#1
Hello.

I'm looking for a set of strings.

Up until now, i've been using Ernie Ball regular slinkies, and before that, Zakk Wylde signatures.

I'm looking for something that responds to bending, the ones i have now i have to stretch across the entire fretboard to get a change in pitch. I'd also like it if the audible difference between the bass strings and the treble strings was as low as possible, slinkies have a big difference in how clear the tone is between bass and treble, especially when i crank up some distortion.

I've been thinking of getting a set of GHS Boomer strings, heard Dave Gilmour has been using them for a long time, and that's kind of the sound i'm after.

If you have any thoughts or recommendations, please do write!

Cheers.
#4
GHS Boomers are good.


In my restless dreams...
I see that town.
Silent Hill.
You promised you'd take me there again someday.
But you never did.

Well, I'm alone there now.
In our 'special place'...
Waiting for you.

#5
D'addario 9's....tried all sorts of makes and gauges and I found these to be the best for me.... I certainly recommend them.
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#6
Allrighty then. I've checked the stock of my local dealer, and i think i'll settle on a set of Boomers and power slinkies, see which one i like best. Thanks for the pointers!
#7
Quote by Banana Wedgie
Ernie Ball Power Slinky. They are bendy responsive, more than any .38s ever will be!

This is what I'd go with as well. 11 on the high E may be a little beefy for some, but if you're cool with that, go for it.

What guitar are you putting them on?
#8
How far you have to bend in order to get a pitch change has nothing to do with what strings you use, it's to do with the tension.

If you have a TOM bridge and tailpiece, lower the tailpiece to increase tension - means less bending to pitch, but it's harder going, as the tension is higher.

Difference in tone between strings is the point...that's why people like Tony Iommi play Paranoid on the low E string, despite most tabs writing it out on the A string. Sounds thicker, which is what he's going for. But fiddling with the EQ/distortion settings on your amp can effect this as super high mids can decrease the difference, I have found.

Also, do not buy strings just cause Dave Gilmour uses them. Lots of my favourite guitarists use Ernie Ball and Dunlop strings, but I can't stand either. It also depends what type of guitar you use, as some strings work better with different fretboard woods, frets, etc.

I've found Thomastiks work REALLY well on my Strat, but are horrible on my Gibson. Other way around for D'addario and Dunlop (I know I said I can't stand them, but that's because they break on me, I like the feel).

By all means follow the recommendations you get here, but check out ALL the brands of strings you can, because different strings work for different people. They are perhaps one of the most subjective elements of guitar playing - people just don't realise it.
Last edited by gibson jack at Dec 11, 2009,
#9
^ Don't get strings because your favorite guitarist uses them. All mine use 10-46, and I hate them.

I personally use Daddario 11-49, and they are great, but I had Power Slinkies but they were not as good up top (from a death metal main playing perspective), although maintaining the amazing bends, they are better for all of metalcore's abusive pinch harmonics and bends.
#10
Quote by gibson jack
How far you have to bend in order to get a pitch change has nothing to do with what strings you use, it's to do with the tension.

If you have a TOM bridge and tailpiece, lower the tailpiece to increase tension - means less bending to pitch, but it's harder going, as the tension is higher.

Difference in tone between strings is the point...that's why people like Tony Iommi play Paranoid on the low E string, despite most tabs writing it out on the A string. Sounds thicker, which is what he's going for. But fiddling with the EQ/distortion settings on your amp can effect this as super high mids can decrease the difference, I have found.

Also, do not buy strings just cause Dave Gilmour uses them. Lots of my favourite guitarists use Ernie Ball and Dunlop strings, but I can't stand either. It also depends what type of guitar you use, as some strings work better with different fretboard woods, frets, etc.

I've found Thomastiks work REALLY well on my Strat, but are horrible on my Gibson. Other way around for D'addario and Dunlop (I know I said I can't stand them, but that's because they break on me, I like the feel).

By all means follow the recommendations you get here, but check out ALL the brands of strings you can, because different strings work for different people. They are perhaps one of the most subjective elements of guitar playing - people just don't realise it.


Thanks for the tip - my strings are indeed quite low, since i lowered a bridge a long time ago. I'll jack it up and see if it makes any difference. And yes, i do understand that what works with david gilmours setup and style of playing might be shite on crisp bread for me, which is why i asked here before i went out and bought a set of strings with a rockstars face on them
#11
Quote by Equivalence
I really like the Rotosound yellows. I tried a whole range of different strings before settling down on those, and they are now my absolute favourites.


Agreed, Rotosound Yellows are by far the best strings I've ever tried - they are all that I use now.
#12
The only way to find strings that work for you is to try everything out there. Just buy a pack of each"(over time not at once unless you have the money) and over time you will find strings that fit you. Sounds strange but there are differences. I personally hate all GHS strings. Why? The hell if I know but I do. Strings are one of the few things about guitars that is pretty cheap to experiment with.
Bhaok

The following statement is true. The proceeding statement is false.
#13
I used D’Addario for the first few years I played guitar. They always made playing guitar painful. A friend sold me on Boomers and I never went back. They’re easy on your fingers, don’t break much, and stay in tune. After you break a set in they just feel kind of silky. Some people claim that Boomers have a dull tone, but I think those people are just trying to justify they money they spend on D’Addario or Fender.
#14
Quote by DeathByGrogg


I'm looking for something that responds to bending, the ones i have now i have to stretch across the entire fretboard to get a change in pitch. I'd also like it if the audible difference between the bass strings and the treble strings was as low as possible, slinkies have a big difference in how clear the tone is between bass and treble, especially when i crank up some distortion.


Cheers.


Agreed. I just put some regular slinky's on to try, they feel great, but the treble strings are freaking loud
#15
go get the boomers, ive noticed they are very reactive to bending, hmrons and plloffs too.
#16
You should use D'Addario super light gauge. It's good for bending and all those technics the beginners learn. I personnaly use an Aria Pro II and can make punk sounds with it.