#1
Hi there!
I am currently writing a task about the four seasons 1st movement Spring by Antonio Vivaldi.
I was just wondering about the key changes, i believe that the song is in the key of E major, but around 1:30 and 2 min the key changes to a minor, but which and what time approx. does it modulate?

One day you`re gonna wake up and you`ll be 30 years old and you won`t have done a damn thing with your life.
#2
Yes, it's in E major. Around 1:30 (obviously this depends whose interpretation you're listening to) there's a chromatic progression, closely resembling a circle of fiths progression that takes you into C#minor.
Last edited by National_Anthem at Dec 16, 2009,
#3
Quote by National_Anthem
Yes, it's in E major. Around 1:30 (obviously this depends whose interpretation you're listening to) there's a chromatic progression, closely resembling a circle of fiths progression that takes you into C#minor.

Could you give me a little bit more information about this chromatic progression? thanks!

One day you`re gonna wake up and you`ll be 30 years old and you won`t have done a damn thing with your life.
#5
Quote by National_Anthem
E maj -> E maj 7 -> A major -> F# maj 7 -> B maj -> G# maj 7 -> C# min

I think that's it.


Don´t think there´s an E7 in there, seems right otherwise.


A few measures on, C# minor is also solidified as the tonic with a cadence.

And TS, you should take note that Spring is the first concerto of the Four Seasons, which is a set of concertos (though the actual opus contains even more concertos). Hence you´re writing about the first movement of Spring.


EDIT: and as you might notice, C# minor is the relative minor of E major.

And I´d say until the cadence it doesn´t clearly feel like C# minor - the G#7 can be heardas a secondary dominant. Since they´re relative keys it´s a bit hovering.
Last edited by descara at Dec 16, 2009,
#6
Quote by descara
Don´t think there´s an E7 in there, seems right otherwise.



Well there's certainly a diminished triad on G#, which in the context basically implies, and has the same function as a dominant 7th on E.
#7
I fail both to see or hear a diminished triad on G#. What measure, if you have the sheet music? I assume we are talking about the passage measures 47-51? If not, my bad.
#8
No, unfortunately I don't have the score. I'm fairly sure that we're talking about the same passage. If you could scan it I could show you where I was talking about.
#9
Here are the sheets for violin and cello. I couldnt upload the other intruments due to the file sizes.
Attachments:
spring-viola-a4.pdf
spring-cello-a4.pdf

One day you`re gonna wake up and you`ll be 30 years old and you won`t have done a damn thing with your life.
#12
Indeed! After I posted my last post, I sat playing around with that figure, and it struck me I had heard versions with D natural played rather than D sharp. D sharp does seem to be the most common though - but I dont know which one is historically correct. Oh well, glad we got that settled!
#13
Quote by descara
Indeed! After I posted my last post, I sat playing around with that figure, and it struck me I had heard versions with D natural played rather than D sharp. D sharp does seem to be the most common though - but I dont know which one is historically correct. Oh well, glad we got that settled!


D sharp I'm sure is correct. What Nigel Kennedy does is not a good measure of historical accuracy