#1
I got a Blackheart handsome devil recently, and love it to bits. Only problem is its lack of an effects loop. Can I run pedals between the amp and speaker using a speaker cable, as a dummy effects load or will the resistors etc inside any guitar pedal wreak havok on the amp/speaker? Don't wanna go blowing stuff up, you know?
Gear:

Is what some junkies refer to heroin as. For me it's just loads of wires and good sturdy housing, but just as addictive.
#2
I wouldn't recommend doing that. I'd just run them out in front of the amp. Plenty of amps don't have effects loops.
#3
Quote by eyebanez333
I wouldn't recommend doing that. I'd just run them out in front of the amp. Plenty of amps don't have effects loops.


Yeah, I'm actualy afraid to try it.
Gear:

Is what some junkies refer to heroin as. For me it's just loads of wires and good sturdy housing, but just as addictive.
#4
You'll blow you pedals up running them between the amp and speaker.
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Fender Hotrod Deluxe
Roland JC-120
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Crate GX-15
#5
Quote by TheRectified
You'll blow you pedals up running them between the amp and speaker.


That's all I needs to know!

Won't be doing it any time soon then.
Gear:

Is what some junkies refer to heroin as. For me it's just loads of wires and good sturdy housing, but just as addictive.
#6
Guaranteed amp & pedal wreckage.
Although now I'm curious just how it would sound...

KIDDING! Do not!
#7
If you do try it please have a video camera focused on the pedal so we can all appreciate the fireworks.
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#8
Quote by Cathbard
If you do try it please have a video camera focused on the pedal so we can all appreciate the fireworks.


If I ever do, I'll be sure to record it.
Gear:

Is what some junkies refer to heroin as. For me it's just loads of wires and good sturdy housing, but just as addictive.
#9
Quote by Cathbard
If you do try it please have a video camera focused on the pedal so we can all appreciate the fireworks.



It lets out all your "tone smoke".
Mesa Rev. G Triple Rectifier
Mesa Series II Single Rectifier
Mesa Stage 1 Stiletto Deuce
Marhshall DSL 100w
Fender '67 Bassman
Fender Roc Pro 1000 (x2)
Fender Hotrod Deluxe
Roland JC-120
Blackstar HT-5H
Jet City JCA20H
Crate GX-15
#11
Quote by TheRectified
You'll blow you pedals up running them between the amp and speaker.

I have no idea why his pedals would blow up, but it would definitely strain and possibly kaboom his OT. It's pretty unlikely to explode though, not a ridiculous amount of current.
#12
Quote by imicius
I have no idea why his pedals would blow up, but it would definitely strain and possibly kaboom his OT. It's pretty unlikely to explode though, not a ridiculous amount of current.



The blow up was an exaggeration. But pedals aren't meant to handle the kind of current an amp puts out. Running them between the head and cab will damage/destroy them.
Mesa Rev. G Triple Rectifier
Mesa Series II Single Rectifier
Mesa Stage 1 Stiletto Deuce
Marhshall DSL 100w
Fender '67 Bassman
Fender Roc Pro 1000 (x2)
Fender Hotrod Deluxe
Roland JC-120
Blackstar HT-5H
Jet City JCA20H
Crate GX-15
#13
not having a load on the amp would cause the OT to go...

as far as the pedals go...they're not meant to have that type of signal (in terms of frequency, voltage, current, etc.) going through them. The signals going into the amp (i.e. guitars, effects, where your pedals should be) are different than the signals leaving the amplifier going to the speakers.
#14
There's a chance that, when run in bypass, a true bypass pedal would pass the current.
Utterly pointless, though, and iffy besides.
Power flowing through the circuit, though? Yeep. Your amp's power would be flowing through (most likely) various ICs, transistors, etc., which would NOT work, to say nothing of tiny resistors and caps and such that aren't rated for anything over line level.
No, it wouldn't "blow up" in a fireball, but it would "fry" the pedal.

Even if the pedal could pass some kind of current, once the pedal DID fry, you'd be running an open or short to output, probably open, which is the same thing as running your amp with no speaker attached. This would take out the OT. Until that time, whatever impedance the pedal circuit itself presented to the amp would be way off base, also troubling yout OT.
#15
Quote by eyebanez333
not having a load on the amp would cause the OT to go...

as far as the pedals go...they're not meant to have that type of signal (in terms of frequency, voltage, current, etc.) going through them. The signals going into the amp (i.e. guitars, effects, where your pedals should be) are different than the signals leaving the amplifier going to the speakers.

Wait, help me out here. I'm seeing in my mind the setup: Guitar>> amp>> pedal>> speaker.

How's it supposed to go?

What kind of signal is it recieving and what kind should it be recieving? (ex. AC or DC power, hi frequencies or low freduencies)
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#16
Quote by FrankieHCO
Wait, help me out here. I'm seeing in my mind the setup: Guitar>> amp>> pedal>> speaker.

How's it supposed to go?

What kind of signal is it recieving and what kind should it be recieving? (ex. AC or DC power, hi frequencies or low freduencies)


It's SUPPOSED to go Guitar >>> pedal >>> amp >>> speaker.

Both guitar and amp signal will be AC, and frequency is of course determined entirely by what note you're playing.

A guitar typically puts out around 300 mv tops.
#17
^ 300 mv?
Is this process also applicable to basses?
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Quote by bloodtrocuted93
They will be twin boys named God and Satan and I will make them fight each other.

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Quote by sg255
If I cross the street to get away from them, then it's a latino.
#18
Quote by FrankieHCO
^ 300 mv?
Is this process also applicable to basses?


Couldn't tell you for sure, although I'd imagine it's about the same, give or take half a volt. (well, not take...)

Obviously, active pups (common in basses, as far as I know) would be a great deal more, but every passive guitar pup I've measured has been well below 300mv at heavy strumming.

I'm no authority here, but I can't imagine any pedal taking more than 12 or so volts without extreme clipping, possibly damage.

I've measured 50 volts at the speaker of a typical 100 watt amp.
Granted, the handsome devil is no 100 watt amp, and the impedance of a pedal would certainly change things, but the idea of putting a pedal inline with speaker output is something I would NEVER try.

If you want the math, try this:
P = (V^2)/(2*R) so: V = SQRT[ P*2*R ]

where:
P = Output power (average)
V = Output voltage (peak)
R = Output load resistance
#19
Strange question indeed. Are you daft?

Nothing goes between the head and the cab but speaker cables and maybe an attenuator. And make sure you got the right ohm output to your cab.

That aside, I have a Handsome Devil head/cab myself and they are sweet. What makes mine sweet? Mullard RI tubes! The stock tubes sucks.
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#20
Quote by Rutch
Couldn't tell you for sure, although I'd imagine it's about the same, give or take half a volt. (well, not take...)

Obviously, active pups (common in basses, as far as I know) would be a great deal more, but every passive guitar pup I've measured has been well below 300mv at heavy strumming.

I'm no authority here, but I can't imagine any pedal taking more than 12 or so volts without extreme clipping, possibly damage.

I've measured 50 volts at the speaker of a typical 100 watt amp.
Granted, the handsome devil is no 100 watt amp, and the impedance of a pedal would certainly change things, but the idea of putting a pedal inline with speaker output is something I would NEVER try.

If you want the math, try this:
P = (V^2)/(2*R) so: V = SQRT[ P*2*R ]

where:
P = Output power (average)
V = Output voltage (peak)
R = Output load resistance

What's an active pup? and a passive pup?

What's "mv" mean?

What does it mean for a pedal to 'clip'?

V = SQRT[ P*2*R ] And when I read this, I thought of a girl's legs split= squirting and she went from Player 2 Robot

i'm not proud of myself...
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I lol'd

First lol row
Quote by bloodtrocuted93
They will be twin boys named God and Satan and I will make them fight each other.

http://www.virtual-bubblewrap.com/index.shtml
Quote by sg255
If I cross the street to get away from them, then it's a latino.
#21
Now im no amp tech, but i think that pedals aren't designed to handle the current after the signal reaches the power amp because it's much stronger than the weak signal your pickups and preamp produce.
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#22
Quote by FrankieHCO
What's an active pup? and a passive pup?

What's "mv" mean?

What does it mean for a pedal to 'clip'?

V = SQRT[ P*2*R ] And when I read this, I thought of a girl's legs split= squirting and she went from Player 2 Robot

i'm not proud of myself...


A passive pickup (which is "standard" on guitars) is coils of wire around magnets, creating a focused magnetic field, which a vibrating guitar string interrupts, creating a signal.

An active pickup includes an onboard preamp, essentially.

mv = millivolt.

Make no mistake, your pickups are little more than crude generators. To be technically correct, they are transducers. The electricity they create is slight, hence the need for an amplifier.

Either way, pedals are designed to receive this small signal and distort it.
What comes out of the amp, going to the speakers, is real power, which would destroy the small, low-power components in a pedal.

"Clipping" happens when the pedal can no longer process the full waveform of signal.
Better explanation here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clipping_(audio)

SQRT = square root.

Get yer mind outta the gutter, boy!