#1
Everything is just sounding the same, I want something evil sounding and not so ordinary. something heavy. I play in E standard.

suggestions?
#2
Use minor scales/progressions.
Quote by Tyler Durden
It's only after we've lost everything that we're free to do anything.

Erowid
#4
Quote by athlete1
drop a whole step down and play in D phrygian dominant?



because down tuning and playing in an unfamiliar mode will totally help someone who's having trouble in the normal scales.


TS. I say stick to minor and just keep trying, and don't be afraid to go out of key. If you want something creepy sounding dissonant stuff helps a lot. play with tritones, minor seconds, and major 7ths, but while keeping your normal minor scale notes. try chord extensions that don't quite fit and try to get them to add to the mood.

also, play around with the rhythm. it can have a huge affect on the mood. again, play with stuff that might temporarily throw the listener off guard, slight variations that don't follow the flow, etc.

of course, with all of this you have to have taste in how much you go on with the dissonance and tension. too much and it starts to sound like a mess.
#5
Yea, to start, it's kind of hard getting something to sound real heavy and evil in E standard. If you're trying to play like death metal, at least drop D or drop C. Use minor scales and tritones but don't limit yourself to that.
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#6
I doubt he knows what a tritone or a mode is... He sounds like quite a beginner.

Seriously, just tune to drop d and mess around.
#7
Quote by Souls United
I doubt he knows what a tritone or a mode is... He sounds like quite a beginner.

Seriously, just tune to drop d and mess around.

Oh...right.

Step one: Tune to drop D

Step two: Play the open D chord

Step three: Play the chord on the 6th fret

Step four: ?????

Step five: Profit!!!
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#8
Quote by QuantumMechanix
Oh...right.

Step one: Tune to drop D

Step two: Play the open D chord

Step three: Play the chord on the 6th fret

Step four: ?????

Step five: Profit!!!


its a start. really, i probably got a good majority of my learning from messing around. its only been recently that ive started learning theory and knowing the names of things that i do on guitar. plus even playing some heavy rhythm parts in drop d will help a beginner built skills such as palm muting and stuff like that.

telling them that tritones sound heavy, or to use a d phrygian dominant mode wont probably help.
#9
Can someone explain this tritone? I looked it up on wikipedia and have heard of it before...so it would be like three whole tones? so like A-B-C? all played together?
#12
Quote by The4thHorsemen
because down tuning and playing in an unfamiliar mode will totally help someone who's having trouble in the normal scales.


TS. I say stick to minor and just keep trying, and don't be afraid to go out of key. If you want something creepy sounding dissonant stuff helps a lot. play with tritones, minor seconds, and major 7ths, but while keeping your normal minor scale notes. try chord extensions that don't quite fit and try to get them to add to the mood.

also, play around with the rhythm. it can have a huge affect on the mood. again, play with stuff that might temporarily throw the listener off guard, slight variations that don't follow the flow, etc.

of course, with all of this you have to have taste in how much you go on with the dissonance and tension. too much and it starts to sound like a mess.



I dont know what on Earth your talking about, and I'm an experienced guitar player.
So I doubt TS understands your Theory gibberish, cause I dont.

Ts, drop tune your Low E to D and hold the EAD strings down on one fret and move it around, this will help you improve your rythem and help you understand how to form riffs better, since you cant sound bad playing drop D power chords, unless your retarted. But mainly, just **** around constantly till you find something that sounds cool then pratice the hell out of it. Then do it all over again.
#13
I would suggest for evil sounding chords, a power chord set based upon the tritone. You have it partially right, the tritone is 3 whole steps from the note. So, an E to F# to G# to A# is a tritone.

In other words, you could play power chords in E and A# and that's a power chord set built off the root and the tritone, and you might find that b5 is pretty evil sounding. Also a m2 interval is pretty good, this is simply a 1 fret change, so E to F for example, is a pretty common interval used with chords in heavy power chord driven music.
Last edited by Sean0913 at Dec 13, 2009,
#14
Quote by ethan_hanus
I dont know what on Earth your talking about, and I'm an experienced guitar player.
So I doubt TS understands your Theory gibberish, cause I dont.

Ts, drop tune your Low E to D and hold the EAD strings down on one fret and move it around, this will help you improve your rythem and help you understand how to form riffs better, since you cant sound bad playing drop D power chords, unless your retarted. But mainly, just **** around constantly till you find something that sounds cool then pratice the hell out of it. Then do it all over again.




He was speaking of basic theory, such as intervals, if you don't know what tritones, major sevenths and the like are, go back to the basics of theory.

TC, pretty much don't worry about sticking to scales for writing metal, all forms of accidentals are used frequently, adding b2, major 7, #4 and various other dissonant intervals help. Even various major intervals like thirds and sixths can sound quite "evil" in the right context.

Also, I suggest looking into learning the diminished scale. Its a symmetrical scale that goes I - bII - bIII - III - #IV - V - VI - VII, or in the key of E ; E - F - G - G# - A# - B - C# - D - E. It can sound quite odd too most ears and is used in alot of grindcore, black metal and death metal, as well as jazz. And throwing the odd jazz break into a metal song is always appreciated.
#15
I find a power chord, to a minor sixth built off the same root can sound quite heavy. Like so:

A-4-4-4-4-5-5-5-5
E-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2


The best thing to do though, would be to learn other people's songs that have the heavy sound you want, and then figure out what makes those parts sound the way they do, and try to use that. People typically remember things better that they have learned themselves, rather than things they've just been told.

Quote by MadAudioMan
Also, I suggest looking into learning the diminished scale. Its a symmetrical scale that goes I - bII - bIII - III - #IV - V - VI - VII, or in the key of E ; E - F - G - G# - A# - B - C# - D - E. It can sound quite odd too most ears and is used in alot of grindcore, black metal and death metal, as well as jazz. And throwing the odd jazz break into a metal song is always appreciated.


Typically roman numerals are reserved for chords, with the upper case numerals referring to major chords. You wanted to list scale degrees, and you should use arabic numerals for that. The half-whole diminished scales is: 1 ♭2 ♭3 ♮3 ♯4 5 6 ♭7.
Last edited by isaac_bandits at Dec 13, 2009,
#16
Quote by isaac_bandits
I find a power chord, to a minor sixth built off the same root can sound quite heavy. Like so:

A-4-4-4-4-5-5-5-5
E-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2


The best thing to do though, would be to learn other people's songs that have the heavy sound you want, and then figure out what makes those parts sound the way they do, and try to use that. People typically remember things better that they have learned themselves, rather than things they've just been told.


Typically roman numerals are reserved for chords, with the upper case numerals referring to major chords. You wanted to list scale degrees, and you should use arabic numerals for that. The half-whole diminished scales is: 1 ♭2 ♭3 ♮3 ♯4 5 6 ♭7.


This interval ^ ^ could also be used to suggest a #5 or an augmented 'powerchord' and you are right, it can sound pretty cool. (but a power chord has no 3rd so it's not definitively an augmented triad)

Also, playing a power chord and moving the 5 back a half step, is a pretty cool heavy powerchord move. For an example of this idea in C, listen to The C to C(b5) intro of Joe Satriani's "Crushing Day".
#17
Quote by Sean0913
This interval ^ ^ could also be used to suggest a #5 or an augmented 'powerchord' and you are right, it can sound pretty cool. (but a power chord has no 3rd so it's not definitively an augmented triad)


Yeah, just most of the time it will be the ♭6 since that comes up very frequently in a minor key.
#18
Quote by MadAudioMan


He was speaking of basic theory, such as intervals, if you don't know what tritones, major sevenths and the like are, go back to the basics of theory.

TC, pretty much don't worry about sticking to scales for writing metal, all forms of accidentals are used frequently, adding b2, major 7, #4 and various other dissonant intervals help. Even various major intervals like thirds and sixths can sound quite "evil" in the right context.

Also, I suggest looking into learning the diminished scale. Its a symmetrical scale that goes I - bII - bIII - III - #IV - V - VI - VII, or in the key of E ; E - F - G - G# - A# - B - C# - D - E. It can sound quite odd too most ears and is used in alot of grindcore, black metal and death metal, as well as jazz. And throwing the odd jazz break into a metal song is always appreciated.



Since when did I ever say I knew any theory
Can ya'll simplfy it for the guy so I can understand as well?
#19
Quote by ethan_hanus
Since when did I ever say I knew any theory
Can ya'll simplfy it for the guy so I can understand as well?


Part of your reasons for having the questions you have, and not knowing the answers in the first place, may be caused due to your lack of knowledge of theory.

I realize that what has been suggested to you may look a lot like Egyptian hieroglyphics when it comes to making sense of it all. But the information itself, is accurate. When you come asking matters of theory, you should understand that it has a language all its own.

There are other examples in the topic that use less of the language, but what would help you the most, would ultimately be to learn theory.
#20
Quote by isaac_bandits
I find a power chord, to a minor sixth built off the same root can sound quite heavy. Like so:

A-4-4-4-4-5-5-5-5
E-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2

lol

That is somewhat part of the main riff of a song I'm writing.
Quote by Tyler Durden
It's only after we've lost everything that we're free to do anything.

Erowid
#21
Quote by RockGuitar92
lol

That is somewhat part of the main riff of a song I'm writing.


It doesn't surprise me, its a fairly common thing to play in a minor key.
#22
Quote by isaac_bandits
It doesn't surprise me, its a fairly common thing to play in a minor key.


Yeah, I'm only writing a simple song. Very punk/alternative sound.
Quote by Tyler Durden
It's only after we've lost everything that we're free to do anything.

Erowid