#1
This is not for those who have a strong level of theory and understanding. This is a survey of those of you who come here asking about theory, looking at the lessons and still confused.

Or those of you who come here looking for answers, but want no part of theory? If so, why?

What about the quality of the answers that you receive when you do ask questions? Do people talk over your heads, and if so, does that intimidate or make you not want to get into theory "that much"?

If you don't know the notes on the neck, can you share why you don't know them, and do you want to?

Does theory confuse you?

Does theory seem important?

What would it take for you to be more into theory, to learn the notes and to get deeper into the understanding of the guitar?

Thanks for your answers in advance.
#2
Yes, yes, and yes. lol I dont know a whole lot of theory at all, and when I do have a question I either search it or ask on here. Sometimes I get good answers, and other times it turns into full fledged arguements between people disagreeing over what makes this progression the Key of C# or how a chord is formed. Its really annoying.

But also, it should be mentioned that its easier for me to be shown in person and taught step by step than it is to read about it all and not have anyone correcting me.

To answer the Q's..
-I am into theory and interested in learning.
-Already answered the second one.
-I know the notes on the neck
-Yes theory confuses me. Especially when UGers just argue about it.
-Yes I think theory seems very important.
-It would prolly take an actualy teacher, or at least a solid book/video.
#3
I just recently got into theory but I actually find it really interesting. It makes things way more complicated, like someone who doesn't particularly have a interest in theory just excepts whatever to be true but if you do have interest, once you 'get it' it makes everything seem less intimidating. The thing is, to really 'get it', it takes a lot of time.

Does theory confuse me? Of course. To really understand theory completly (if that's possible) you need to spend lots of time studying up on it. In fact, most of the time (atleast in my experience) is not figuring out what works out, it's figuring out why everything works out the way it does.
#4
Theory is easiest to understand when you don't view it from a guitar perspective. Then you don't get confused with "but what if i use this box shape next to that and...".

I love studying theory, i find it interesting and it does wonders for your compositional skills.

It's important to learn only in certain situations. Ifd you want to compose concertos and symphonies for orchestras and write music for films then obviously you're going to have to know your stuff. If you just enjoy getting the guitar out everynow and again and jamming over a 12 bar then you don't really need it bar the basics.
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Dec 14, 2009,
#5
I'll answer the questions that apply to me

What about the quality of the answers that you receive when you do ask questions? Do people talk over your heads, and if so, does that intimidate or make you not want to get into theory "that much"?

I generally try to do a bit of research on my questions before I pose them here, so usually there will be a straight forward answer with not many arguable elements. Although, I do find that a lot of UGers do talk over some people's heads and don't seem to remember how hard some things are to grasp, or that there is a lot of background information you need to know in order to 'get it'

I myself love theory and am a very eager learner/discusser of it.

If you don't know the notes on the neck, can you share why you don't know them, and do you want to?


I have to admit that in certain positions I do take a second to figure out what note I'm playing but I have been working very hard on this and I can see the improvement. By the end of Jan I should be able to solo without shapes and confidently all over the neck.

Also, I don't think this should be treated as part of the whole daunting theory, but something you just plain need to know to play guitar.

Does theory confuse you?

Of course! Theory is very confusing. Even for someone like me who has been learning about it for 10 years. I find new things or I go back to old things that I didn't properly mash into my head, and they are confusing!

Does theory seem important?


It does to me. Theory is involved in a big part of my playing. It makes everything a lot quicker and easier.

What would it take for you to be more into theory, to learn the notes and to get deeper into the understanding of the guitar?


Not alot. I guess my teachers area the people who really inspired me and taught me the most. But, revision is a must on all new theory and a way to relate it back to your own guitar playing is extremely important. All in all music is an aural form. Everything is about sound, not what you write down, but what you play. That is why theory always needs to be related to your instrument so you can hear how it sounds.
Last edited by mdwallin at Dec 14, 2009,
#6
Quote by Sean0913
This is not for those who have a strong level of theory and understanding. This is a survey of those of you who come here asking about theory, looking at the lessons and still confused.

Or those of you who come here looking for answers, but want no part of theory? If so, why?
I originally came here just for answers - well clarification really, to save hassling my teacher too much in the week. I started lurking in MT within a couple of months of starting playing and its helped a lot. Now I spend more time attempting to answer questions than asking them, but I still learn as much here
Quote by Sean0913
What about the quality of the answers that you receive when you do ask questions? Do people talk over your heads, and if so, does that intimidate or make you not want to get into theory "that much"?
I've normally come for clarification on points that I know a decent amount about, but can't quite get my head around the finer details of, so generally I've been able to phrase my questions so the answers have been pretty concise and really useful.

There are certain topics that nearly always start a huge discussion, and I'd guess it must be pretty confusing to newbies to the forum to work out who to listen to - although if you've read the stickies you probably know enough to work out who knows what they are talking about
Quote by Sean0913
If you don't know the notes on the neck, can you share why you don't know them, and do you want to?
I dont know every inch of the neck well enough to point to a note instantaneously, but I know it well enough to find any note in a couple of seconds, and well enough for my current playing abilities, and its getting more natural all the time.
Quote by Sean0913
Does theory confuse you?
Yup, regularly. Mainly when I'm trying to understand something without really understanding the concepts its built on. I don't think I'd be half as interested in learning it if it was easy though lol
Quote by Sean0913
Does theory seem important?
Yes, but then I'm an engineer - I like to know how things work. And I don't see the point in reinventing the wheel when I can draw on the experiences of hundreds of years of musicians before me
Quote by Sean0913
What would it take for you to be more into theory, to learn the notes and to get deeper into the understanding of the guitar?
I've got a really good teacher who motivates me to learn, plus the more I learn the more I find I can do with my instrument - I'm not sure it would be healthy for me to get more into theory at the moment lol
#7
I have never learned much about theory, mostly because I never got a chance to, but yes, it confuses me and I don't feel like it will help my playing as much as it should. Frankly, I don't see how it will make me any more creative, and how it will help me while playing. Sure, I'd rather have structure, but when I play, I'm always stuck in a rut, and I don't see how learning the notes and stuff can give me any inspiration on writing.

I don't think I'd really be confused if I took the time to memorize things, but it does intimidate me because I'm not exactly a patient guy. So yeah...
#8
I'll give it a shot. I know basic theory, and know the notes by location and such, and yes a broader level of theory does kind of intimidate me, since it seems to distant to me, as if it was a foreign language.

For me to learn more theory, it would just take myself to get working, and someone to explain it to me in a good manner, as if i was a complete retard. I am kind of a slow learner.

Though i know the basics of scales and such, the only scales i know are the pentatonic scale and the major scale - i just haven't been taking my time to learn more, honestly, so any lack of theory is my own fault. Though i think i'll be looking into the minor scale soon.

It also has alot to do with me not really being interrested in learning much more about the guitar as it is, right now, and for the fast couple of years. I am much more focused on writing with the skills i already got, and make the results good, since, to me, great music can be made easily. Well.. maybe not EASILY, but you can make great music and riffs, even if you've only played for a year aswell. Shitload of theory and wankery-skills is merely a bonus, and i doubt i'd be implementing much of it into my songwriting, since none of my songs really call for technical wankery.

THOUGH, i have been thinking about making a fun-project. Being a power-metal band in the vein of Manowar, just to play some great heavy and have a great time. There it would come in handy (The obligatory solo's, haha).
FUCK YOU ALL!

666 BLACK METAL HOLOCAUST!!!!!
Last edited by Northernmight at Dec 15, 2009,
#9
Quote by Sean0913
This is not for those who have a strong level of theory and understanding. This is a survey of those of you who come here asking about theory, looking at the lessons and still confused.

What about the quality of the answers that you receive when you do ask questions? Do people talk over your heads, and if so, does that intimidate or make you not want to get into theory "that much"?


Sometimes it can seem intimidating, like you're the only person that doesn't understand the conversation and that by not knowing you're somehow inferior to those that do (though I don't believe this is intentional). As far as learning theory goes, hearing others talk about it only makes me want to learn it more; both for the sake of clarity and to give my ego a needed boost.

If you don't know the notes on the neck, can you share why you don't know them, and do you want to?


I tried learning every single note across all 6 strings across all 22 available frets. I picked up a little but I made things a lot harder than they needed to be. Once I learnt about octaves, fifths and fourths, everything meshed together a lot better; I am now able to name any note quickly and can even name those around it, it has been a big help in terms of composition and improvising.

Does theory confuse you?


Yes, it has done so in the past and continues to now, but that is part of the joy in learning theory - for all that I know, there is much more that I don't - it can be learnt and utilized so it is not bad to not know something.
The confusion only exists if you do not ask questions, why does this do this? Why does this change when I do that? These are the kind of things that I find myself asking, and simply hearing "because that's how it works" is not good enough, I will not learn anything and the subject will remain ambiguous.

Does theory seem important?


It's important to me, yes. I know plenty of guitarists who know nothing of theory and they're happy doing their own thing, I personally feel that I am better for knowing even just a bit of theory.

What would it take for you to be more into theory, to learn the notes and to get deeper into the understanding of the guitar?


More time in the day.

Thanks for your answers in advance.


You're welcome
#10
Here ya go

Quote by Sean0913
This is not for those who have a strong level of theory and understanding. This is a survey of those of you who come here asking about theory, looking at the lessons and still confused.

Or those of you who come here looking for answers, but want no part of theory? If so, why? I learn as I go, thats the reason, I don't sit down and learn everything I can. I play, and when I have issues, I'll ask on here, and usually some sort of theory or principle can be applied, and I'll study up on it.

What about the quality of the answers that you receive when you do ask questions? Do people talk over your heads, and if so, does that intimidate or make you not want to get into theory "that much"?
Theres a few people on here that understand how to teach something, but most of the time it seems there are people who just talk and don't simplify it down to help learn it, and make theory seem super hard, and complicated.

If you don't know the notes on the neck, can you share why you don't know them, and do you want to? I know them

Does theory confuse you? A couple of years ago, yes it did, but now that I'm older, its coming a lot easier for some reason. And things that I was just like "wtf" to now make perfect sense.

Does theory seem important? Yea, do I apply it enough...no lol

What would it take for you to be more into theory, to learn the notes and to get deeper into the understanding of the guitar? Simplified versions of everything. Which is one reason when I'm stuck on something or need help I ask, and I'll learn a little, just so I don't take it ALL in at once and get confused.

Thanks for your answers in advance.
#11
What about the quality of the answers that you receive when you do ask questions? Do people talk over your heads, and if so, does that intimidate or make you not want to get into theory "that much"?

I don't ask questions, but I lurk threads where interesting questions are asked, and I understand most answers.

If you don't know the notes on the neck, can you share why you don't know them, and do you want to?

I don't know them, but I really really want to. I don't know them because I don't take the time to learn them.

Does theory confuse you?

Not one bit, when I try to learn something, it does't dazzle me as much as for example electronics do.

Does theory seem important?

It helps us understand the music that great musicians wrote, therefore it helps us create stuff like that, so it is important.
What would it take for you to be more into theory, to learn the notes and to get deeper into the understanding of the guitar?

I love theory, but I'm lazy as ****, so I don't know as much as I'd like to. And money probably would get me more into learning about it.