#1
One thing that I never understood what how to figure out what chord goes with a certain key or vice versa. I know that you can play them and figure out what seems and sounds just "right" but isn't there a better way to do this? Can anyone point me in the right direction? BTW how many scales are good to learn? Have you guys learned all the positions for a certain scale?
#2
Quote by LedZepFan2000
One thing that I never understood what how to figure out what chord goes with a certain key or vice versa. I know that you can play them and figure out what seems and sounds just "right" but isn't there a better way to do this? Can anyone point me in the right direction? BTW how many scales are good to learn? Have you guys learned all the positions for a certain scale?


That's up to you to be quite honest. Scales are good 'n all, but if you aren't going to use them in some way (whether it be for writing songs, or improvising to a track in your bedroom) there's no point to learning all scales there are to know.
But you should at least know the pentatonic minor/major, the major scale, and the natural minor scale, as those are common.
I know quite a few positions for all the scales that I know, and some scales that I know, I know all the positions for.

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#3
Best scales to start learning are the Major, Minor, Pentatonics (Maj & Min) and blues for now.

Just google them. Basically, you pick a key (which is a set of notes, like C Major is C D E F G A B C) and you can play any note (or chord) in that scale as long as the root note is what the note is in the scale.
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#4
I don't learn positions. I just know the notes and some of the octaves.

You should know the notes of a scale and how to construct them before you worry about shapes.

To figure out chords you can look at the notes of the scale and you will notice what kinds of chords you can make.

Some basic ones would be:

In the C Major Scale
Cmaj (CEG) Dmin (DFA) Emin (EGB) Fmaj (FAC) Gmaj (GBD) Amin (ACE) Bdim (BDF)

That goes for all major scales.

I ii iii IV V vi viio

After that you can go along and make sus chords (omit the 3rd and add the 2nd or 4th) like CDG (sus2) and CFG (sus4).

There is a whole bunch. Read the Music Theory FAQ and if you have any more questions I or someone else can try to help.

P.S. That is for diatonic chord progressions.
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Last edited by RockGuitar92 at Dec 14, 2009,
#6
RockGuitar92, that probably fried his brain. That's pretty far gone theory.

Basically, you have a group of notes (collectively called a "key"). If you pick for example, F Sharp Major, you have F Sharp, G Sharp, A Sharp, B, C Sharp, D Sharp and F. If you were to pick a chord progression to play, it will be in the key of F Sharp as long as you pick a chord that has the root of one of the notes in that key. I have no idea what it sounds like, but you could play F Sharp, A Sharp and C Sharp as your progression, and that progression would be in the key of F Sharp Major.
Posted from Ubuntu.

Squier Precision Bass Special in Antique Burst (LH)
Rotosound Swing 66s, 45-105

On slapping on a bass:
Quote by supersac
pretend its a woman
i have no helpful advice

#7
The chords that go in a key have no accidentals. In Major scale, I, IV, and V are major, ii, iii, and vi are minor, and viio is diminished. In a natural minor scale III, VI, and VII are major, i, iv, and v are minor, and iio is diminished. If you don't know what major, minor, and diminished mean, JFGI.
#8
Quote by druggietoad2k5
RockGuitar92, that probably fried his brain. That's pretty far gone theory.

Basically, you have a group of notes (collectively called a "key"). If you pick for example, F Sharp Major, you have F Sharp, G Sharp, A Sharp, B, C Sharp, D Sharp and F. If you were to pick a chord progression to play, it will be in the key of F Sharp as long as you pick a chord that has the root of one of the notes in that key. I have no idea what it sounds like, but you could play F Sharp, A Sharp and C Sharp as your progression, and that progression would be in the key of F Sharp Major.

I don't know how laying it out with examples "fried his brain."

I didn't over complicate it. I just wrote it out so he can see the notes in each of those chords and to show that they are pitches from within the scale that make the progression in key.
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#9
Quote by LedZepFan2000
So the notes in the scale also show up in the chord that is in that key?

Yup, all the chords of a given key will only contain the notes of that scale.
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#10
Quote by LedZepFan2000
One thing that I never understood what how to figure out what chord goes with a certain key or vice versa. I know that you can play them and figure out what seems and sounds just "right" but isn't there a better way to do this? Can anyone point me in the right direction? BTW how many scales are good to learn? Have you guys learned all the positions for a certain scale?
Learn the major scale so you understand how its constructed in terms of steps (WWHWWWH), notes (eg G Maj = G A B C D E F#) and intervals (root, maj 2nd, maj 3rd, perfect 4th etc) then learn how to harmonise the scale by stacking 3rds - that'll teach you the basics of chord construction and how to work out the chords for any scale. And set you up for understanding other scales and modes