#1
yesterday in class, our teacher asked us this question. "Why is it important to know about the author?" What do you guys think?
#3
Like the style of his writing or his biography? I don't think it's that important anyway but obviously knowing about him means nothing to english.
Blog Of Awesome UGers.
Quote by OddOneOut
I seem to attract girls.
Which is annoying, cos I'm a girl and I like cock.

Quote by IRISH_PUNK13
Being an idiot should be illegal too.
#4
To know his/her personal perspective or opinion on the subject matter of their books; which may have influenced the slant and/or content.
#6
It makes the piece of work relevant to the world - everything that is written is sparked or inspired by something, whether intentional or not. Writing is often the most vulnerable and intense scope into a person's head. Knowing what environment it came from gives us a higher understanding of humankind.
Quote by Arthur Curry
it's official, vintage x metal is the saving grace of this board and/or the antichrist




e-married to
theguitarist
minterman22
tateandlyle
& alaskan_ninja

#7
It's not necessarily. It allows you to form judgements on a book based not on the contents of the book but on the author's biography. This may or may not be helpful depending on a whole host of things.
#8
Quote by Holy Katana
It might provide insight into the author's literature. It depends if he or she writes personal stories.


Everything written is a personal story one way or another, even if not intended to be.
Due what you want as long as you vote Due!
#9
If you understand the pretext, and authors influences, it makes it easier to make logical conclusions as to the meaning of a story.

Remember: In writing there is no such thing as coincidence, only intent.
Quote by JacobTheMe
JacobTheEdit: Hell yeah Ruben.

Quote by Jackal58
I met Jesus once. Cocksucker still owes me 20 bucks.
#10
Quote by diofan88
If you understand the pretext, and authors influences, it makes it easier to make logical conclusions as to the meaning of a story.

Remember: In writing there is no such thing as coincidence, only intent.

And in literary criticism, intent is meaningless.
#11
It makes it easier to find them and burn down their house after they write the Twilight Saga
Gear
Highway One Tele (w/Custom Shop 51 Nocaster pickups)
Standard Tele (modded to Nashville specs)
Reverend Roundhouse

Orange Rockerverb 50 MKI
Vox AC4c1
Jet City JCA20H

And pedals!



"Shiva opens her arms now..
...to make sure I don't get too far"
#13
Quote by Holy Katana
And in literary criticism, intent is meaningless.

+1 I think it's sometimes better not to know about the author, because it can keep you from being entirely objective when reading the text.
I think we took too many drugs when we were kids,
'cause now we like to make
Weird Music
-Wayne Coyne
#14
Quote by LSC300
yesterday in class, our teacher asked us this question. "Why is it important to know about the author?" What do you guys think?

It can lead you to ask why their expressing views.

However, it's just more interesting. There's a fantasy writer who I enjoy called Robert Jordan, and the man was actually a 'nam vet. When it came to physical conflict, he used to say how he tried to make it as realistic as possible because he knew what it's like first hand to shoot or to be shot at.
#16
Reader-response criticism has nothing to do with authorial intent.

Quote by Craigo
It can lead you to ask why their expressing views.

However, it's just more interesting. There's a fantasy writer who I enjoy called Robert Jordan, and the man was actually a 'nam vet. When it came to physical conflict, he used to say how he tried to make it as realistic as possible because he knew what it's like first hand to shoot or to be shot at.

Isn't Robert Jordan's entire technique for describing conflicting just listing the names of swordfighting moves?
#17
Quote by diofan88
Remember: In writing there is no such thing as coincidence, only intent.

I've actually got a number of short stories written by me under my belt which were written to not express any views or meanings. I intentionally left them wide open.
#18
Quote by SmarterChild
Isn't Robert Jordan's entire technique for describing conflicting just listing the names of swordfighting moves?

No. Most of the time when he does that he does it to show technique. For example he may use it to describe a sword practice, or 'play' fight. He does do that in actual conflict, but not very often at all. Sanderson, who took over finishing his works, his liable to do that far more often and it's something I didn't like about the most recent novel although it's brilliant.

EDIT: Reader-response criticism is something I posted with the article on The Name of the Rose. It was just to complement it, I didn't say anything to do with intent.
Last edited by Craigo at Dec 19, 2009,