#1
I've learned many songs in my life of a guitarist and some of them had chords like thses:

D-4 or D-6
A-5....A-7
E-2....E-4

From what I know these chords have a root, 5#, and an octave.. Whatare they called?
#2
Minor 7th?
You can call me Aaron.


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#4
Augmented fifth. The key interval in this case is that of the root and #5, which is a raised fifth distance (a semitone more than a perfect fifth, or power chord). The interval between the #5 and octave is that of a major third, which is effectively the inversion of an aug5.

To the above, there is no minor 7th in either of those, regardless of any inversions or whatnot they could be played in. A minor seventh generally consists of the root, a minor third, perfect fifth, and minor seventh (par exceptions where the fifth is omitted .etc.)
For example, this could be considered a minor seventh:

E-x
B-7 (F#, V)
G-7 (D, bIII)
D-7 (A, bVII)
A-x
E-7 (B, I)

Or in another form, this:

E-x
B-7 (F#, V)
G-x
D-7 (A, bVII)
A-5 (D, bIII)
E-7 (B, I)

It doesn't necessarily matter where the notes are (these are just inversions, or alternative voicings, but may have different names .eg. Bm7/F#, suggesting the 5th in base), so long as they're there.
Last edited by juckfush at Dec 19, 2009,
#6
Augmented 5th. And technically speaking, its an interval (dyad), not a chord, because a chord tends to have 3 different notes or more, such as a triad (R 3 5) or a maj7 (R 3 5 7)
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#7
Quote by kenvy
Ohhhh...Ok thanks..


I actually don't know if that's right at all...

To the above, there is no minor 7th in either of those, regardless of any inversions or whatnot they could be played in. A minor seventh generally consists of the root, a minor third, perfect fifth, and minor seventh (par exceptions where the fifth is omitted .etc.)
For example, this could be considered a minor seventh:

Oh, Ok... I just googled "sharp the 5th", and it gave me that...

TS, I'm wrong. It's it's not what I said.
You can call me Aaron.


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Out on parole, any more instances of plum text and I get put back in...
Last edited by biga29 at Dec 19, 2009,
#8
Quote by biga29
I actually don't know if that's right at all...

Oh, Ok... I just googled "sharp the 5th", and it gave me that...

TS, I'm wrong. It's it's not what I said.

Not a problem Sorry if I came off as arrogant at all in my reply, I sort of entered elitist mode for a second there.
#10
Quote by MLilienthal
Minor 7th is 1 3 5 7 of a minor scale


Or 1 b3 5 b7 of a major scale :P
Quote by santa_man99
THANK you. I love you forever.


Quote by DrFuzz
Why are you researching for Christmas? It's only Ma- HOLY CRAP WHERE'S 2009 GONE!?!?!?


Quote by ilikepirates
You're right, that is weird. You win.