#1
Hello UG,

I've been playing seriously now for about 1 year and have decided to really sit down and get into theory. As the tittle says I was wondering when say using a D5 Power chord would you start say the A minor pentatonic on the root of D?

I have a guitar pro 5 attachment of something very short I made to show you what I am talking about. The only two power chords are D5 and F5. (Yes i know about the lessons on the site but I still want to clear it up here with other users before reading into them)

Thanks for any help
Attachments:
Randomsong1324.gp5
#2
Quote by Trogdor1324
Hello UG,

I've been playing seriously now for about 1 year and have decided to really sit down and get into theory. As the tittle says I was wondering when say using a D5 Power chord would you start say the A minor pentatonic on the root of D?

I have a guitar pro 5 attachment of something very short I made to show you what I am talking about. The only two power chords are D5 and F5. (Yes i know about the lessons on the site but I still want to clear it up here with other users before reading into them)

Thanks for any help


I don't have your program to hear it but based upon the example you gave, I'd say play a D Pent minor, which I think is what you mean by start the Am Pent (typically guitarists I have run across are introduced to Pent Minor Box shapes in the Key of A) - your F is the b3 of D, making it minor.

In our Academy we teach our students to look at the overall tones of your progression - since you are using X5 chords, harmonically they can function as Major or Minor, but since that Power chord F is in your example as well, wed consider that eliminates it being Major overall, because the absence of the F#. But if it were D5 to A5 we'd say try both Pent major and minor.
#3
Thank you the post helped. I was also wondering if using the circle of fifths at all would help?
#5
Quote by Trogdor1324
Hello UG,

I've been playing seriously now for about 1 year and have decided to really sit down and get into theory. As the tittle says I was wondering when say using a D5 Power chord would you start say the A minor pentatonic on the root of D?

I have a guitar pro 5 attachment of something very short I made to show you what I am talking about. The only two power chords are D5 and F5. (Yes i know about the lessons on the site but I still want to clear it up here with other users before reading into them)

Thanks for any help

When playing, you don't "start" anywhere in particular. A scale is a series of notes that work together, you hardly ever play them in sequence though unless you're specifically practicing scales. The pattern just shows you notes you can use, it's not telling you how, when or why to use them.

What you usually do is find the key that the chords fit into, and that in turn wil suggest a scale. Once you know what scale to use it's up to you to decide how to use it, any of the notes are fair game, as are the notes outside the scale. Each note will, however, sound different depending on what it's being played over and that's how you make a decision - if a note will give you the sound you're looking for then you use it.

Powerchords aren't really much help for learning theory as they're neither major or minor, which makes nailing down a key difficult. However with your example you wouldn't use A anything, you've only got D and F as roots in there, therefore the only scales you use could possibly use would likewise have D or F as the root. To make things easier for yourself change the chords to Dmin and F major then see how D minor pentatonic sounds over them.
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