#1
:d

i allready do alot of improvising
some improvising tips?
Last edited by Ibarshall_X at Dec 16, 2009,
#2
Did you watch the 2 videos I linked?

EDIT: Here's 2 more even...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VAH6CI0kSAs
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ly7U2LXxMo
You need to practice though. Knowing about it won't do much until you're good at applying it.
Last edited by tenfold at Dec 16, 2009,
#3
The first video that tenfold posted in the other thread was gold. Watch that shit. The second one was probably good as well but I didn't watch it.
#4
For phrasing? I sometimes try and have lyrics, or even just a kind of monologue, running through my head, and play to them. Helps a lot, provided nobody ever finds out what random phrases I'm playing to lol
#5
You now how they say the best way to be a good writer is to read alot?

Same goes for the guitar. Learning some solos from other guitarists can give you a new look at something and give you new ideas on what to do when you imporvise.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


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#8
What Zhilla said, try having like a monologue in your head, or telling a story. Aslo try playing Blues Harp, that really helped me increase my phrasing. Even after playing only for a week or something, it for me really made a difference. With a Blues Harp, it's like you're really telling a story through the thing with pronunciation and everything.

Perhaps you could try some other instruments aswell?
Guitasr:
Cort KX-Custom
ESP LTD M-200FM
Amp:
Engl Powerball
Misc:
Focusrite Scarlet 2i4
#9
Quote by pinguinpanic
What Zhilla said, try having like a monologue in your head, or telling a story. Aslo try playing Blues Harp, that really helped me increase my phrasing. Even after playing only for a week or something, it for me really made a difference. With a Blues Harp, it's like you're really telling a story through the thing with pronunciation and everything.

Perhaps you could try some other instruments aswell?


i've played the piano for many years...
ive always liked the saxophone
#11
Quote by Ibarshall_X
:d

i allready do alot of improvising
some improvising tips?



I know this sounds too simple but it's true

it's all in the music.


Listen, appreciate, practice, study, play ...absorb......
shred is gaudy music
#12
ive heard something like "singing while playing" or "call and answer way"
any other ways?

ill gladly try the saxophone approach
#14
try to use wider intervals, bend from "outside" tones, learn some melodic sequeneces, etc... thats what i try to do. sequences are basically melodic groupings to break up a scale. like go down 4 and then go back to the 2nd or 3rd note and then go down 4 again. once you know sequeneces, you can mix them up or repeat parts and it will sound more melodic.

ive been doing a lot of outside bends lately. usually just a semi ton but it adds a whole new flavour to the playing and if you do it right you can sound kind of like a slide.
#15
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
try to use wider intervals, bend from "outside" tones, learn some melodic sequeneces, etc... thats what i try to do. sequences are basically melodic groupings to break up a scale. like go down 4 and then go back to the 2nd or 3rd note and then go down 4 again. once you know sequeneces, you can mix them up or repeat parts and it will sound more melodic.

ive been doing a lot of outside bends lately. usually just a semi ton but it adds a whole new flavour to the playing and if you do it right you can sound kind of like a slide.


Sorry, usually I agree with your posts but...

If you cant build phrases with the 12 tones we have, then you probably shouldnt be concerned with blue notes yet. Also, wide intervals are really counter productive to making melodic lines. Youll find that if you really study melody, that the movement is either stepwise, or in thirds. Greater intervals regularly exist in tons of phrases. But for every leap, theres probably 5 movements of a step.
#16
Quote by tubatom868686
Sorry, usually I agree with your posts but...

If you cant build phrases with the 12 tones we have, then you probably shouldnt be concerned with blue notes yet. Also, wide intervals are really counter productive to making melodic lines. Youll find that if you really study melody, that the movement is either stepwise, or in thirds. Greater intervals regularly exist in tons of phrases. But for every leap, theres probably 5 movements of a step.

alright sure, but i was under the impression that he could already make melodic lines using the 12 tones. i actually wasnt talking about blue notes either, i was just talking about bending up from a note outside of the scale or bending from a note inside the scale to a note in the scale, but in a semi tone manner. so for outside tones, ill just find the note i want, and then bend from a note a semi tone away. i just find people tend to do bends mostly with full tones so i try to add more semi tone bends to my playing to spice it up. using outside tones also throws the listener off for a moment which can seem more melodic. it sounds less like you are just playing a scale.

i kind of disagree with the part about intervals. sure if you just had really wide intervals all over the place it would be distracting. i guess i should have been more clear. usually people tend to play the scale in seconds, maybe thirds at times. i didnt really mean he should ONLY use wide intervals, but try to put some in there. sometimes playing a big leap can add a lot. thats really all i ment. like play some 2nds and 3rds and then jump up a 7th or something. also, things like arpeggios would have wider intervals than if i just played a scale in 2nds. i often use 4th and 5ths in my playing and they sound fine. i dont do it ALL the time though. also, with what i said with sequences, some have wide intervals. i could go down 5 notes and then go back to the 2nd note and go down 5 more for example.

anyways, i was just naming off some of the things ive been doing to spice up my playing. i guess i wasnt clear though.
Last edited by Blind In 1 Ear at Dec 18, 2009,
#18
Quote by tubatom868686
Fair enough. But those notes are still called blue notes

semi tone bends arent blue notes. half a semi tone bend is a blue note. a common example is the "blue third" which you will hear harmonica players talk about. its not quite a major, and not quite a minor third. you can have other blue notes but thats the most common one. another one could be the 5 hole draw on harmonica. it doesnt bend a full semi tone but it bends a bit.

i think you are thinking of the flatted fifth. its usually called the blue note but its not the same as an actual blue note. its just called that because it make the blues scale. sometimes i will bend up from that note, but the note im bending to isnt a blue note. remember, i mentioned to bend to a note WITHIN in the scale you are using. blue notes arent inside the scale, they arent really outside of it either. they are inbetween. now of course, this could spice up your playing as well and help with prasing but its not really what i was talking about before.