#1
So how does it all go?
i dont think its improvising
Does it mean thinkingg it up in your head?

For instance
Steve Vai - Tender Surrender

i dont think that is improvised...
how does he do it? how does is instruct such a perfect solo?
#2
There's tons of little things that go into writing a solo. You should ask your teacher about it.

Here's a 2 videos on improvising, which is what most artists do when they write. They don't sit down and think: ok I'm going to play this note, then this note, etc... They usually just record themselves improvising until they find something cool, then work it into the solo.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EfBKzEXFZDw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysN31SKkroU
Those tips will carry over into composing solos, but knowledge is nothing without application so go practice them.
#3
i always thought composing was singing phrase by phrase in my head till a phrase soudns good and then writing it down
#4
Some people do it that way.
I start with a single riff most of the time and then start thinking about it, make the rest of the piece in my head and then start thinking about how it should be played..
#5
solos are usually just parts of scales that sound good with the rythem
or thats what im told
#6
Quote by Shaggy_420
solos are usually just parts of scales that sound good with the rythem
or thats what im told

Kind of, but not exactly.
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#7
I can tell you what I do - although I still kinda suck lol

If I have my guitar I improvise over a bt of the solo section on repeat until it starts to coalesce so I'm playing pretty much the same thing each time, with relatively minor changes - then I write that down/record it.

If I don't have my guitar I get guitar pro out, write the backing of the solo section in there and let that play a few times til something starts playing in my head, then write that down and expand it based on the melody from other sections and the chords/scale I've used. Then I tidy it up when I get my guitar - I nearly always end up changing some bits, chopping bits out and changing the rhythm

Occassionally I'll try singing/humming whatever is playing in my head over a bt, but unfortunately my singing sucks, so its kinda hard to transcribe it form that - none of the notes I sing generally exist on a guitar - at least not if its remotely in tune
#8
well usually what i do, and a lot of people, is i jam over the song and remember the parts i thought were good and add them into the next take. ill keep doing this until i have a solo that i have memorized and then i keep doing it until i have it clean with as little mistakes as possible.

sometimes though the first take is the best one. for example, crossroads by cream sounds like it could be have been written but it was all improv.
#9
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
well usually what i do, and a lot of people, is i jam over the song and remember the parts i thought were good and add them into the next take. ill keep doing this until i have a solo that i have memorized and then i keep doing it until i have it clean with as little mistakes as possible.


That's pretty much what I do. Although, sometimes I'll have some stuff going that I like, and in my head I'll hear what I want to do next, but I won't be able to play it fast enough just from what I'm thinking, so I'll take it slow, and just figure that part up, then practice it, and then continue the jamming.
#10
What the guys have said above is the best method really, then you can also incoporoate techniques like adding the a part of the vocal pattern to the solo, or having a harmonized section / rhythmic idea etc

Always record when you are jamming over your backing, then you can save and remember any ideas that you like
#11
Quote by Zanon
What the guys have said above is the best method really, then you can also incoporoate techniques like adding the a part of the vocal pattern to the solo, or having a harmonized section / rhythmic idea etc

Always record when you are jamming over your backing, then you can save and remember any ideas that you like


Yeah, building your solo on something in another part of the song (vocal line, rhythm, etc..) is often really good, as it makes the solo sound like it fits with that song, rather than just being random notes. Theme and variation is also very useful in soloing.
#12
I try to have a certain musical idea, or motif recurrent in the solo. Although if the solo has 2 sections (or 2 periods if they are short), I would have a different but similar motif in the second one (although achieving this is kind of hard to me lol).
However I wouldn't entirely rely on that, like someone said above, I would try incorporating parts of vocal melodies in it, or music cells used previously to add a certain flow to the solo.
It also depends if I have a certain goal with said solo...

I compose them using Guitar Pro anyway since I don't have an electric guitar, anyways...
#13
Quote by tenfold
There's tons of little things that go into writing a solo. You should ask your teacher about it.

Here's a 2 videos on improvising, which is what most artists do when they write. They don't sit down and think: ok I'm going to play this note, then this note, etc... They usually just record themselves improvising until they find something cool, then work it into the solo.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EfBKzEXFZDw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysN31SKkroU
Those tips will carry over into composing solos, but knowledge is nothing without application so go practice them.



His guitar sounds out of tune, or at least his intonation is out. But good vids.

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#14
Yeah, just mess around improvising solos for a while and start to piece together phrases that you come up with that you like.