#1
do you use scales? if so, what types of scales? what other types of technique? and what type of music do you play? im just trying to get some different ideas from different individuals, not looking for anything specific.
#3
Mess around and improv until I hear something cool. Sometimes I mess with tunings and randomly play songs in different tunings to see what stuff sounds like.
#4
I usually write my lyrics first, and then end up having to fit chords to them. It works alright, but often frustrates me as I'm in a bit of a chord rut right now.
#5
Quote by mr.minney
do you use scales? if so, what types of scales? what other types of technique? and what type of music do you play? im just trying to get some different ideas from different individuals, not looking for anything specific.


I just play whatever comes to me. I don't sit down and say "I'm going to play in F minor now" or anything like that. I write something, and then I analyze to find out what I was doing, and then I can use that information to add other parts which will work well.
#6
i just wait til i hear a guitar part in my head, and i put it onto the guitar, i also piece together random notes although it is a pretty lazy way to make music.
#7
Quote by st.stephen
I usually write my lyrics first, and then end up having to fit chords to them. It works alright, but often frustrates me as I'm in a bit of a chord rut right now.

really? i do the opposite
#8
This may be in the wrong thread. I'll let someone else decide.

It may seem juvenile, but i pretty much just mess around until i start hearing something i like. The most technical i get is picking a key, and starting from there.

I know my scales pretty well, but generally i'll just pluck random notes until i find a cool sounding riff, seeing as how its usually pretty easy to tell when you break out of a nice sounding scale. (I call them 'what-the-f*** notes').

I play alternative/rock/garage type music.

As far as songs go, i do like writing vocals for them, but i try not to focus on em. Sure, i love a good poppy catchy tune, but i prefer trippy, minimal vocals over all. I kind of go stream of conciousness.

Best way to write lyrics: get microsoft word open, or a pen and paper (god forbid), close your eyes and continuously write the first words and images that come to mind. People will think you're into heavy drugs, and you'll feel creative....without having to dip into heavy drugs!

edit: in retrospect, not sure what the benefits are to people thinking you're into heavy drugs. but i thought it was worth mentioning.
Yeah, uh-huh...that's what they all say.
Last edited by BassFishin at Dec 14, 2009,
#10
Quote by dlguitarmaster7
really? i do the opposite

Yeah, to each his own right? I have written songs or segments of songs to already written chord progressions, and I've really liked the way those sounded, plus the rhythm of the words all works with the chords. I end up writing lyrics more than chord progressions a lot of the time though, so I just find it easier to make up progressions to fit the words.
#11
well some times i just mess around until i find something that sounds nice build around it
a few times i actually sat there and actually tried to write, it sounded forced
but usually something just comes to me
once i wrote a song in my sleep freaky
#12
Quote by Carlos Again
i just wait til i hear a guitar part in my head, and i put it onto the guitar, i also piece together random notes although it is a pretty lazy way to make music.


Personally, I think this is the best way to go about writing a song. The hardest, too. I can't start a song that way, but if I listen to a rhythm long enough, I start improvising in my head. That's when the good stuff comes out and I can express myself fully.
Quote by blackflag49
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#13
i normally get a riff idea in my head, or a melody, and then work it out. I then use that riff as a basis for the song. I have to make sure it flows properly. and other times I just come up with WTF? riffs and stuff, but they gotta flow a lil bit. I dont really pay attention to scales, but I dont randomly jump around the fretboard. and I try and focus on the "musical story" Its death and thrash type stuff but it still has a story. and then the lyrics get stuck to it later.
#14
I just randomly play a round on my guitar until something sounds good, which doesn't happen alot. My riffs are usually terrible, but if I come up with a chord progression, it turns out alright.
Skip the username, call me Billy
#15
Quote by dlguitarmaster7
i just kinda sit around and jam a bit. when i hear something i like, i play it over and over again and then build off of that
This.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#16
Quote by dlguitarmaster7
i just kinda sit around and jam a bit. when i hear something i like, i play it over and over again and then build off of that

This.
Quote by Tyler Durden
It's only after we've lost everything that we're free to do anything.

Erowid
#17
Quote by Carlos Again
i just wait til i hear a guitar part in my head, and i put it onto the guitar, i also piece together random notes although it is a pretty lazy way to make music.


I've always found this really difficult, as when I write lyrics I don't write a melody, so then I have nothing to base the chords on. I'll typically write chords or riffs or whatever to go behind the vocals, that I like, then I'll loop that and improvise sing over it, until I get a melody that I like, and then I add lyrics.

But to each his own. I wish I could write lyrics and then make them into a song.
#19
Sometimes I try to transpose things in my head. usually I kindof improv until I find something really. In fact most of the time I try to write a riff I give myself some guidelines to work with and improv around that (ie: power chords only, string bends, scales, tapping, palm muting). Lately I've been trying to write riffs only in major keys and it has lead me to experiment with DADGAD tuning a lot.
#20
I'll usually "stumble" upon a riff. From there on I try to squeeze out as many similar riffs from that as possible, and then try to surround it with similar riffs that "fit" into the original riff idea. For example, I tried to make up a Killswitch/Metalcore/Gothenburg riff type deal and I really like what I made up. So I threw together another riff that I had already had that fit with the other riff, and ended up with two solid riffs. From there I made a chorus, and had the general song structure down. I made two more really good riffs to finish it off and just changed around the song structure and what not.

Yeah, thats how a "riff" master does it lol. All metal guitarists just try to get as many different riffs from one idea as much as possible imo. I tend to use a lot of octaves when I write chorus too. The only other part of my writing is whether or not I want to harmonize certain riffs or leads, and whether or not I can fit a coherent solo into it or not. I'll usually record a riff and improv solo over it and i'll stumble upon something that works.

When I learn theory I will understand how it works lol.
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Dimebag Darrell Signature ML
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Peavey 5150 II
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#21
Scales are infinitely helpful. If you have interval listening training its even better. Just incorporate things typical to your style(if thats what you wanna do) but add your own thing to it. Thrash is basically either eighth notes, sixteenths with different ones blotted out with a few power chords. Just try some stuff.
#22
what ever sounds nice
Gear:
Dean Flying V
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#23
Right now, I'm more into just fitting chords into lyrics I've already written and getting the riffs and stuff by playing with the same feeling and tone as the rest of the song has ended up being.
#24
I just mess around. But I'm thinking very hard when I'm messing around. About rhythm, intervals, texture, movement, consonance, dissonance etc The more stuff I think about, the more cool stuff I usually get back out.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
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Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#25
Either, i simply sit down and make riffs, and make that into a song, adding other instruments or shizzle, or i do my typical "weird" approach, where i have some lyrics, and sit down, trying to make a guitar and bass-track that compliments the lyrics, instead of just sounding great.

That's my ways of doing it. Oh, and i almost never use any scales. I only use a second guitar for small lead-parts, that were never thought of according to any scale, just by feeling, y'know.
FUCK YOU ALL!

666 BLACK METAL HOLOCAUST!!!!!
#26
Quote by Northernmight
Either, i simply sit down and make riffs, and make that into a song, adding other instruments or shizzle, or i do my typical "weird" approach, where i have some lyrics, and sit down, trying to make a guitar and bass-track that compliments the lyrics, instead of just sounding great.

That's my ways of doing it. Oh, and i almost never use any scales. I only use a second guitar for small lead-parts, that were never thought of according to any scale, just by feeling, y'know.


Just about everything you probably right is in a scale of sometype. Unless you're playing truly atonal music. You probably just don't realize it.

Anyways, I usually play around for awhile and come up with riffs or progressions that will either lead to more, or lead to nothing and I keep them for a later date by putting them in GP or recording them. Alot of times I'll come up with a part that fits perfectly with a part I shelved awhile back.
#27
I write pretentious prog metal with too many instruments. I tab everything out in guitar pro as I write it, and only start to learn it when it's finished. I take ages to write a song, usually only writing one or two riffs a day, then adding in all the other instruments and listening to it over and over, to make sure nothing needs to be changed.

I never think about scales. I usually end up using a scale of some sort, but I never conciously decide "this song will be in C Mixolydian", I just imagine cool riffs or melodies in my head and tab them out as best I can.

I start with the intro, and always write everything in the order it's played in to make sure it all flows. The intro is usually soft, and from there I try and increase tension, add instruments, and let the song progress naturally until it sort of develops some kind of mood or character, and some kind of idea emerges that I could use as a recurring motif.

For example, in the song I'm currently writing, by the time I finished the intro I'd associated it with rain, Lovecraftian horror and a murky, dull blue colour, providing imagery to use in the lyrics. I sort of went into a waltz-like creepy carnival music section for a bit, so I've decided to have that waltz-like rhythm recurr subtly throughout the song, and have variations on the melody from that section all over the place - I've just used that melody transposed into a major key with a few notes added as a post-chorus riff - and then, in the outro, have that whole creepy carnival waltz section from the intro come back, all the build-up and stuff hopefully making it epic as shit.

There's also a diminished 7th chord I'm using all over the place which I haven't used before, and most of the chord progressions - the song being in C minor - are ending with a G minor followed by a G major. I'm intending to use those ideas in a lot of riffs and progressions to make them defining characteristics of the song. I couldn't think of a less pretentious way to put it.

I also tend to steal ideas from other songs if, as I listen to what I've done so far, they remind me of it. For example, having just written the chorus and realising it sounded too short, it reminded me of how the first chorus of Seed Awakening by Nevermore was broken into two parts, with a quiet section in between. So I stole that idea.

And for song structures, I tend to use more complicated variations on the verse-chorus-verse structure. This time I'm using a giant verse-prechorus-chorus-postchorus-bridge-etc cycle, which will be repeated twice before an outro which repeats parts of the intro. Bringing back a riff from the intro in the outro is always good.

I hope that gives you some ideas. It was fun writing it out, anyway.
I'LL PUNCH A DONKEY IN THE STREETS OF GALWAY
Last edited by whalepudding at Dec 15, 2009,
#28
Quote by dlguitarmaster7
i just kinda sit around and jam a bit. when i hear something i like, i play it over and over again and then build off of that



This, I just screw around with random things till I find something that fits. But recently I've been writeing full drum tracks, then improvising guitar over those. It's a horrible method of writeing songs, especially since I never write any of it down, which I should, cause I know what I'm playing, its just that over the weeks of constantly writeing songs you kinda forget small details of other songs.

I'm a horrible muscian But I do write alot of songs.
#30
Quote by Myshadow46_2
Usually I'll be listening to some music and I'll hear a part that inspires me. Then I'll try and copy it without actually transcribing it. I'll make a few changes and there we have it, a new riff.
I do something kinda similar - if I hear something that inspires me I'll try and come up with an answering phrase to it, rather than trying to repeat it.

If I'm actually trying to write a song I tend to rely on theory to make up for my lack of creativity lol. I'll come up with a chord progression, then maybe play around with it to make it more interesting, then come up with other parts based off the scale/chords I've used. Solos I generally noodle over the rhythm part for that section until something starts to gel.
#31
I usually just improv with my guitarist till I come up with a nice sounding riff. If im alone I just listen to a bunch of riffs to get inspired (no I dont steal)
#32
I write songs in a weird way. I see the guitar like I would see a piano, and so I try not to limit myself to the usual cliches of music. Everything is free and open to interpretation. Most of my songs are written off of unusual chords I've found that I really like. I don't care too much for guitar solos. If there's going to be a guitar solo in my music (or really, much riffage at all), then its sole purpose is going to be to enhance the mood already set by the song.

I don't really like the phrase "writing songs" because I don't think that's quite what I do. I let the songs write themselves, but guide them along to the finished product.

Of course, at the same time, the exact method I use to write songs changes from album to album. My tastes are always changing and evolving, and so I draw inspiration from different sources and people. So I suppose that I'm really directing the album into one coherent effort rather than sticking a bunch of random songs on a CD and calling it an album.

WHAT HAVE YOU DONE
#33
I usually write lyrics at some point, then a melody (with slide guitar) later, than fit chords and lead licks to it. Some times I do riffs first, then chords, then melody and fit old lyrics to it.
the problem is whenever I get a stroke of poetic genious (lyric wise), I seldom write it all down... so ive got like 20 half finished songs and like three finished ones. The odd time i will improv the lyrics and melody over a progression and it will sound sweet. (then I dont write it down!)

In my band I play bass though, so I sit back and wait till guitar and drums are worked out, then use scales/key of guitar and the rythym of the drums to write my bit.
GUITARS
Burswood Acoustic
Squier Affinity Strat
Fender Tele Deluxe
BASS
Ibanez Jetking bass
AMPS
Marshall MG30DFX
Peavey max 158 bass amp
Fender Bassman 250
1979 Carvin of some sort
And some pedals
#34
I hear it in my head - I figure there's a subconscious reason it wants to be there and have meaning - from there I try my best to work out what it was. Sometimes I succeed sometimes it just sits on the back burner. Im fairly critical of my songs that I release, and if Im not 90% happy with them or where they are going they wont see the light of day till I am.
#35
Quote by whalepudding
I write pretentious prog metal with too many instruments. I tab everything out in guitar pro as I write it, and only start to learn it when it's finished. I take ages to write a song, usually only writing one or two riffs a day, then adding in all the other instruments and listening to it over and over, to make sure nothing needs to be changed.

I never think about scales. I usually end up using a scale of some sort, but I never conciously decide "this song will be in C Mixolydian", I just imagine cool riffs or melodies in my head and tab them out as best I can.

I start with the intro, and always write everything in the order it's played in to make sure it all flows. The intro is usually soft, and from there I try and increase tension, add instruments, and let the song progress naturally until it sort of develops some kind of mood or character, and some kind of idea emerges that I could use as a recurring motif.

For example, in the song I'm currently writing, by the time I finished the intro I'd associated it with rain, Lovecraftian horror and a murky, dull blue colour, providing imagery to use in the lyrics. I sort of went into a waltz-like creepy carnival music section for a bit, so I've decided to have that waltz-like rhythm recurr subtly throughout the song, and have variations on the melody from that section all over the place - I've just used that melody transposed into a major key with a few notes added as a post-chorus riff - and then, in the outro, have that whole creepy carnival waltz section from the intro come back, all the build-up and stuff hopefully making it epic as shit.

There's also a diminished 7th chord I'm using all over the place which I haven't used before, and most of the chord progressions - the song being in C minor - are ending with a G minor followed by a G major. I'm intending to use those ideas in a lot of riffs and progressions to make them defining characteristics of the song. I couldn't think of a less pretentious way to put it.

I also tend to steal ideas from other songs if, as I listen to what I've done so far, they remind me of it. For example, having just written the chorus and realising it sounded too short, it reminded me of how the first chorus of Seed Awakening by Nevermore was broken into two parts, with a quiet section in between. So I stole that idea.

And for song structures, I tend to use more complicated variations on the verse-chorus-verse structure. This time I'm using a giant verse-prechorus-chorus-postchorus-bridge-etc cycle, which will be repeated twice before an outro which repeats parts of the intro. Bringing back a riff from the intro in the outro is always good.

I hope that gives you some ideas. It was fun writing it out, anyway.



man, I'd love to hear that. could I have a listen at what you've got? or could you send me a pm when it's done?


anyways, on topic:

I normally get my ideas while fooling around in a key, or else playing around chromatically. when I come across something I like, I'll keep playing it for a while, altering it until it's as best as I can get it. then I build on this idea. sometimes it'll end up being an intro, sometimes the verse, really anything. it could end up just being one little section that only gets played once. but it's what sets off the spark.

from there I decide what that part would be best suited for and I start writing other parts that may fit, or even parts that aren't very similar that I can lead into later. Then the rest of it just sorta seems to fall into place. I tend to write in bursts, like I'll write a little of it, then come back to it after a while and write more, etc.