#1
its going to be difficult to put into words exactly what I'm asking but I'll give it a shot.

Jimi Hendrix style chord improvisation rhythm playing... I wanna know how to do it around Barre chords.

Say for example I want to improvise around an E barre chord rooted on the 5th string (fret 7), what notes around there can I play. is there some sort of movable scale that depends on where the bar is located? The notes must also differ for minor barre chords. where do I start?
#2
You are sort of right. Over a minor say rooted on A at the 6th string root you could play basically double stops based around the typical minor pentatonic - specifically effective on the 5th 4th and 3rd strings

If you played instead an A Major triad 6th string root you could use those same strings and that pattern, but now raise them up a whole step and do the same embellishment rhythm - this is a simple approach, but is by no means complete - it will, however get you started out.
#4
Learn the notes on the fretboard, then you'll know what notes are there and you can match them up with a scale. The fact that it's a barre chord doesn't really mean anything, ultimately chords and scales are just different ways of arranging the same things.

To keep things really simple - if you're playing over an E major chord then use the E major scale, if you're playing over E minor then use the E minor scale. An easy way to approach it is to think of it as playing fragments of chords but knowing the notes on the fretboard is vital.
Actually called Mark!

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Last edited by steven seagull at Dec 11, 2009,
#5
usually he would go into the major pentatonic with what you described there. the major pentatonic is pretty easy to go into from a root 5 barre chord. with root 6, he usually fretted with the thumb and used his pinky to embelish the chords. you can also go into the major pentatonic if you want but. obviously if its a minor chord you use the minor pentatonic instead. you could also use the minor pent over a major chord if you want it to sound bluesy.

anyways, thats pretty much it. just learn some of his songs and learn some of his common licks and you should be able to see what hes doing. its not much more than what i said. learning some inversions helps too to "slide" into the major pentatonic which i do a lot. for example:

e x
B 5
G 5
D 5
A 3
E x

e x
B 5
D 5
G 5
A 7
E x

now with this inversion you are in perfect position to play the major pentatonic.

on the 6th string its like:

e 5
B 5
G 6
D 7
A x
E 5

use your pinky to fret the 7th fret on the e, B, or G string. OR,

e x
B x
G 9
D 7
A 7
E 9

so again, you can go into the major pentatonic this way. and what i mean by that if you didnt understand, is that you are using the major pentatonic for that one chord. so in axis bold as love, the song is in A, but over the D chord he can play in D major instead of A major and B minor over the B minor. hopefully that helps
#6
Your instinct is right and both Blind In One Ear and Sean0913 know of what they speak
(and as usual, you can ignore the seagull in the picture)
#7
I've always viewed Hendrix's melodic rhythm technique as a variation on the standard barre chord. What he's really doing is hammering on/pulling off of various extensions of the chord he's playing to add a bit of motion to his harmony..

The CAGED method, in this case, really shines.. Once you know how the lead notes relate to the chord you're working with properly, it becomes simple to figure out the fun widdly bits Hendrix was so fond of. It's a really interesting technique, and I wish you luck in pursuing it.

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/

This website really helped me out.. It's extremely helpful to analyze chord shapes in the greater context of a scalar pattern and honestly, the Hendrix ornaments were sort of the tip of the iceberg of chord/melody playing.
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I just learn the formula, apply it to a key, and use said notes on fretboard. Why? Cuz I'm not a pussy.
#8
Quote by guitarviz
Your instinct is right and both Blind In One Ear and Sean0913 know of what they speak
(and as usual, you can ignore the seagull in the picture)

so you're saying i'm wrong?
Actually called Mark!

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People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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#9
justinguitar.com

2 lessons on Jimi Hendrix Rhythm Thumb-Over style

and check out his song lessons for application of this technique
Under The Bridge - RHCP
Little Wing - Jimi
The Wind Cries Mary- Jimi
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#10
Steven Seagull, er, Mark, told the TS to the learn the fretboard, the notes, and the theory behind it.. I don't see how thats bad advice at all.
Concerning this subject, my only advice is that you should learn some more advanced chord voicings, if you want to sound interesting, those can show you the notes to hammer on to and so forth.
#11
Quote by SaulnierE
Steven Seagull, er, Mark, told the TS to the learn the fretboard, the notes, and the theory behind it.. I don't see how thats bad advice at all.
Concerning this subject, my only advice is that you should learn some more advanced chord voicings, if you want to sound interesting, those can show you the notes to hammer on to and so forth.

not that it wont help, but thats not needed. i was doing hendrix style rhythm before i learned any advanced voicings. if you know the major and minor pentatonic/major and minor scale, and know a couple of voicings of basic chords, and the two inversions i showed, you can do it. actually, i did those inversions before i knew they were inversions. remember, hendrix played blues/rock. the chords arent that advanced.

also, i forgot to mention to learn some harmonizing. try harmonizing the major/minor scale in 6ths. ive heard hendrix do this at times. i think he does it on bold as love. keep it on the higher strings.
#12
Funny, I got my head round Hendrix's playing the other way, once i'd learned the basics of theory ie notes, major scale and chord progressions then it was blindingly obvious that all he was doing was embellishing a basic chord shape with additional scale tones. The mechanics of it became irrelevant, it was simply a case of adding or substracting the odd note here and there - theory was what demystified it for me.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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#13
Quote by steven seagull
Funny, I got my head round Hendrix's playing the other way, once i'd learned the basics of theory ie notes, major scale and chord progressions then it was blindingly obvious that all he was doing was embellishing a basic chord shape with additional scale tones. The mechanics of it became irrelevant, it was simply a case of adding or substracting the odd note here and there - theory was what demystified it for me.

either way will work i guess. it depends on the person and how they learn. i think when i was starting out i didnt want much to do with theory. i just played what i heard and i found out the theory of it later.