#1
It gets kind of frustrating, so my question is how do most of you compensate for wrong tabs. I know the obvious answer is to just figure it out by listening which is what I have been doing but is there any theory that may be helpful as well?
#3
Guitar pro software, power tab software and sibelius. GP and powertab have MANY online tabs that you can hear for yourself and its great for practicing timing (most underrated aspect of music as far as guitarists go) as you can change the tempo.
#5
Music theory helps because it helps you understand music - start by learning the notes on the fretboard then learn about intervals and the major scale, that will give you the building blocks for the majority of western music and allow you to learn the ins and outs of how why things work together. If you understand music better then you'll find it easier to see structure in the things you learn, otherwise it can just seem kind of random.

Watching these should help a lot too.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PnbOWi6f_IM
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#6
never follow tabs note for note, especially for timing and rhythm patterns and whatnot - use it as a loose guide for establishing a key. if it doesn't sound completely right to you, play around and find the correct note.

if you keep this up you'll train your ear and begin to work out licks and riffs for yourself, which is very satisfying.
#7
I don't even bother to look for tabs because I listen to too many obscure bands and there probably wouldn't be tabs anyway lol

the more you work out songs by ear, the easier/quicker it gets.. soon you won't even need tabs unless you're being lazy
#8
When I first started playing the guitar, I was absolutely set on learning songs perfectly, note for note. These days, however, I find it much more useful to just figure out the basic chords and learn the main riffs. If it's a song I have a large incentive to learn properly (e.g., if it's for a stage show), I'll do it properly and close to accurately, but if it's just for fun and broader musical knowledge, there's not such a great benefit in learning everything.

You'll soon realize that the marginal benefit of practising a song until you can replicate it perfectly hardly ever matches the marginal cost of the time and effort spent. When you improve, you can improvise over songs yourself, but it's a good idea to learn things as accurately as possible when you're just starting out.
#9
Eh, I'm not that new really, I've been playing like a year. I just started learning theory and I'm just tired of playing songs that don't sound quite right hear and there.
Last edited by shoottheofficer at Dec 11, 2009,
#10
Quote by zephyrclaw
When I first started playing the guitar, I was absolutely set on learning songs perfectly, note for note. These days, however, I find it much more useful to just figure out the basic chords and learn the main riffs. If it's a song I have a large incentive to learn properly (e.g., if it's for a stage show), I'll do it properly and close to accurately, but if it's just for fun and broader musical knowledge, there's not such a great benefit in learning everything.

You'll soon realize that the marginal benefit of practising a song until you can replicate it perfectly hardly ever matches the marginal cost of the time and effort spent. When you improve, you can improvise over songs yourself, but it's a good idea to learn things as accurately as possible when you're just starting out.


My philosophy for learning songs is evolving the same way as yours. I guess it's a personal decision guitarists have to make, whether to learn whole songs note for note or not. In the beginning I wanted to learn every song note for note, and I do see the value in doing so, but as you say, you have to do a cost/benefit analysis of continuing to plod away on certain parts of songs. At this point I only try to learn the parts of songs and solos that really inspire me. Even my favorite guitar players have moments in some solos that seem like they are just hitting random notes, where it's not a lick I would ever want to duplicate. So now I just focus on analyzing and playing things that are interesting to me. Of course, I'm just a "home musician." I'm not in a band and likely never will be. I just play for fun. If I was playing songs live I might be more inclined to learn them note for note.
#11
Quote by jsepguitar
My philosophy for learning songs is evolving the same way as yours. I guess it's a personal decision guitarists have to make, whether to learn whole songs note for note or not. In the beginning I wanted to learn every song note for note, and I do see the value in doing so, but as you say, you have to do a cost/benefit analysis of continuing to plod away on certain parts of songs. At this point I only try to learn the parts of songs and solos that really inspire me. Even my favorite guitar players have moments in some solos that seem like they are just hitting random notes, where it's not a lick I would ever want to duplicate. So now I just focus on analyzing and playing things that are interesting to me. Of course, I'm just a "home musician." I'm not in a band and likely never will be. I just play for fun. If I was playing songs live I might be more inclined to learn them note for note.


Same here. Once I get the gist of what the song is about and how it is done, I am OK with "close enough" or, even better, putting my own stamp on it. How many versions of "You Shook Me Babe" have you heard (Led Zeppelin, Beck/Stewart, Willie Dixon, etc.)? Or "Stormy Monday"? Each performer does their own interpretation of it.
#12
It's definately not a starting out thing, as I've been going at it almost 18 years, but I like to try to learn songs as close to the original as I can get them.
The way I see it is, that there is usually a decent sized chunk of a song that I can get after a reasonable amount of work. That's the part where my skills and the guitarist in the song's overlap, and where our tendencies and styles are more similar. Then there is the other part that does not come easily at all. That's the part where you see the gap between how solid his skills are and mine. Or that stylistically it's just different from what I'm used to playing.
I've found that if I buckle down and learn that second chunk, that's when I notice an improvement in my playing. My technique improves, and I add of all his devices to my improvising bag.
The only thing to watch out for is the law of diminishing returns. I've gotten downright obsessive at times about being able to nail stuff, and spent months to a year plus working on it (not exclusively though). That's been a journey - having to really dig deep to analyze where the issues are, and I've grown from it, but at the same time a bit more balance and variety would be good.
#13
Haha thats exactly the problem I listen to allot of obscure bands and there's like maby one or two versions of each song tabbed out usually. But thanks allot you guys really put things into perspective for me.
#14
There are SOME accurate tabs out there. I usually just look at the first few notes/chords in the tab and pretty much figure it out from there.

Also, I suggest starting to stay away from tabs and figure songs out yourself. It's SOOOO good for training your ear when you're not mindlessly following numbers on a screen but rather figuring songs out and applying the theory you know, and somewhat learning new 'theory' just by seeing how it's used in songs
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#15
The accurate tabs are for very well known songs.. If you want tabs for less well known songs or (technically) difficult or very long songs, I suggest you get yourself a copy of Guitar Pro.
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