#1
At about 1:34 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAc5PYiWJlA

If it is, can anyone identify what key it modulates from and what it goes into?
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Fender MIM Standard Strat
Fender Deluxe Reverb
Digitech Bad Monkey
Electro Harmonix Big Muff
Ernie Ball VP Junior 250k
Dunlop Cry Baby Wah
#2
It goes from A minor to A major with some cool 7th chords for color.
Great song by the way, fun to jam to.
#3
Quote by Shredworthy
It goes from A minor to A major with some cool 7th chords for color.
Great song by the way, fun to jam to.
Yeah that sounds right.

Agreed, Derek Trucks Band is amazing.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#4
Yeah, they are. So how do they modulate to that key exactly?
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Fender MIM Standard Strat
Fender Deluxe Reverb
Digitech Bad Monkey
Electro Harmonix Big Muff
Ernie Ball VP Junior 250k
Dunlop Cry Baby Wah
#5
It's usually a chord.
Quote by Tyler Durden
It's only after we've lost everything that we're free to do anything.

Erowid
#6
Quote by zapparage
Yeah, they are. So how do they modulate to that key exactly?
What do you mean? The techniques they use, or why it works theoretically?

If the former, I don't know.

If the latter, it's because they're parallel keys. Meaning, they resolve to the same note. To be specific, A minor to A major is simply a raising of three scale degrees, the third, sixth and seventh, if you're considering the strict adherence to the scales. If you're not, though, the sixth and seventh don't even need to be altered. Melodic minor (ascending) has a major sixth and seventh anyway, so that would be the alteration of only one scale degree, which is a rather simple key change. That's just an example. I'm not saying that's what happens in the song or that it's even common. I'm just saying it's possible.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea