#1
I posted this over on the Bass guitar forum and didn't get too many responses. Take a look at this: http://www.cavepassivepedals.com.au Does anybody here know about how Cave pedals (or any other passive pedals for that matter) work? There's no power supply at all coming into these pedals. How on earth do they work then?
#2
There does appear to be some discussion about these pedals on various forums. I'm curious about them as well, so did some Googling and found reviews at musformation.com and Talk Bass, as well as active discussions at Talk Bass, The Gear Page and Harmony Central. The reviews say there is no volume drop, so maybe they're not the same concept as passive pedals from the "old days"?
#4
Even if there's no volume drop, I don't really see the point. They sound pretty bad and there's barely any advantage to a passive pedal.
The idea of a passive overdrive is almost laughable. I can sort of see a passive fuzz working out, but the clips sound quite bad so I'll stick with my battery fuzzes.
The only one that was remotely plausible to me was the cosmic swell, but there are several other pedals that do a better job.
#5
Quote by forsaknazrael
Passive circuits can't boost frequencies, only cut. Fact.


The passive tone stack used in a lot of Fender amps has tons of boost. For example, "flat" on my Showman is 2-10-2, so there's plenty of scope to boost the bass and treble.
#6
^That is incorrect. The tone stack is still only capable of cutting frequencies. Fenders tend not to have a lot of mid content, so it might sound like you're boosting treble, but really the amp was very, very trebley before and you're just letting more of that through. You cannot, by definition, boost frequencies with a passive circuit.
#7
To further Roc's point, every control on an amplifier is just an attenuation of what the amp would sound like hooked up to the pre and power circuits with transformers and nothing else. In other words, other than some signal loss that any circuit with pots and whatnot adds, your amp with everything on 10 would sound the same as not having the control circuits added. Many have other filters too, but these are not controllable. Therefore, if a pedal had no outside source of power, it could only take away from your signal.
#8
Quote by Chetbango
Therefore, if a pedal had no outside source of power, it could only take away from your signal.


The reviews I've read in other forums seem to suggest otherwise. The reviews seem very clear, for the Grunt pedal in particular, that's there is no volume drop, and in fact the Grunt adds a boost. Maybe there's some clever technology being employed with these ones?
#9
I don't think you're understanding the part where you cannot add signal unless there is a power source. There may be a clever trick being used to make it sound like there's no signal loss, or even a little boost, but if there is no power source it is physically impossible for the output signal to be stronger (or even the same strength, due to transmission loss) than the input.

The most likely thing is that it EQs the signal such that it appears to be boosted, or alternatively distorts the signal a bit, which people mistake as a boost. At best it is an illusion of a louder signal.
#12
Prolly hard to tell in the lounge room, but listening to the video there does seem to be a boost?
#13
It sounds like they bumped the mids a little, so it sounds a tiny bit louder. On the other hand, it's barely audible on the clean setting and sounds horrible on the dirty setting, so that's hardly a victory.
#14
Quote by Roc8995
It sounds like they bumped the mids a little, so it sounds a tiny bit louder. On the other hand, it's barely audible on the clean setting and sounds horrible on the dirty setting, so that's hardly a victory.


+1

I see absolutely no reason to buy this over an active pedal.
E-peen:
Rhodes Gemini
Fryette Ultra Lead
Peavey 6505
THD Flexi 50

Gibson R0 Prototype
EBMM JP13 Rosewood
Fender CS Mary Kaye

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