#1
Hey guys

Just wondering what kind of costs I'd be looking at for a simple drum kit recording setup for here at home. I was wondering if I could get away with 2 overhead condenser mics for a start. Would that get me a decent quality? Also, how much of a part would acoustics play? I have my kit setup in a small room in our house, it isn't soundproofed, has a carpet floor, is full of furniture and 1 corner or so is windowed. Is it even worth bothering to try with such a bad setup?

Thanks!
#2
not going to get great quality with just 2 condensers, probably a thin and not very full sound. but it is worth it because once you are experience with how to get your condensers to sound good you can start eventually experimenting with other mics. room plays a really big role, but to each his own, if you like the acoustics in your room and think they would fit the recording, go for it. You gotta start small, 2 condensers is probably a good start, for a beginner starting off with a full drum mic'ing kit is never fun, if you've never mic'd drums before.
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#3
you well definitely get that room sound in there, especially with just overheads, but that doesn't mean it's not worth it. it's up to you. if you're only happy with perfection, then probably not.

you'll at least need a kick mic with those overheads. i would also suggest snare and hi hat mics.

there is a pretty sweet technique that only uses 4 or 5 mics that pro's use sometimes (bob dylan for one...) might be worth looking that up just to get some ideas.
#4
Yeah I was just wondering what I should start with and then add onto the setup over time. It's a home recording so I know it's never going to be perfect, it'd just be great to be able to ditch the programmed drums. What kind of mics should I be looking at brandwise?
#6
That's surprisingly cheap, I was expecting to be paying a few hundred per mic
What would the sound quality be like, though?
#7
Quote by Drummerrrrr?
That's surprisingly cheap, I was expecting to be paying a few hundred per mic
What would the sound quality be like, though?


If you look at a few of the sets MF has, they can get pricey (Like $400 for a nice set of Shures that I wouldn't mind having). With the reviews I've read on them, they sound like decent mics for the price. For starting out recording, they are a good cheap bundle to get started.
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#9
Shure has always made solid mics IMO. You usually cant go wrong with a good set of Shures. After wandering around the web a bit, all but one of the reviews comes back positive (Theres always that one person who doesn't like it :p). If you've got the money, go for the Shures. That way, you've got something great that will last you a long time.
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#10
So I think I might go with the Shure's when I have the dosh, thanks for the help ;D

Last thing - again, how much will the acoustics of the room affect the recordings? And is there any way I can fix it? I've been thinking about pulling everything out of the room except my kit/guitars .etc and then covering up the windows. We have plaster board walls, will this cause any trouble?
#11
well you will need to make your walls so the ate not parrallel to avoid standing waves if you windows are multipanes put some crystals at the botom
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#12
A pair of condensers will work perfectly well if you have a well-tuned, quality kit, a nice sounding room, and are looking for more of a rock/blues/funk sound.
For other styles, or for a drier sound, you'll need to be close-micing the snare and kick at very least.
#13
Quote by Drummerrrrr?

Last thing - again, how much will the acoustics of the room affect the recordings?


Hugely,

those 2 overheads will be picking up a lot of room sound,
its the unfortunate nature of recording live drums, the room is a huge part of getting a good final sound.

you8 could do some decent DIY acoustic treatment in the $100-200 price range, make a few bass traps and some broadband absorbers for the walls and ceiling.

do some reading on this forum:

http://www.johnlsayers.com/phpBB2/index.php