#1
Hi People,

Just a quick question to get some info.

I have tried to get on with learning acoustic guitar but really can't do it.

I am thinking of getting an electric and trying with that or changing over to a bass.

My main influencies are blues, BB King, Eric Clapton , SRV etc

The question is should I go with electric lead or change to bass and try that ?

Any advice will be welcome

#2
An electric guitar can be rythm also, and if you have an hard time learn acoustic, I can't see how electric would be easyer, exept for the fact that it's more smooth for the finger. If you find that an acoustic is too much hard for you're finger, don't even think of a bass.
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#3
Quote by naforrester
Hi People,

Just a quick question to get some info.

I have tried to get on with learning acoustic guitar but really can't do it.

I am thinking of getting an electric and trying with that or changing over to a bass.

My main influencies are blues, BB King, Eric Clapton , SRV etc

The question is should I go with electric lead or change to bass and try that ?

Any advice will be welcome


Depends on why you "really can't do it".

If it's because playing lead guitar parts (AKA guitar riffs/solos) feels too awkward, then some of that is due to your guitar being an acoustic. Most beginner acoustics were designed to be beater guitars, not shred machines. The neck radius is usually different, the action is usually higher, most people use (or should use) far thicker string gauges, the strings themselves are usually made of harder metals, and the neck will usually be a little chunkier/thicker. Meaning that anything past chords is going to be difficult to play on a beginner's acoustic. The notes may be the same on acoustics and electrics, but the play is definitely not. If that's the case and you want to keep learning lead guitar, try getting an electric.

If it's because you just don't have the finger strength to do it, then keep at it. I don't consider anybody who can't play a barre chord cleanly and effortlessly to be anything past a novice. There's nothing wrong with that, but it just means that your finger strength hasn't developed enough to be able to play efficiently.

WHAT HAVE YOU DONE
#4
Thanks for the replies.

The main problem I feel is written in the post from Musical Minority.
That and it just feels awkward....but that might be my stomach getting in the way !!

I am trying to follow a book from Phil Capone but it just doesn't seem to feel comfortable.

I will persevere for a couple of months more and see what happens.
#5
Quote by naforrester
Thanks for the replies.

The main problem I feel is written in the post from Musical Minority.
That and it just feels awkward....but that might be my stomach getting in the way !!

I am trying to follow a book from Phil Capone but it just doesn't seem to feel comfortable.

I will persevere for a couple of months more and see what happens.


You could always try some different books.

Hal Leonard or something.

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#6
I sort of remember that the Concert series were 300W monsters, where the Betas were 100W into 4 ohms - that extra headroom makes a world of difference, especially for Bass applications.

There is no reason you couldn't use the Concert preamp for Bass - the tone controls will be a little off from where you want them (too high in frequency), but a graphic EQ pedal in the loop (is there one? I don't recall) will take care of that. I suppose you could see about fiddling a Beta Bass preamp channel into the Concert circuit - that might be fun.

The Beta Lead was the only solid-state guitar amp I ever liked - take an ES-345 with 'stereo' outputs (really one output per pickup) and give each PU its own channel. Worked real nice.
#7
Quote by NoiNoo
I sort of remember that the Concert series were 300W monsters, where the Betas were 100W into 4 ohms - that extra headroom makes a world of difference, especially for Bass applications.

There is no reason you couldn't use the Concert preamp for Bass - the tone controls will be a little off from where you want them (too high in frequency), but a graphic EQ pedal in the loop (is there one? I don't recall) will take care of that. I suppose you could see about fiddling a Beta Bass preamp channel into the Concert circuit - that might be fun.

The Beta Lead was the only solid-state guitar amp I ever liked - take an ES-345 with 'stereo' outputs (really one output per pickup) and give each PU its own channel. Worked real nice.

I wanna report this, but I'm not even sure what to classify it as. Is insanity a good enough reason to report a post?

Anywho getting back on topic now. TS, I would say rent an electric for a month or so just to see how it feels. It's generally easier to play, in that it's smaller than an acoustic, but it will probably still feel a bit awkward. Give it a try and see how it fits you.
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Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.