#1
I'm having trouble writing songs that progress. They usually start out pretty good, but never seem to go anywhere and get repetitive. I'll write a nice sounding guitar part, then another, then I get stuck and I'm not able to write another part. Any help with writing songs that go somewhere?
_____________________________________________________
"Everyone's life ends, but no one ever completes it."
#2
Quote by editthesadparts
I'm having trouble writing songs that progress. They usually start out pretty good, but never seem to go anywhere and get repetitive. I'll write a nice sounding guitar part, then another, then I get stuck and I'm not able to write another part. Any help with writing songs that go somewhere?


I was in the same boat and just embraced it. You could do that and just make sure all of your songs are around the three minute mark or shorter. Most rock music only has two or three distinct guitar parts per song, so you're right on track for that anyway. Don't forget that the guitar doesn't have to (and shouldn't) always be playing unless you're doing some coffee shop finger picking or some solo work along those lines.

If you do want to develop more complex, less repetitive pieces, remember that it's all about dynamics and orchestration, not about a variety of parts written for each instrument. In most 8 minute rock songs, there are going to be a lot of places where there's no singing, plenty of places where there's no lead guitar. Even the rhythmic instruments might come in and out, so you don't have to worry about coming up with 8 minutes of lead guitar content, doing so would make a cheesy, static song.

The variations that each instrument does do in a longer piece are usually just that, variations. They don't play completely different parts, they play slightly altered versions of what they were playing earlier, so you really could write a 10 minute song that only has two distinct guitar melodies and a bridge; you'd just write slight variations of these melodies as the song progressed to change the feel. Using four variations on what is basically a chorus and a verse is a lot easier for listeners to follow and connect than eight different sections anyway.

Hope that makes sense: variation instead of innovation, dynamics and orchestration more important than melodic change.