#1
has your cab been loosing its tone?

read this

quoted from the andy sneap forum


Quote by Glenn Fricker;8744794
Hey all,

The short version: I purchased a Mesa Recto cab at the beginning of 2008, and it sounded great. However, it had a slight tear in the grill cloth that would buzz & rattle. Then, to add insult to injury, I blew the best speaker in the cab while showing off how great it sounded to a client.... not so smart on my part, I can admit it...

Anyway, the cab was still under warranty, so I had it replaced with a new one... only problem was, it didn't sound anywhere nearly as good. I tried everything with this cab: Bias adjustments on the amp, different overdrive pedals, mic configurations, mic different spots on the best speakers, you name it... I've literally got pages & pages of notes. Still, it didn't sound as good as the first one.

So I bought another 4X12 from a different manufacturer, and the Mesa has been sitting there for the last 5 months, unused. I was seriously considering selling it, or trading it for something else... maybe even a new Mesa cab that sounded good.

Then, this morning, I had an idea. My best ideas always come in the morning while my head is clear.

...and that idea was so simple, it was downright stupid not to try it ages ago: Check the back of the cabinet to see if the screws are tight. After all, it's a closed back cabinet & needs that rigid back for the thing to work correctly.

Well, wouldn't you know, I could go 1-2 revolutions on every single screw.

So, I plugged in my 5150, cranked it up, and wouldn't you know.. it sounds better. A bigger bottom end, and a smoother, more extended top end. ...Like a Mesa cab SHOULD sound like. ****.

I've included several samples of the step by step evaluation process. Please excuse the horrible AC/DC ripoff riff, I was playing Rock Band 2 with the wife & couldn't get the damn riff out of my head!

All the single 57 clips have the mic in the same position.







So, the lesson here: If your tone sucks, you might have a screw loose. Don't forget to check.
#4
I read the Rock Band part and and thought "Oh noes! He is using a Rock Band mic!" but that was not the case apparently. lol

Yeah my bandmate bought a Randall 4x12 off of someone, pull off the back to realize that there was no dampening material inside. Sounds 10x better now!
"If you're looking for me,
you better check under the sea,
because that's where you'll find me..."
#6
Obvious, but something a lot of people forget.

You can also get a massive difference in tone with a bolt-on neck guitar by loosening the neck screws a 1/4 turn or so while strung to pitch (perfectly safe, but don't loosen them too much!) and then retightening them. Pulls the neck tighter into the body for better wood-on-wood contact, and worth trying if you're getting sustain problems.
#10
Quote by kyle62
Obvious, but something a lot of people forget.

You can also get a massive difference in tone with a bolt-on neck guitar by loosening the neck screws a 1/4 turn or so while strung to pitch (perfectly safe, but don't loosen them too much!) and then retightening them. Pulls the neck tighter into the body for better wood-on-wood contact, and worth trying if you're getting sustain problems.



Classic trick, works great.

First time I did this it scared the HELL out of me though!
Not only was I nervous (and dubious) about loosening a neck while under string tension (!), it makes a nice loud *snap* when it pops in the pocket.

yeeeeeeeep!

But it does make a real difference.
#11
Cool.........I always love it when it's a small thing that makes a big difference