#1
Okay so i recently decided to change to classical sitting position with my electric guitar, meaning the guitar is now on my left leg. The question is, how high does my left leg need to be because i have read that people stack books to put their left foot on while playing?
#3
idk why youd want to do it with an electric, its really best for finger picking with a classical acoustic thats strings are farther apart. but yea basically any height you like (usually like 6 inches to a foot). they make adjustable foot stools you can buy for it. or my old teacher used a pad you can get that sits on your thigh and elevates it that way instead.
#4
Classical sitting position is great for practicing electric guitar. Standing is still the test of whether you can really play something well, but sitting is the best way to learn something. Cuts down on other physical distractions.
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#5
Classical sitting position is great for practicing electric guitar. Standing is still the test of whether you can really play something well, but sitting is the best way to learn something. Cuts down on other physical distractions.


yea its good to practice while sitting, but whats the point in playing whats probably rock with a pick on an electric on your left leg?
#6
Quote by spacedoutbad
yea its good to practice while sitting, but whats the point in playing whats probably rock with a pick on an electric on your left leg?

You clearly don't know what you're talking about. If you don't use a pick, what do you play with? Hopes and dreams? A pick is the most common way to play guitar. Period. The only person I can think of right now who plays rock with finger style is Joey Eppard. Picking FTW. And as to why rest the guitar on your left leg, watch Freepower's vid on posture
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#7
^ I'm guessing he means that you won't normally perform rock music like that. And he's right!

But it's easier to get good hand position like this and if you'll be doing lots of practice then it makes it easier on your tendons to do it in classical position.

When you rock wear your guitar at a sensible height and don't baseball bat it.
#8
You clearly don't know what you're talking about. If you don't use a pick, what do you play with? Hopes and dreams? A pick is the most common way to play guitar. Period. The only person I can think of right now who plays rock with finger style is Joey Eppard. Picking FTW. And as to why rest the guitar on your left leg, watch Freepower's vid on posture


youd use your ****ing fingers? clearly you dont know what youre talking about. yea a pick is most common and yea everyone uses it for rock but the whole point is that you dont play rock on your left leg. you play classical on your left leg, with an acoustic, with your fingers. playing rock on your left leg is pointless and not really going to give you a benefit over just playing on your right.
#9
Um, the reason i asked was because quite a number of metal guitarists use this position. E.g. Rusty Cooley. I also read that it allowed you easier access to the upper frets. So, yeah.
#10
Quote by spacedoutbad
youd use your ****ing fingers? clearly you dont know what youre talking about. yea a pick is most common and yea everyone uses it for rock but the whole point is that you dont play rock on your left leg. you play classical on your left leg, with an acoustic, with your fingers. playing rock on your left leg is pointless and not really going to give you a benefit over just playing on your right.

I never said I'd use fingers. I just misread your post. Sorry dude . Anyway, a lot of metal guitarists actually incorporate the classical position into their practicing and playing because it makes it easier to play difficult passages on the higher frets. Take a look at John Petrucci. Whenever he plays a solo he always rests his guitar on his left leg.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#11
playing rock on your left leg is pointless and not really going to give you a benefit over just playing on your right.


.... or the classical guitarists have already figured out that it makes fret access and wrist position a lot easier.