#1
how come when most strat's necks' age alot(like on a road-worn strat), the wood get's worn down, and becomes lighter than the (presumably) tanned maple neck, and on Eric clapton's brownie strat, the aging marks on the frettboard look like they've been burnt

how would this happen???

Road Worn Strat:


Eric Clapton's Brownie Strat:
#2
I've noticed this on Blackie, and any other strat that EC has torn up the frettboard, and it only seems to happen on his guitars
#3
when you press down on the strings they abrade against the fretbord. over time the abraision becomes noticable and then ends up like Clapton's guitar lol

ignore my bad spelling
#5
no, but the grease and oils from you finger combined with the worn down finish from the strings will


which is why the "road worn" strats will never look as good as an old naturally worn strat
Gear:
2003 Fender Standard Strat w/ Texas Specials
2010 EBMM BFR JP6
2012 Babicz Identity Dreadnaught
2015 Gibson Les Paul Traditional SR
Line 6 POD HD500
Peavey XXX 112
Fender Blues Jr
#6
Quote by Musicman48858
no, but the grease and oils from you finger combined with the worn down finish from the strings will


which is why the "road worn" strats will never look as good as an old naturally worn strat


That, my maple fretboard on my Dellinger is starting to show dirt real bad. It's actually quite nice to know where my fingers mainly been concentrating but really it looks too dirty.
#7
how does the frettboard get to that golden-yellow hue, as I'm sure all 57 strat's necks were pale white when they were new, just like any other new guitar with a maple neck.
#8
Those worn spots on the fretboards of Road Worn Fenders will eventually darken from dirt and oils rubbed in through hours of playing. They will look more like relics as a result.

The golden color on the necks comes from the lacquer aging. A number of makers offer a tinted lacquer that replicates that aged look on new maple necks.