#1
I have in my possession a Mel Bay beginner's book for classical guitar. In the "studies" it tells you above the music which fingers you should use (p,i,m,a, of course).

The problem is, in a few of the "studies" it shows to use 2 different fingers to play the 2 quarter notes in a row of the same note. For instance, say there are two high, open E string, quarter notes. It would say to use fingers M and A to play it.

In a few of the other studies, it will say to use the same finger twice to play the notes (the finger of the respective string that the note is played on)

The question: How do you know when to use two different fingers or to use the same finger in a row? I think it's easier to use the respective finger than to move a finger from another string to play the notes alternating.

I don't know if it's something to do with how classical guitar is played or if it's just something to do with the fact that it's a beginner book and it wants to hold your hand through it.
#2
classical guitar generally focuses a lot on "playing in position" in other words each finger lines up with a single fret in order (index=1, middle=2, ring=3, pinky=4) so you use those fingers to play each note. that being said don't focus too much on what finger you should play with, play with whatever finger feels natural on that fret. there is no wrong or right way, just make the notes come out well and don't put too much faith in your book.
[edit] in retrospect i imagine it's just a typo in your book. there's no reason to use two different fingers to play the same note.[/edit]
Last edited by Against Him? at Dec 14, 2009,
#3
Quote by Against Him?
classical guitar generally focuses a lot on "playing in position" in other words each finger lines up with a single fret in order (index=1, middle=2, ring=3, pinky=4) so you use those fingers to play each note. that being said don't focus too much on what finger you should play with, play with whatever finger feels natural on that fret. there is no wrong or right way, just make the notes come out well and don't put too much faith in your book.
So, the fretting position of fingers matters more than the fingers that pluck the strings (except technique like free stroke, rest, etc. I assume)?


Edit: *sees edit* Ah, okay. Cool. It's easier for me to leave the g string notes to my I finger and b string notes to my M finger, etc. That is, unless there is a fast run and then I alternate between I and M fingers.
Last edited by metal4all at Dec 14, 2009,
#4
It's been a long time since I took classical guitar lessons (cough 35 years cough) but I don't remember the Mel Bay book as being one of the better ones for learning classical guitar.

The fingering for both hands is very important. With the right hand, you are concerned with which finger, whether it is rest or free stroke, and also the dynamics of the music. The choice of finger may be partially affected by which note you are accenting.

There is also sort of a tension in classical guitar between doing it the "right" way, and doing it in a way that feels best to you. I suggest you first learn the suggested "right" way before you make your own decisions on the best fingering for a piece. The fingerings suggested by some books are better than others. I remember some that were downright worthless with regard to the suggested fingerings.