#1
Hey everyone, I want to get into classical guitar, but I don't want to make a large investment until I get the hang of it. I've been playing guitar for about 3 years, and I really want to start playing classical.

I looked a cheap classical guitar on RondoMusic.com, and I was wondering if I should get this one or maybe pony up some more cash for a basic starter classical.

http://www.rondomusic.com/product1712.html

any other tips to starting playing classical guitar would be great too, thanks.
#2
Quote by CerebralEdge
Hey everyone, I want to get into classical guitar, but I don't want to make a large investment until I get the hang of it. I've been playing guitar for about 3 years, and I really want to start playing classical.

I looked a cheap classical guitar on RondoMusic.com, and I was wondering if I should get this one or maybe pony up some more cash for a basic starter classical.

http://www.rondomusic.com/product1712.html

any other tips to starting playing classical guitar would be great too, thanks.


I can't speak for that guitar in particular, but usually "starter kits" like that tend to be poor quality. I have heard good things about Yamaha classical guitars, and in fact I just got one (am getting one) for Christmas. Mine was about $200, but I think there might be some that were like $130 or so..
#3
Well, for classical guitar, you have to have fingernails on your right hand; not too long, but they do have to stick out a certain distance beyond your fingertips. Also...be sure you're able to read standard notation; you know, sheet music. If not, no classical guitarist will be able to take you seriously. You'll probably want to go with the traditional cedar top if you're getting a classical guitar, or so I'm told.

and upon looking at your link....$40 is not going to get you a good guitar. You'll at least want something with a solid top, which will cost probably $230 AT THE LEAST for a YAMAHA (which are excellent guitars for the value).
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#4
Quote by clayonfire
you have to have fingernails on your right hand...be sure you're able to read standard notation


i disagree. there are a ton of players out there who grow calluses on their fingerpicking hand. and unless you're trying to get into a music school i don't think it's essential to know how to read music. it'll definitely help (and it's extremely typical for classical guitarists to be able to) but i think TAB is getting to be so common you won't have too many problems.

would definitely be a great idea to try to teach yourself to read music if you cant already, though. but the finger nails thing i don't think is very mandatory. thats your preference though.

anyway, about the cheap guitar; i've always thought you could find a decent playing classical that was affordable much more easily than you can find a great playing but inexpensive steel string. could just be that higher action doesn't bother me on a classical because the nylon strings aren't as painful on the finger tips. i'd definitely try to pick one out in store though!
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#5
Quote by LifeIsABullet16
i disagree. there are a ton of players out there who grow calluses on their fingerpicking hand. and unless you're trying to get into a music school i don't think it's essential to know how to read music. it'll definitely help (and it's extremely typical for classical guitarists to be able to) but i think TAB is getting to be so common you won't have too many problems.


An extremely important part of being a classical guitarist is having the right fingernail length and shape. It's how you develop tone and color. There are some players who do not play with nails, but they usually aren't taken seriously. Tarrega played with extremely short to no nails at all, but he was one of the pioneers so he was able to get away with it. You wouldnt be able to these days. I would not take a classical guitarist seriously if he couldnt read sheet music, I am in music school but part of being a musician is being able to read music. It's like claiming to be a Spaniard without being able to speak spanish, it just doesnt make sense. there are many things that are in sheet music that arent in TAB, such as dynamics rythms tempos and colors. You need to be able to decipher all of those in sheet music if you want to consider yourself to be a classical guitarist. None of it, however, comes immediately. It takes time and practice to be able to develop it. And thats part of the beauty of playing classical music, is the effort, time, and heart you put into every little detail. No matter how long it takes.
#6
lol

Buy a decent classical guitar and play what you want. Don't let these guys bog you down just because you asked what kind of guitar to buy. The rest comes later.
#7
I'm not too worried about playing a shitty guitar, If i want to upgrade later I will, besides 40 bucks is nothing. I know how to read some sheet music, I'm taking violin and guitar classes in my school, so I know how to read treble clef. As for the finger nails, is there any particular shape they have to be?

EDIT: Anyone know what kind of tonal differences there are between spruce and cedar, because I found some other guitars on Rondomusic that have spruce and cedar tops for around $100.
Last edited by CerebralEdge at Dec 13, 2009,
#8
Quote by CerebralEdge
I'm not too worried about playing a shitty guitar, If i want to upgrade later I will, besides 40 bucks is nothing. I know how to read some sheet music, I'm taking violin and guitar classes in my school, so I know how to read treble clef. As for the finger nails, is there any particular shape they have to be?

EDIT: Anyone know what kind of tonal differences there are between spruce and cedar, because I found some other guitars on Rondomusic that have spruce and cedar tops for around $100.


I was in the same position. I bought spruce. Not sure what the difference is, but everyone seemed to suggest spruce. I'm sure yahoo can find some answers for you.