#1
looking to get a new amp as i have one of those Marshall MG mini stacks (its horrible) and thats only 15 watts and it makes my bedroom sound like a stadium. and looking at the randall XL series that are pumping out 480 watts!!!! with the half stack cab. just wondering how load it would be?

(i know next to nothing about amps)
better shred than dead
#2
Watts =/= volume.

Watts = power/headroom (how loud of a signal your amp can produce before it reaches clipping stages)

Volume is determined more by the amp's circuitry (this is why you can take two amps of the same wattage and most likely one will be louder than the other).


However, "loudness" is subjective. What you may think is loud someone else may not think is loud. However, a Randall XL half stack is going to be pretty freaking loud no matter who you are lol.
#3
FYI, the Randall is not 480W RMS, so you're looking at the wrong numbers. Just letting you know.
EDIT: Never mind, I was wrong. Upon checking, it turns out that it runs 480W at 2 Ohms. Odd...

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Last edited by Dr.Pain-MD at Dec 17, 2009,
#4
Quote by i_am_metalhead
a Randall XL half stack is going to be pretty freaking loud no matter who you are lol.



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#5
My Roost is 120w. My cab is rated at 800w so hardly any loss there. on my bridht channel at 2 vol, playing my not too loud Yamaha, st my first gig with it, things started falling off the end wall of the room. Pictures, wall lamps. Any louder and I swear the paint would have peeled.
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#6
unless you find a cab wired at 2ohms, you'll be running at a lower wattage. Though even if you get a 16ohm cab it will still be able to get damn loud

Good news though, there is a volume knob.
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#7
so can you put any cab with any head, e.g. would you have to put a Randall head with a Randall cab?
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#8
Quote by shredda2084
so can you put any cab with any head, e.g. would you have to put a Randall head with a Randall cab?


As long as the cab has a wattage handling of at least the same or more than the output of the head and as long as you match impedance.
#9
To expand on the above post.

Say you got a 150W amp head made by Buttslut.

You don't need a cab made by Buttslut, a Piehole cab will do just nicely, so long as wattage and impedance match up.

Your Piehole cab will need to be at least 150W, to match your Buttslut head. If it's a 100W cab, you might blow your Piehole. If it's 300W, it'll handle your Buttslut nicely.

Now say your Buttslut is 150W at 8 ohms. This is your ohm impedance. This MUST be matched to your cab. So, your Piehole had better be 8 ohms or your Buttslut won't work with it, and you'll need a new one. Say you've got an old 150W 8 ohms RectumRocket cab sitting around collecting dust? That's perfectly matched to your Buttslut, so hook it up and rock out.

Edit:: Bit of advice; Mixing and matching cabs with different heads is a great way to fine-tune your sound, as most cabs have different voicings (e.g. British, US Modern, so forth) and will sound different with different heads. Some examples: A marshall cab will add that british feel to your head, accentuating your top-mids. A mesa boogie cab will give you a darker, more scooped tone. This isn't set-in-stone, you can still get a dark scooped tone through a marshall cab, this is just a thought for you to consider. Try different cabs and see what you like best.
Quote by fly135
Great list Rutch. On re-reading this one I'd have to say Solid State means not liquid or gas.

I figured it out.
Last edited by Ishiga at Dec 17, 2009,
#10
Quote by Ishiga
To expand on the above post.

Say you got a 150W amp head made by Buttslut.

You don't need a cab made by Buttslut, a Piehole cab will do just nicely, so long as wattage and impedance match up.

Your Piehole cab will need to be at least 150W, to match your Buttslut head. If it's a 100W cab, you might blow your Piehole. If it's 300W, it'll handle your Buttslut nicely.

Now say your Buttslut is 150W at 8 ohms. This is your ohm impedance. This MUST be matched to your cab. So, your Piehole had better be 8 ohms or your Buttslut won't work with it, and you'll need a new one. Say you've got an old 150W 8 ohms RectumRocket cab sitting around collecting dust? That's perfectly matched to your Buttslut, so hook it up and rock out.

Edit:: Bit of advice; Mixing and matching cabs with different heads is a great way to fine-tune your sound, as most cabs have different voicings (e.g. British, US Modern, so forth) and will sound different with different heads. Some examples: A marshall cab will add that british feel to your head, accentuating your top-mids. A mesa boogie cab will give you a darker, more scooped tone. This isn't set-in-stone, you can still get a dark scooped tone through a marshall cab, this is just a thought for you to consider. Try different cabs and see what you like best.


thank you, helped a lot


better shred than dead
#11
Always a pleasure.
Quote by fly135
Great list Rutch. On re-reading this one I'd have to say Solid State means not liquid or gas.

I figured it out.
#12
Quote by Ishiga
Now say your Buttslut is 150W at 8 ohms. This is your ohm impedance. This MUST be matched to your cab. So, your Piehole had better be 8 ohms or your Buttslut won't work with it, and you'll need a new one. Say you've got an old 150W 8 ohms RectumRocket cab sitting around collecting dust? That's perfectly matched to your Buttslut, so hook it up and rock out.


First off, impedance is measured in ohms, so "ohm impedance" isn't the correct term.

Second, the rules are different for SS amps and tube amps. For SS amps you can go with a cab that can handle a load equal or greater than the output of a head. So lets say you're head has an impedance of 4 ohms, you can safely use a 4 ohm, 8 ohm, or 16 ohm cab.

For tube amps you should always match impedance whenever you can. For example, if your head has an output of 4 ohms you're gonna want to match it with a cab that is rated to handle a 4 ohm load. However, you can use a "safe mismatch" which is a cab that is rated to handle double the output of the head. So if you have a head with a 4 ohm output you could safely use a cab that is rated to handle an 8 ohm load. You will lose some volume and tone though and it can put undue stress on your OT and shorten its life, but it won't result in a catastrophic meltdown.
Last edited by i_am_metalhead at Dec 17, 2009,
#13
Quote by shredda2084
looking to get a new amp as i have one of those Marshall MG mini stacks (its horrible) and thats only 15 watts and it makes my bedroom sound like a stadium. and looking at the randall XL series that are pumping out 480 watts!!!! with the half stack cab. just wondering how load it would be?

(i know next to nothing about amps)

The form factor (whether it's a combo or head and cab) has absolutely no bearing on how loud an amp will be - all it means is you have two bits instead of one. My 60 watt combo will shake things off the walls and will completely drown out a 100 watt Marshall MG half stack. More speakers doesn't make an amp "louder" either, you'll spread the sound out a little more and move more air, and there'll be less load on those speakers. But a 10 watt amp plugged into a 100 watt rated cab is still a 10 watt amp....if you pour 1 litre of water into a 10 litre bucket you've still only got 1 litre of water.

The wattage is the power of the amp but even that's not a definitive guide as to how loud it will be, a tube amp will usually sound a lot louder than a solid state amp of the same wattage because of the richer harmonic content. Also wattage doesn't tell you how much of that power is actually usable - if you have a cheap 100 watt solid state amp with cruddy speakers then chances are you'll be lucky if you get half that before the speaker farts out or the amp clips horribly.

Finally the conversion from wattage to volume isn't linear, it's logarithmic, a 100 watt amp isn't 10 times louder than a 10 watt amp, in real terms the increase is about 100%, so twice as loud. That also means the gain in volume decreases the more you increase the wattage. You can't just go on "watts", they're a next to meaningless number that people tend to overly fixate on - quality of materials, the actual design of the amp, construction of the speaker enclosure and efficiency of the speakers all have more of a say as to how that amp will actually perform, ultimately the wattage is irrelevant as long as the amp's loud enough and produces the sound you're looking for.
Actually called Mark!

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Last edited by steven seagull at Dec 17, 2009,
#14
Quote by steven seagull
The form factor (whether it's a combo or haed and cab) has absolutely no bearing on how loud an amp will be - all it means is you have two bits instead of one.

The wattage is the power of the amp but even that's not a definitive guide as to how loud it will be, a tube amp will usually sound a lot louder than a solid state amp of the same wattage because of the richer harmonic content. Also wattage doesn't tell you how much of that power is actually usable - if you have a cheap 100 watt solid state amp with cruddy speakers then chances are you'll be lucky if you get half that before the speaker farts out or the amp clips horribly.

Finally the conversion from wattage to volume isn't linear, a 100 watt amp isn't 10 times louder than a 10 watt amp, in real terms the increase is about 100%, so twice as loud. Again you can't just go on "watts", they're a next to meaningless number that people tend to overly fixate on - quality of materials, the actual design of the amp, construction of the speaker enclosure and efficiency of the speakers all have more of a say as to how that amp will actually perform, ultimately the wattage is irrelevant as long as the amp's loud enough and produces the sound you're looking for.


Hey duck boy, we've already established the majority of this.
#15
Funnily enough not really
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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#18
Quote by iampeter
is clipping produced by the amp or the speakers ability to handle volumes?

is clipping the same as distortion/overdrive or is it not desirable?
I don't think clipping has anything to do with the speakers. I think it has something to do with the preamp/poweramp, though I'm not 100% sure.

It depends on what clipping. Hard clipping (such as EMG's through a bad SS amp or boosting a bad SS amp with an overdrive) is really an ear sore and is not what you want.

However, soft clipping (tube amps being cranked), sounds very musically pleasing to the ears if that's what your going for.
#19
Quote by i_am_metalhead
Hey duck boy






you sir deserve that^

yeah my half stacks well.... 120 watt tube head and 2x12 cab (quarter stack maybe?) is as quiet as i want it....

ohh how i love the THD Hotplate
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Last edited by kakos at Dec 17, 2009,
#20
Quote by steven seagull
ultimately the wattage is irrelevant as long as the amp's loud enough and produces the sound you're looking for.
Or not loud enough I.E. sludgy tones from a 15watt tube amp.

Solid state power sections also sound like crap when they are pushed beyond their ability. Thats why you see so many SS amps with 150+ watts, while rarely a tube amp over 120.

Personally, I would take the 50/60 watt version of a tube amp long before the 100/120, so it gets a little bit of power amp overdrive when getting over a drummer.

What do you like to play? Budget? Gigging? There are so many options now days for amps, you better feel like a kid in a candy store or your doing something wrong.
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#21
Quote by iampeter
is clipping produced by the amp or the speakers ability to handle volumes?

is clipping the same as distortion/overdrive or is it not desirable?


I actually did some reading on that a few hours back. Let's put my ability to regurgitate shit to the test.

If I'm not mistaken, don't nuke me if I'm wrong, clipping is a form of limiting the waveform of a signal, which is the cause of OD / DS. Both tubes and solid state transistors operate in a set voltage range. Your signals' voltage changes rapidly, but stays within a set region. A gain circuit is designed to push the voltage of your signal just beyond the limits of transistors / tubes. That's why you get a different sound from a DS/OD pedal through a tube amp than a transistor, because of voltage tolerances.

By pushing your signal just above the limits, your amp will begin to clip the signal to operate within its' voltage region, which is where your sound begins to distort. By playing aggressively, you get a harsher peak voltage and thus heavier clipping, more gain. Play softly and it cleans up quite a bit.

Hard clipping is merely a hi-gain clip resulting in, well, you guessed it, high gain. Has nothing to do with pickups or ss/valve, just how much the amp has to clip. I like to look at it this way: Drive = soft clipping. Distortion = hard clipping.

Here's a chart to clarify a bit. yaaaay, wikipedia.


Someone please, for the love of god, slap the piss outta me if I'm wrong. This took way too damn long and makes me look like too much of an asshole to be wrong.
Quote by fly135
Great list Rutch. On re-reading this one I'd have to say Solid State means not liquid or gas.

I figured it out.
#22
so much info guys, thanks for the help, i now need to spend a whole day in a my local guitar shop trying them all out, i will take lunch
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Last edited by shredda2084 at Dec 18, 2009,