#1
Im 15 and I picked up the guitar last year in December, I have come a long way to where I am now. I can play decently, as long as it doesn't require lots of crazy techniques like Hammer ons and pull offs. I struggle with the pull offs..but what I was wondering is if you guys have any advice for a beginner guitarist teaching themselves.

Also, if you practice scales and chords and all of the music theory stuff is it going to improve my playing as far as technique goes?
Aspiring guitarist, looking for all of the info I can get.
#2
Quote by Sixxi94ESP
Im 15 and I picked up the guitar last year in December, I have come a long way to where I am now. I can play decently, as long as it doesn't require lots of crazy techniques like Hammer ons and pull offs. I struggle with the pull offs..but what I was wondering is if you guys have any advice for a beginner guitarist teaching themselves.


A qualified teacher is definitely helpful. If you can't just practice well on your own. When working on technique, take it down really slow, and play it perfectly at that tempo, and then work on playing faster. Practice for good technique, and speed will naturally develop. If you practice for speed you'll end up playing sloppy (albeit fast). Learn some basic music theory (crusades articles on this site are a good place to start). Its good to know some thoery, but if you don't like it, don't feel its absolutely necessary. It will help you play, but that doesn't mean you can't be good without theory. Its just harder to be good without theory than with theory.

Quote by Sixxi94ESP
Also, if you practice scales and chords and all of the music theory stuff is it going to improve my playing as far as technique goes?


Any actual playing of the guitar will help your muscle memory. If you play with good technique, your muscles'll learn good technique. If you play with bad technique, your muscles'll learn bad technique. So, if you practice playing scales, and you practice them with good technique, it will help your technique. However, if you just play your scales as fast as possible, it will probably give you worse technique.

Theory will not help your technique. Theory is a language for musicians to remember musical things, and describe them, quantitatively. It helps playing with other musicians, learn songs (with anything other than tab), and writing songs, primarily. Since it doesn't involve any actual playing on the guitar, it won't affect your playing technique positively or negatively.
#3
Theory is important, though. It will make playing easier because you will know what sdounds good before you play something. mprovising is based on knowledge of the notes and how they sound together. Also, if you want to write music, it is generally easier once you know a bit of theory.
#4
Quote by Sixxi94ESP
Im 15 and I picked up the guitar last year in December, I have come a long way to where I am now. I can play decently, as long as it doesn't require lots of crazy techniques like Hammer ons and pull offs. I struggle with the pull offs..but what I was wondering is if you guys have any advice for a beginner guitarist teaching themselves.

Also, if you practice scales and chords and all of the music theory stuff is it going to improve my playing as far as technique goes?



Using a metronome will help technique when you practice. Theory will help knowledge of what you can play. Think of it this way: Look at your guitar neck. How much of it do you REALLY understand, as far as whats going on with the neck if you were just to start playing? For many the neck is mostly a mystery and they find the places that are safe and play themselves into boredom or a rut.

Theory when applied to the guitar makes the neck much less of a mystery and makes things like which chords can I play, easier to answer.

Shouldn't one understand the instrument they play?
#5
Hey dude

Yea you're going to learn a lot faster if you get help from a tutor. As far as technique goes only someone who knows what they're doing can show you what you're doing wrong. If you've been going for 3 years then good on you for keepin it up.

Scales, chords and theory are helpful. If you understand how everything works you'll find it a lot easier. If your learning on your own steam I wouldn't worry too much as long as you do cover them. Have a go at songs and build your abilities that way. You can pick up good technique from watching your favourite guitarist play. The key is to play something that pushes your abilities.