#1
So, this question is about the combination of a mic and an axe.

Epiphone Les Paul - Peavey Bandit 112
Shure BF 4.2 Microphone - Line 6 Spider III 15w


I was settin' up for practice for a gig and right before I started playing the guitar, I leaned up the mic and suddenly the guitar amp gave this insane feedback straight from the depths of Hell. Even while I was playing and singing the feedback was fading in and out. The only way to stop it was to get away from the mic. But I'm the singer/guitarist for the band. What do you think I should do?
#2
don't plug a mic into a guitar amp. problem solved
www.myspace.com/decognition

Guitar Rig:
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Godin Freeway
Korg DTR2000 Tuner
Axon Ax100
Hughes & Kettner Triamp Mk||
Boss V-Wah, CE-5, TR-2

Bass Rig:
Ibanez sr700
Ampeg BA600/115
Boss MT-2
#3
Ok, I didn't know if you needed a mic amp or anything. I assumed it work through a guitar amp.
#4
it works, but because a guitar loudspeaker isn't full range, you have to have way more gain to be able to hear it properly. thus feedback

get yourself something like a yorkville nx55p
www.myspace.com/decognition

Guitar Rig:
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Godin Freeway
Korg DTR2000 Tuner
Axon Ax100
Hughes & Kettner Triamp Mk||
Boss V-Wah, CE-5, TR-2

Bass Rig:
Ibanez sr700
Ampeg BA600/115
Boss MT-2
Last edited by viper_mike at Dec 12, 2009,
#6
Quote by viper_mike
it works, but because a guitar loudspeaker isn't full range, you have to have way more gain to be able to hear it properly. thus feedback

get yourself something like a yorkville nx55p

Plus he'll blow the speaker sometime. Of course, it is a Spider III, but still, a keyboard amp or a PA system would ultimately be better.
#7
Dude, get ride of the spider lol. I got one and I'm trying so hard to get rid of it. But yeah you need a P.A. the amp is to small for that