#1
I'll cut to the chase.

Keep in mind I'm right handed.

My friend has always told me that it is really bad if you have your left hand thumb pushing against the back of the neck when you play. I have always tried to do as he says and have my thumb resting against the side of the neck or even have it hanging on the fret board at times, but I always run into the same problem...

When I try to play certain chords such as:

e-------------------------------
B-------------------------------
G-------------------------------
D--1--3------------------------
A--1--3------------------------
E--1----------------------------

I can not play chords like that without having my thumb press the back of the neck. If I don't let my thumb push on the back of the neck then my index, and ring fingers simply cannot reach the frets...I don't know if my hand is too small or what. I'm seventeen if that helps with anything. If anyone knows what my problem is let me know.

Also now that it comes to mind how do you go about naming power chords? I realized this when I tabbed the above chord. I might be wrong but would the above chord be referred to as an A chord?

Thanks for reading,

Aaron
"The mind is everything. What you think, you become."
#2
Actually, your friend's got it the wrong way round. The ideal technique puts the thumb on the back of the neck unless it's necessary to move it to gain leverage for a bend etc.

Powerchords are called "5 chords", eg. A5.
Last edited by blue_strat at Dec 19, 2009,
#3
Oh really?

Well in that case which direction should my thumb be pointing on the back of the neck?
I heard something about pointing it at the head stock, but I point it...I guess you could say I point it parallel with the frets...if that makes any sense, sorry it's kinda hard for me to verbally explain.


Could anyone also answer my second question above?
"The mind is everything. What you think, you become."
Last edited by mardisaaron at Dec 19, 2009,
#4
Quote by blue_strat
Actually, your friend's got it the wrong way round. The ideal technique puts the thumb on the back of the neck unless it's necessary to move it to gain leverage for a bend etc.



Yeah, your friend is mistaken...
#5
Quote by mardisaaron
Well in that case which direction should my thumb be pointing on the back of the neck?
I heard something about pointing it at the head stock, but I point it...I guess you could say I point it parallel with the frets...if that makes any sense, sorry it's kinda hard for me to verbally explain.

Whichever feels most comfortable, which is probably more parallel to the frets.
#6
Quote by blue_strat
Actually, your friend's got it the wrong way round. The ideal technique puts the thumb on the back of the neck unless it's necessary to move it to gain leverage for a bend etc.

Powerchords are called "5 chords", eg. A5.


This man got it right.
1. You're surfing the internet.
2. You're browsing through the UG forums.
3. You're reading now.
5. You didn't notice that there was no #4.
6. You just checked it.
7. Now you're having a lil smile.

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#7
Quote by Kozlic
This man got it right.



Ok thankyou everyone,

so then this:

--------------------------
--------------------------
--------------------------
---2--4------------------
---2--4------------------
---2----------------------

would be called A#5?
because it's a non-natural you need the sharp notation?
"The mind is everything. What you think, you become."
#8
Quote by mardisaaron
Ok thankyou everyone,

so then this:

--------------------------
--------------------------
--------------------------
---2--4------------------
---2--4------------------
---2----------------------

would be called A#5?
because it's a non-natural you need the sharp notation?

You've got two chords there; a triad and a dyad.

The first could be F#7sus4 with no 5th. The second could be a fourth built on C#, or an inverted F#5.
#9
oh god i'm lost...any advice on where to learn more? A sticky/post you could sugest?
"The mind is everything. What you think, you become."
#11
Quote by mardisaaron
oh god i'm lost...any advice on where to learn more? A sticky/post you could sugest?

this would be the power chord F#5.
---------
------------
----------
--4--------
--4--------
--2---------


---------
----------
----------
--2--4---
--2--4--
--2-------
but this (the way you put it) would mean that you first play those three strings all from the second fret, and after that, the second and third string both from 4th fret. Chord means multiple notes played SIMULTANEOUSLY, so this would not be a chord.
#12
Quote by asdaas
this would be the power chord A#5.
---------
------------
----------
--4--------
--4--------
--2---------

In standard tuning that would be F#5.

These are all A#5:
e|--------6------|
B|--------6--11--|
G|--3-----3--10--|
D|--3--8------8--|
A|--1--8---------|
E|-----6---------|
Last edited by blue_strat at Dec 19, 2009,
#13
Quote by blue_strat
In standard tuning that would be F#5.

These are all A#5:
e|--------6------|
B|--------6--11--|
G|--3-----3--10--|
D|--3--8------8--|
A|--1--8---------|
E|-----6---------|

Yeah sorry i already fixed it.
#14
oh ok I see now
thank you everyone for your time
"The mind is everything. What you think, you become."
#15
Quote by blue_strat

These are all A#5:

e|--------6-------------------13--|
B|--------6--11------------6--11--|
G|--3-----3--10--------10--3------|
D|--3--8------8-----3---8---------|
A|--1--8---------8--1-------------|
E|-----6---------6----------------|


I added some diads. I know they're not technically chords, but they are still considered power chords. You don't need the octave.


Quote by mardisaaron
oh ok I see now
thank you everyone for your time

No problem. That what we're here for.
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Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
Last edited by Junior#1 at Dec 20, 2009,