ****ing jobs as well, but it only took 3 months until we got signed. If you don't call that dedication, then you deserve to be punched in the face. Idc what you or anyone else says, but there are people out there that work pretty ****in hard.
Last edited by pepsi1187 at Dec 11, 2009,
#12
Quote by GivingUp
I don't feel like I have to provide "evidence". Get real. We know that it's just that it's the truth that bands/ musicians don't really value being in a band and struggling to get your music heard.

I mean like missing practice, not cooperating, just general stuff like that. I don't think people really feel like they should be dedicated to it. Some people will say that they're passionate about playing music, yet they will say that "Oh, it's not gauranteed that I'll get signed, on the radio, etc etc, SO I'm just gonna dedicate 90% of my time to college and 10% of my time to the band."

Obviously, people don't say that word for word, but what I'm saying is that it seemed like guys/girls had more passion for music in lets say, the 60s when they had to WORK to get their band heard.

IN GENERAL, people just aren't really passionate about getting their music heard.


No, you should 'Get Real', even saying IN GENERAL, doesn't mean you have any solid proof that the majority of musicians out there don't value being in a band. And stating your opinons as facts doesn't bring any weight to your poorly supported arguement.
#13
Quote by GivingUp
I don't feel like I have to provide "evidence". Get real. We know that it's just that it's the truth that bands/ musicians don't really value being in a band and struggling to get your music heard.
We know that? Really? You've just made a blanket statement to cover all. I seriously doubt anyone who tries to generalize without evidence to back it up.

Hypothetically: if this were true as a generalization now, how does this compare with the situation in the '60s? Were you there? Do you have any sort of evidence to indicate what the general attitude was then? No?

Quote by GivingUp
I mean like missing practice, not cooperating, just general stuff like that. I don't think people really feel like they should be dedicated to it. Some people will say that they're passionate about playing music, yet they will say that "Oh, it's not gauranteed that I'll get signed, on the radio, etc etc, SO I'm just gonna dedicate 90% of my time to college and 10% of my time to the band."
I really doubt all bands in the '60s were trying to "get signed". Most likely, it was the common expectation that they'd play local gigs and make a little money and have some fun. Sure, some of them had high aspirations. But my guess would be not so many of them did.

Quote by GivingUp
Obviously, people don't say that word for word, but what I'm saying is that it seemed like guys/girls had more passion for music in lets say, the 60s when they had to WORK to get their band heard.
Wait ... WHAT???

In the '60s it took MORE work, for a band to "get heard"? I really doubt this. The price of decent instruments (adjusted for inflation) was a hell of a lot higher in the '60s. Availability of instruments and total number of musicians was low. Mainstream music in the '60s was less complex. It stands to reason, it would be much easier for a band in the '60s to get heard. There were far fewer of them to start with.

Quote by GivingUp
IN GENERAL, people just aren't really passionate about getting their music heard.
I disagree. I believe there has always been a range of "passion" within the world of musicians.

Today, there are a hell of a lot more "posers" who can afford instruments but make little effort to play them. Today there are a hell of a lot more musicians who make a half-effort at playing music, but do reasonably well. Today there are a hell of a lot more SERIOUS musicians than there were in the '60s.

Bottom line:
Today there are a hell of a lot more people playing music at all levels, than there was in the '60s.

One thing that is different today, is the number of diversions. People have more disposable income and can afford numerous "hobbies". Also, the great time-sinks of today: watching high quality movies at home, a million television channels, and the internet, didn't exist in the '60s. So if someone had made the investment in musical equipment, they didn't have so many other things available for them to do.

But that only explains the higher percentage of posers. There are still tons more serious musicians today than in the '60s. If you can't find serious musicians, the fault lies with you.
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#14
Quote by GivingUp
I don't feel like I have to provide "evidence". Get real. We know that it's just that it's the truth...IN GENERAL...


"Officer, GivingUp is a ruthless, vicious child molester - lock him up for the rest of his life, have twelve perverts stomp his ass in the shower every day! What? I don't feel like I have to provide 'evidence' - we know that it's just the truth! IN GENERAL, he justs goes around molesting children!"

I'd go on, but I have to get off the net now and go shoot some fish I have in a barrel out back.
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#15
Quote by Damascus
"Officer, GivingUp is a ruthless, vicious child molester - lock him up for the rest of his life, have twelve perverts stomp his ass in the shower every day! What? I don't feel like I have to provide 'evidence' - we know that it's just the truth! IN GENERAL, he justs goes around molesting children!"

I'd go on, but I have to get off the net now and go shoot some fish I have in a barrel out back.


Eloquent
#16
.... how can you make that judgement if you weren't born in the 60's?
Quote by the_white_bunny
your just a simpleton that cant understand strategy apparently.

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#17
Quote by isabiggles
.... how can you make that judgement if you weren't born in the 60's?

I was born in 1959. Do I get a vote?

Just from what i've seen, it really isn't all that different. The industry has changed in significant ways, but many people don't realize how much work you have to do, to be really good at anything. Great musicians make it look easy. When people find that out, they give up, dabble at it(me), or become a poser.

If you really want to do this stuff well, it really does take a great deal of work, even for people who have natural abilities. You may have perfect pitch or the ability to sing 5 octaves, but you have to figure out what to do with that talent, and develop it.

Edit: Plus, there are many more people out there. I haven't checked my numbers, but I think the population of the U.S. alone has increased by about 100 million(+/-), since the sixties. In this country, even if you are a one in a million, there are 100 more people just as talented as you. Not empirical data, but something to consider.
Last edited by chokmool at Dec 11, 2009,
#18
No, not if you're seven years old during the 60's
Quote by the_white_bunny
your just a simpleton that cant understand strategy apparently.

Quote by the_white_bunny
all hail king of the penis sucking(i said balls. you said dick for some reason?) Isabiggles
#19
Quote by isabiggles
No, not if you're seven years old during the 60's

Dude, I was 7 in 1967. I was listening to Hendrix while he was still alive, because I liked his songs.

It wasn't when I "came of age", but I was fairly advanced for a kid. I was only three, but I still remember when JFK got assassinated, and how weird everyone was acting. I am a teen of the seventies, but I am in some ways very linked to the sixties. I should at least get a percentage of a vote.
#20
A degree of seriousness is required in any band to progress. If you don't take anything seriously, fundamental elements like learning songs or having productive practice sessions would not exist.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#21
Those that are dedicated are still there, there's just more people that aren't. I blame the internet and MTV. Music is no longer about the music, it's so that you can wear tight pants, pick up chicks, and say "Ooo look at me I'm in a band, I'm cooler than you."
#22
OP, are you suggesting it's not difficult to get heard today?

granted, it's not impossible, and on some levels it's very attainable, but there is certainly a lot of work involved. even if you want to play at a hole in the wall joint out i the boonies, you still need to be listenable.

people who say "ya know what, it's just not worth it... I could be concentraiting on school/work" are right to do so. That's where they're more likely to find success, and for them music is what it is to many... a hobby.
#23
Quote by GivingUp
I don't feel like I have to provide "evidence". Get real. We know that it's just that it's the truth that bands/ musicians don't really value being in a band and struggling to get your music heard.

I mean like missing practice, not cooperating, just general stuff like that. I don't think people really feel like they should be dedicated to it. Some people will say that they're passionate about playing music, yet they will say that "Oh, it's not gauranteed that I'll get signed, on the radio, etc etc, SO I'm just gonna dedicate 90% of my time to college and 10% of my time to the band."

Obviously, people don't say that word for word, but what I'm saying is that it seemed like guys/girls had more passion for music in lets say, the 60s when they had to WORK to get their band heard.

IN GENERAL, people just aren't really passionate about getting their music heard.


This really sounds like it's based solely on your own experience. How would you know if other bands are "missing practice" or "not cooperating"?

I would argue that today it is much harder to be a HUGE mainstream success (like U2, Coldplay, etc), but easier to achieve middling success, 'cause it's much easier to get your music out there, and there are so many niche markets and sub-genres that didn't exist in the 60's. That doesn't mean you don't have to work at it though, nor does it mean that people don't work at it. In fact, that is precisely why a lot of people dedicate 90% of time to college and 10% to their band. Because even now there's still no guarantee you can make a living off of being in a band, even if you do really work at it. So some people decide to keep it as just a hobby so they can actually, y'know, eat and stuff.