#1
Ive been playing regularly 1-2 hrs a day for a few months now and recently experianced some weird pain in my forearm. I usually concentrate on lead work but after running through some bar chords had pain on the underside of my forearm bettween the wrist and elbow. It is sore to the touch also like a deep bruise.
Any suggestions or similar injuries.
#2
Well then stop doing whatever you're doing. Duh. Playing guitar isn't supposed to hurt.

You might also look at how you're gripping the neck and move to the most natural and comfortable possible position.
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“Life is on the wire…the rest is just waiting” - Papa Wallenda
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#3
the only thing ive done different is that I normally play with my thumb over the neck and tried playing in the Corect way with thumb pressing on back of neck.
Would this change cause it?
#4
Quote by jjram33
the only thing ive done different is that I normally play with my thumb over the neck and tried playing in the Corect way with thumb pressing on back of neck.
Would this change cause it?


**** yes. Stop doing that. It's typically a bad idea no matter how much a few bedroom players advocate it. It's certainly not "Correct" in some general sense. Sometimes you need to move your thumb (for example, barre chords) but the thumb behind the neck position is somewhat unnatural and makes for wrist problems if done too much or too dramatically.
GMW hot-rod telecaster
GMW soloist
PRS Custom 24
The Illegal Les Paul
CAE 3+SE
Soldano SM-100R
Splawn 4x12

“Life is on the wire…the rest is just waiting” - Papa Wallenda
Substitute the stage for the wire, and he's got it.
Last edited by Even Bigger D at Dec 18, 2009,
#6
no prob
GMW hot-rod telecaster
GMW soloist
PRS Custom 24
The Illegal Les Paul
CAE 3+SE
Soldano SM-100R
Splawn 4x12

“Life is on the wire…the rest is just waiting” - Papa Wallenda
Substitute the stage for the wire, and he's got it.
#7
Quote by Even Bigger D
but the thumb behind the neck position is somewhat unnatural and makes for wrist problems if done too much or too dramatically.

+1 to this... my wrist is all kinds of messed up because of this and computer games...
#8
**** yes. Stop doing that. It's typically a bad idea no matter how much a few bedroom players advocate it. It's certainly not "Correct" in some general sense. Sometimes you need to move your thumb (for example, barre chords) but the thumb behind the neck position is somewhat unnatural and makes for wrist problems if done too much or too dramatically.


If it's causing problems, you're doing it wrong - I would guess the threadstarters thumb points down towards the headstock when he's putting the thumb behind the neck.

Imagine if you try to hold a pencil between thumb and your four fingers - the thumb goes in the middle, with each of the fingers exerting equal pressure.

There's also some tips regarding barre chords in the main sticky - namely that you don't need to press down with the whole of your first finger and that you should try using more the side than the pad as it's bonier and applies pressure better.
#9
The issue isn't whether he's doing it right or wrong. It's whether he should be doing it at all. And the answer, since he's injuring himself, is clearly no.
GMW hot-rod telecaster
GMW soloist
PRS Custom 24
The Illegal Les Paul
CAE 3+SE
Soldano SM-100R
Splawn 4x12

“Life is on the wire…the rest is just waiting” - Papa Wallenda
Substitute the stage for the wire, and he's got it.
#10
I would suggest he takes a break, definitely, but if he's going to play barre chords that's the only sensible way to play them unless he has huge hands.

Have you got a teacher jjram33?
#11
I get this stuff too actually, but I really don't know where to place that feeling.
I get this tingly burning sensation like when you just worked out like, training muscles and stuff. Since I'm only a beginner (been at it for 4 months now) I figured it was normal. but it's starting to worry me. should I be worried about things like CTS? (carpal tunnel syndrome) It feels like its just the muscles on my forearm burning a bit. I get it after practicing pentatonic scales. I'm working on increasing the speed. I do warm ups before i start since I'm getting up to a decent speed now. I started taking 20 minute breaks after every hour because I tend to play 3 or more hours a day.
#12
One of the symptoms of CTS - the early stages - thankfully I don't know what the later stages feel like and don't intend to find out - is a feeling of an occasional jolt, like a mild electric shock in your wrist or forearm while you are playing. A few years ago that was happening to me fairly often, and the CTS thing was confirmed by a masseuse that came around work when he checked my arm and wrist out. Here are the things I incorporated into my practice as a result of his suggestions. I've been free of CTS symptoms for a good 18 months as a result.

1) Stretch before you play and also massage the muscles. Don't just focus on the obvious areas like fingers, wrist, forearm. A lot of the tension comes from higher up - neck, shoulders, upper back, and gets transmitted down. So focus on getting those areas loosened up too. Give this a good 5 mins before you pick up the guitar. No exceptions.
2) After stretching, give it a good, gradual warm up on the guitar to get the fingers moving. Don't play anything fast, or difficult during this time.
3) Take breaks. My formula is 25-30 mins on, 10 mins off, and it's been working well. This is also very good for your focus, as it's hard to stay completely focused for longer periods.
4) Take mini-breaks - 15 seconds where you'll stop and stretch your muscles.
5) Watch the tension in your playing. Super important. The tricky thing is that we get used to playing with tension, so it starts feeling normal and we don't notice it. Really pay attention to what your body is doing and ask yourself if you are really relaxed. Since it can be hard to notice, it's useful to have a checklist of body parts to pay attention to for signs of tension. For example, are you raising your picking hand shoulder towards your ear? Are you gripping the neck too tight? If you pick with an open hand, are your unused fingers hanging loosely, or rigid? If you use a closed hand picking technique, is it too much like a tight fist?
#13
sometimes i get pains just from learning something im not used to, it goes when i get used to it

and i put my thumb behind the neck. ive tryed not doing it but i go back to doing it without realising...besides, it works for me and thats really what counts


i always get electric shocks of the strings...proper ones...i can phiscaly see the blue thunderlike stuff from the strings to my fingers =D
its proper cool, makes me feel like god of thunder, or god of shred
#14
Honestly, no tention at all. while playing the guitar I could say that I'm completely relaxed. But I will stretch and warm up before hand. I don't feel any "jolts" though. Just a warm burning feeling, like when you get a fever, in my arm. No real pain. It just feels strange x'D
#15
Thanks Freepower.
I think your explenation is probably correct for my situation. Took 2 days off and feeling no pain.Ill hit the strings tonight and see how it feels.
No I dont have a teacher.
Been working on ufo and schenker songs for a year or so now.