#1
Can you get a major feel out of this chord? If you play it with other minor chords it should sound minor, but if you throw it in a major progression using it as a relative minor or something (placing it next to some happier chords) can you get a happy feel out of it?

would you have to put it next to an even more minor sounding chord just to make it sound a little brighter?

what are my options?
#2
If you didn't play the third in the melody on top of it or if the chord voicing didn't accentuate the third much I guess it would sound a little happier.

If you're worried about it just leave the third out of the soloing, hell leave the third out of the chord!
#3
Usually chords with a minor quality sound minor and chord with a major quality sound major. I dunno, it's always made sense to me.

Anyway, it sounds dark because it's an unstable chord. If you wanted it to be more stable and therefore lighter, I guess you could voice it so that the major seventh (the unstable note) of the chord is only used once and the other notes are used a lot more and are used in the lower notes and the higher notes of the voicing. But it'd just sound similar to a minor chord and not a major chord...

So why are you so bent on using this chord anyway?
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#4
Quote by demonofthenight
Usually chords with a minor quality sound minor and chord with a major quality sound major. I dunno, it's always made sense to me.

Anyway, it sounds dark because it's an unstable chord. If you wanted it to be more stable and therefore lighter, I guess you could voice it so that the major seventh (the unstable note) of the chord is only used once and the other notes are used a lot more and are used in the lower notes and the higher notes of the voicing. But it'd just sound similar to a minor chord and not a major chord...

So why are you so bent on using this chord anyway?

Maybe he is trying to learn how to through writing something.
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Erowid
#5
the thing to remember is the Min MAj7 chord has A Major7th interval,
this is the interval used for the shower scene in hitchcock's "psycho ."

its not a "pleasant " sound its very dissonant .
when you say MAJOR sounding i assume you mean a Major chord , or major scale .
Well the major chord has just the R,3,5 of the scale they are very harmonious notes ,
Maybe when you say "major" that is what your are trying to say ,
have you noticed how had it is to get a good solo out the major scale ?
if you have its because its a harmonic minefield , there are 2 very ugly , dissonant intervals
the 4th and the 7th .
so the terms MAJOR 7th or Minor Major7th chord can both be missleading .

you could compare the Min Maj7th
1,b3,5,7

with the dominant 7th
1,3,5,b7

which sounds more Major ?
#6
The m/Maj7 chord has an Augmented triad in it, the M7, m3, and 5 stacked on each other.

Augmented triads are nothing more than a Major triad with a raised 5th, creating R M3 and #5. So that is definitely a big reference to a Major sound.

Here's a few things about the m/M7 and the Aug chord...

1. The m/M7 chord is usually found as a passing chord from a straight Minor traid to a m7 chord...hence the common (using D as a reference)...Dm-Dm/M7-Dm7-Dm6 progression found in Summertime, Masquerade, adn many other tunes.

If you want to extend the chord, use m9/M7 or m/M9 if you will, this is "The James Bond chord"...

E--14--
B--12--
G--12--
D--13--
A--x--
E--0--

2. Since the m/M7 has an Augmented triad in it, and the Augmented Triad is symmetrical made up of all M3 interval, you can play it's inversions by moving it up and Major 3rd intervals (or 4 frets higher or 4 frets lower).

So for Am/M7 you can play G#aug, Caug, and Eaug. Moving those around might get a more Augmented, or Major, sound going...but in reality you'll probably only get to use it in a Minor base tune

But moving that Augmented chord into it's inversions is definitely a Major sound.
Last edited by MikeDodge at Dec 14, 2009,