#1
I want to start learning songs by ear, but Im also considering to start buying more vinyls/CDs to learn off of. This may seem silly, but I want to learn the same way many of my favorite msucisians learned. If they could learn just from listening to the music from those types of media format, it kinda inspired me to do the same. So how would do so like slow down the music and etc...?

Thanks, and if any clarification is needded I'll be more than glad to help.
#4
It's how Wes Montgomery learned.

I've gotten really lazy about training my ear lately. I should force myself to transcribe stuff.
#5
There are some programs that slow down MP3's, but I'm not sure of which do it, but I know they exist. I just really listen to it and find the tonal center or if I recognize a chord I see if it's right or not. It's just a matter of work and it gets easier over time. One thing that helps is the solfege(Is that how you spell it?).

Hit a note and hum it. Over time your ear will get better. As advice that was given to me a few months ago, don't try to learn a big guitar solo at first, as it won't help you at all. Learn something that is fairly easy by ear and work your way up. It's the same way with sightreading.
#6
Audacity changes speed, tempo, pitch, removes vocals...

and why do people call records 'vinyls'?? I don't call CD's 'plastics'.

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#7
Tommy Emanuel stacked coins on top of his vinyl to slow it down, but it got messed up over time.

EDIT: ^ It's because plastics already has a different connotation.
EDIT2: Dammit, no it doesn't. What the hell am I thinking?
EDIT3: I should change my post to say record then, instead of vinyl.
EDIT4: Nah, nevermind, I'm too lazy...
Last edited by denfilade at Dec 12, 2009,
#8
Quote by swordsman14
So how would do so like slow down the music and etc...?

Nup, you just listen to the same bar over and over again, practising it until you've got it down pat. The people who inspired you to do it just popped the vinyl on a record player and repeated it over and over again - my guitar teacher has old vinyl records, and you can see the places where the guitar solos are because those places are so worn down
#9
I could you Audacity, but its more of the experience and feel I want to get from learning off vinyls and CDs by ear. Like some of my favorite guitarists to name some are Terrance Hobbs, Doug Cerrito, Dimebag, Kerry King/Jeff Hanneman, Chuck Schuldiner, Max Cavalera, Bill Steer, Trey Azagathoth and many others I want to try out the same way they probably learned by, by probably listening to music on vinyls and CDs so that made me wonder if they as great as they are now can learn from those types of music formats why can't I? So please guys help me out here.

Thanks
#10
I remember learning this way. I took lessons for 6 months to start off with, my teacher gave me the tools I needed to start picking up tunes by ear, and after being taken out of guitar lessons for bad grades, I took upon copying off my tapes and record albums.

I remember wearing out the grooves in my $1 Cars albums trying to learn the synth solo to "Running to You" on guitar, or the guitar solo from "Just What I Needed", I'd listen to those albums 3 years later and all those sections were so degraded in sound quality from being played over and over again it was crazy.

Much of learning from tapes or records is picking out stuff that's slow enough for you to pick up on, but building up the speed at which your ear can recognize the pitch of the notes. By about the 4th year I was picking out ZZ Top solos note for note, and about a year and a half later, I was sitting in my room playing Van-Halen songs over and over on my Discman with my guitar amp's headphones on over the Discman's headphones.

These days I do slow stuff down using Winamp and various slow-down plugins (Roni Music Slow-Me Down, PaceMaker Tempo Controller), but I find at times due to the mix of the album, the sound quality degrades somewhat making more subtle things harder to pick out at times.
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#12
I dont see why learning off of vinyl would be any different from mp3's, just get high quality ones.
[img]http://cdn.gs.uproxx.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/v.gif[/img]
#13
Quote by swordsman14
So do you guys think this would be a great idea of learning by ear just wondering?

It's a great idea, a good ear is the best thing a rock n' roll guitarist can have in his arsenal IMO. Even if you don't do it for every song you learn, exercising your ear by learning the occasional song without tabs or manuscript is a good habit.

edit:
Quote by JAHellraiser
I dont see why learning off of vinyl would be any different from mp3's, just get high quality ones.

He's basically said that it's the experience, which is fair enough - there's nothing more genuine than sitting in front of a gramophone with your guitar and amp, practising that phrase over and over until you get it sounding just like the record.
Last edited by kenan6346 at Dec 12, 2009,
#14
Why don't you just take lessons, write your own music and learn songs by tabs/sheet music? It seems like you're exacerbating the learning process by only learning songs by ear.
#15
Quote by kenan6346
It's a great idea, a good ear is the best thing a rock n' roll guitarist can have in his arsenal IMO. Even if you don't do it for every song you learn, exercising your ear by learning the occasional song without tabs or manuscript is a good habit.

edit:

He's basically said that it's the experience, which is fair enough - there's nothing more genuine than sitting in front of a gramophone with your guitar and amp, practising that phrase over and over until you get it sounding just like the record.

Yeah you gots exactly what I mean, I want to go through a similar process on how my favorite guitarists went through to get great, but I was wondering how do I slow down songs to learn them note by note?