#1
'Sup everyone,
I'm starting a superstrat project. I've disassembled an old, no-brander strat copy. It wasn't too good, but the body is in good shape and the neck is pretty nice. I'm going for a white, So-Cal style result: http://www.richtonemusic.co.uk/bmz_cache/e/eeb67c2d7745d6190b93fd201065260c.image.300x300.jpg
Now, here are the questions:

Will mounting a Floyd Rose tremolo be difficult? The guitar's got stantard, Fender-style tremolo knockoff. I understand that I'll have to take another piece off the body to allow the tremolo to move both ways. Is this something I can do at home if I first find good instructions and follow them?

Also, will the new type of tremolo mess up the guitar's scale and / or bring about any other problems I haven't foreseen?

How about the finish, then? It's black at the moment, and looks like someone just sprayed it with some cheap-ass black spray. I know I'll have to strip the body of the paint, but will it be difficult to repaint it myself? Is it something I should leave to a professional, and if so, will he charge me much for this kind of operation? I understand that the price varies, but are we talking about $50 or $250?
Gear:

Guitars: Ibanez SV5470F, Ibanez Xpt700, Fender MIM Standard Stratocaster ('04-'05), Jackson Ps-2
Ashton AG200,
Amps: ENGL E530, Bugera 6262-212,
FX: TC Electronics G-major 2, Behringer EQ700, Morley Volume / Wah
#2
For the floyd, you'd need to rout a cavity for the system to fit into. This could be easy or hard depending on your skill and experience with woodwork, and the tools you have. Best to practice on something else until you feel confident enough, and even so, measure twice and cut once.

If installed properly, it wouldn't mess up the scale, but you'd need a locking nut as well.

As long as you prime it properly, painting and finishing in a solid colour should be simple The price of getting someone else to do it for you won't be cheap, i imagine.

Good luck!
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#3
Quote by Ratfish
For the floyd, you'd need to rout a cavity for the system to fit into. This could be easy or hard depending on your skill and experience with woodwork, and the tools you have. Best to practice on something else until you feel confident enough, and even so, measure twice and cut once.

If installed properly, it wouldn't mess up the scale, but you'd need a locking nut as well.

As long as you prime it properly, painting and finishing in a solid colour should be simple The price of getting someone else to do it for you won't be cheap, i imagine.

Good luck!

Ok, thanks for the info, it'll take some cash, and since time = money, it won't be done right away... but I'll be posting pics of the project as I get something done! <:
Gear:

Guitars: Ibanez SV5470F, Ibanez Xpt700, Fender MIM Standard Stratocaster ('04-'05), Jackson Ps-2
Ashton AG200,
Amps: ENGL E530, Bugera 6262-212,
FX: TC Electronics G-major 2, Behringer EQ700, Morley Volume / Wah
#4
Hey man, I've been there and completely tore a strat to shit and modded the hell out of it... much like your doing...
One thing I'll have to say, is that trying to install a Floyd Rose, or Kahler (very commonly used on strat bodies) vibrato is going to be quite a procedure. Mainly because the cavity type required by a locking tremolo system is drastically different from that of your standard strat setup ... You will have to have a pretty solid knowledge of woodworking and all the required tools to basically fill in that hole and cut out a new one specifically for the style of bridge you are planning on using.... Honestly I'd say if a locking vibrato is a must have, get either a solid body and start from that, or get a hold of a body that already is built for that bridge setup...

As far as a paintjob is required, yours should be quite simple and can be achieved beautifully with aerosol cans.

Basically take the paint all the way down to the sealer (if it has a sealed layer, basically a thick transparent coating on the wood), if there is no layer I recommend sealing the wood. Basically from there you need to apply a nice primer coat to the body, after each layer sand the primer down and repeat until there are no blemishes in the paint. Once you have that solid foundation pick your poison (I don't recommend going cheap). Start painting thin "cloudy" layers and letting them dry between coats (crucial... cuz if not after all your coats the paint job will be very soft as the semi-dry paint is trapped in). Once you get a solid thickness and even coat, either dry sand (if many blemishes) and/or wet sand till the paint is smooth. After the paint is how you want it and its all cured you'll want to add your clear coat "lacquer" make it shine and shimmer going about like you did with the colored paint.. once wet sanded it will still seem dull dont worry, just make sure it is smooth. After that take some Auto polishing compound and a soft rag and go to town on that bad boy for a while, watch it buff out beautifully.
#5
Are you me? I'm doing exactly the same thing to my old strat copy! I was even inspired by the Charvel too! Only difference is I'm scalloping the whole fretboard, just because I can.
The Floyd shouldn't cause you too much hassle if you're going to flat mount it like the Charvels are, you'll just need to drill holes for the studs, and probably cut the pickguard too so the Floyd can fit. You might also need to add a little angle to the neck. If you want to be able to pull up on the trem, you'll need to rout a cavity for it, and theres a good guide to doing this on projectguitar.com
#6
Quote by littlephil
Are you me? I'm doing exactly the same thing to my old strat copy! I was even inspired by the Charvel too! Only difference is I'm scalloping the whole fretboard, just because I can.
The Floyd shouldn't cause you too much hassle if you're going to flat mount it like the Charvels are, you'll just need to drill holes for the studs, and probably cut the pickguard too so the Floyd can fit. You might also need to add a little angle to the neck. If you want to be able to pull up on the trem, you'll need to rout a cavity for it, and theres a good guide to doing this on projectguitar.com



can you link me to that guide? im really in need of it!
#7
Quote by superstang01
can you link me to that guide? im really in need of it!

Seems I was thinking of the normal trem cavity to JEM Lions Claw. There isnt one on how to do a normal cavity, but its not that hard. Get some templates (there should be heaps on ebay) and a template cutting bit for your router, then you just need to drill a little bit out first, put the router in and slowly work your way towards the edges of the template.