#1
Sometime this week I’ll be getting my Shecter Blackjack C-1 EX (did they make that name long enough) baritone out of layaway. I’m getting it because I really want to explore those deep tunings and the luscious timbre that baritones produce. Anyway, I haven’t found much reading material about baritones, and Schecter’s web site sucks, so what can you tell me about playing and maintaining this thing? I’m especially interested in knowing what kind of strings go well with baritones; I love GHS Boomer Extra Lights on my Strat and would like recommendations for appropriate GHS strings for baritone.
#2
All I really have to say is; you bastard. I have always wanted a baritone.
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because that's where you'll find me..."
#3
take it to the EG forum?
I shouldn't post when drunk..



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#4
Quote by DeathByDestroyr
All I really have to say is; you bastard. I have always wanted a baritone.


I lucked out: the Guitar Center was selling all it’s Schecter baritones for $399 to make room for new stock.

Sorry about posting this in gear.
#5
#6
I considered the Agile guitars, but as I wrote above, I’m getting a great deal on this Schecter—less than the cost of an Agile, no shipping, and I got to try it out in the store. I also don’t like that with the Agile I have to get a Les Paul body if I only want two pickups.
#7
nothing much different than a normal guitar...I usually just buy a 7-string set of strings and not use the top string on my baritone. And I keep it in standard baritone tuning B E A D F♯ B or drop the B to an A.... A E A D F♯ B
#8
Well, the basic things one can expect from an extended scale on a guitar is increased tension. This can allow you to use really light guage strings and still maintain a good tension on them (some guitarists find this handy for lead work on 7-string guitars), or that you can use heavier guage strings and get a really thick tone (but these factors do depend on your amp and other gear in your rig as well). The distance between frets is greater, so some chordes and stretches are going to be more work now than they were before. Tuning wise, it's all just as your choice. Most are tuned to somewhere in the B-A tunings, popularly Drop-A and Drop-B.
#9
I have a baritone, I would recommend buying a capo if you don't have one, that way you can put it on the first couple frets and get some really cool chords out of it.
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#10
Buying a baritone. What do I need to know?


Everyone will hate you when you can tune up or down without changing string gauges.
#11
Quote by StringAssassin
Everyone will hate you when you can tune up or down without changing string gauges.


Exactly my plan. I’m getting back to playing and now that I’m in my thirties I have NO desire to maintain a collection of guitars in different tunings.