#1
I have a line 6 (yeah I know people hate them) and a schecter with emg pickups.

Anybody know why this might happen? Sounds just like it has a distortion pedal on.

Thanks in advance. I wasn't sure where to put this so I put it here.

ALSO: just noticed when my guitars on but not being played it kind of buzzes a little with random pauses in between.
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#2
well with line 6 you can put distortion on any channel so make sure the drive knob is on zero. the buzzing is most likely just interference
#3
i have a spider III 15, and it does that if i turn the drive knob up on the clean setting.

so, yeah, like LastBaron said, check that. also, dont some EMGs add distortion because they're specifically for metal-ish stuff? are yours like that?
Quote by God
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#4
EMGs are just active pickups. They have a preamp that is designed to naturally overdrive an amp. They work best on tube amps for this reason.

Your pickups are probably just causing the amp to naturally overdrive. The headroom on solid states is fairly low, IIRC. Your cables might also be messed up (hence the odd buzzing). Try turning the guitar's volume knob down. If that decreases the buzz and gets rid of the drive on the clean channel, then it's the pickups. If not, get a new cable and tell us the results.
#5
strum softer and roll back your volume.
i used to be a mod, then i took an arrow in the knee.
#6
Quote by Shinn
also, dont some EMGs add distortion because they're specifically for metal-ish stuff? are yours like that?
Pickups don't work like that. No pickup does.

All a pickup can do in relation to distortion is increase or decrease output from your guitar. Stronger output hits the front end of your amp harder which results in harder signal clipping - aka more distortion. Less output does the opposite. This doesn't really have any relevance with solid state amps though - especially a modelling amp like a Line 6 Spider III - because they don't distort in the same way that traditional valve amps do - the signal will get clipped as the amp is fed higher output but it doens't clip in the same way a valve amp does; it won't react to your playing properly and most of all it plain won't sound any good. Some solid state amps are made to not clip at all because solid state clipping is so horrible; this is actually why active pickups with certain very high-quality solid state amps are a popular choice for professional jazz players, because they get the ultra low background noise levels that active pickups provide yet some better solid state amps can be cranked to performance volumes with zero signal clipping even with the high output that active pickups have.
In terms of playing metal, active pickups are only of use if you have a naturally high-gain all-valve amp. Suffice to say, using them with a Line 6 Spider III is about the most inappropriate, most pointless thing you can do.



As far as OP's problem goes; turn your gain control down, for the love of god either keep your guitar's volume control far down, use a volume pedal before the amp to drastically lower your output before the amp, or change those active pickups for passive pickups. There is literally not one single worse, most pointless combination than active pickups with a solid state modelling amp. It's like using a banjo for death metal.
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Last edited by MrFlibble at Dec 16, 2009,
#7
Quote by MrFlibble
Pickups don't work like that. No pickup does.

All a pickup can do in relation to distortion is increase or decrease output from your guitar. Stronger output hits the front end of your amp harder which results in harder signal clipping - aka more distortion. Less output does the opposite. This doesn't really have any relevance with solid state amps though - especially a modelling amp like a Line 6 Spider III - because they don't distort in the same way that traditional valve amps do - the signal will get clipped as the amp is fed higher output but it doens't clip in the same way a valve amp does; it won't react to your playing properly and most of all it plain won't sound any good. This is actually why active pickups with certain very highquality solid state amps are a popular choice for profeessional jazz players, because they get the ultra low background noise levels that active pickups provide yet some better solid state amps can be cranked to performance volumes with zero signal clipping even with the high output that active pickups have.
In terms of playing metal, active pickups are only of use if you have a naturally high-gain all-valve amp. Suffice to say, using them with a Line 6 Spider III is about the most inappropriate, most pointless thing you can do.


that was informative. haha. thanks.
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#8
Quote by MrFlibble
or change those active pickups for passive pickups. There is literally not one single worse, most pointless combination than active pickups with a solid state modelling amp. It's like using a banjo for death metal.


omg hate much?

maybe this person is just trying to play the guitar and doesnt know all of this... hence the asking questions about buzz in the first place...
#9
I've been playing this same guitar and amp for like 2 years by the way. It's not an issue of settings or cords. Thanks for the input guys but it really is a weird problem. It sounds like full distortion when it's on clean and when it's on full distortion it sounds the same only too much bass and it sounds kinda ****ed up
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#10
when's the last time you changed the batteries?
i used to be a mod, then i took an arrow in the knee.