#1
Hi guys,

I'm new here. I had a look and i cant find the answer to this question so i thought i would ask it!

I have been playing in DADGad tuning for a few years now, but having difficulties keeping the guitar in tune in-between songs!

I have a Takamine D series acoustic with gauge 12 D'addario EJ16 Light 12-53 steel strings on it.

I only put the strings on a few days ago, i have stretched the strings several times and tune and re-tune it regularly using a digital tuner.

My problem is that it wont stay in tune! it keeps going flat and sounding terrible.

I play in DADGad with no capo, then capo on 2nd fret, 3rd, 5th etc. even when i change from no capo to capo 2nd or any fret, it mucks around with the tuning and i need to retune it again, very frustrating! I have a decent capo as well, one of those solid "Kyser" quick change KG6B

Can you recommend anything i can do to fix it? better/thicker strings? or a different method of re-stringing my guitar in the first place?

Any help will be greatly appreciated!

Has anyone else had a similar problem?

Steve
#2
You could always get a locking tuner.
Quote by aldo47
(i thought hot strings would make me finger faster.)
so i tried to set my strings on fire by putting a lighter on the high e string n it cut it so wtf??!!? i passed the lighter rrly slowly by it for less then a sec n then it snapped...
#3
you mean locking nut...or at least head, not tuner because there is no such thing

and try getting thicker strings. thicker strings are better for lower tunings. dont get them to thick though, its only a step down
#4
Locking tuners, definitely. Plus a graphite nut and maybe bridge. I'm pretty sure I've seen a pack of all three somewhere for acoustics...

EDIT:

Quote by link no1
you mean locking nut...or at least head, not tuner because there is no such thing

Actually, they are called tuners. The things you turn? Yeah.

And by the way, a locking nut on a non-FR style guitar will not work, as the bridge lacks the fine tuners to put the guitar back into tune after the locking nut has been tightened. And then again, I've never heard of a FR on an acoustic.
Last edited by NakedInTheRain at Dec 19, 2009,
#5
Your guitar will always need slight readjusting when you put a capo on if you don't put it on really carefully making sure you don't bend any of the strings which would send them sharp-
#6
Kyser capos are known for pulling strings sharp. Get a Shubb or a G7th.

Also, a graphite nut and saddle will help. Locking tuners aren't necessary, but it would be a good idea to upgrade from the stock tuners. Gotoh 510's (with a 1:21 ratio) are a good choice.
Quote by Ur all $h1t
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#7
Thanks for the quick reply and advice guys, i think i will try slightly thicker strings.

I've had Elixer strings on a couple of times. do you guys recommend them? or any other brand better than D'addario. Also i only put a little of the string round the tuning peg when i am restringing the guitar, do i need to put much more string round the peg?

Also i snip the string ends off with pliers after restringing, that's a good idea right?

Thanks

Steve
#8
Quote by keanzy
Thanks for the quick reply and advice guys, i think i will try slightly thicker strings.

I've had Elixer strings on a couple of times. do you guys recommend them? or any other brand better than D'addario. Also i only put a little of the string round the tuning peg when i am restringing the guitar, do i need to put much more string round the peg?

Also i snip the string ends off with pliers after restringing, that's a good idea right? No problem here. Or you could coil them into little loops.

Thanks

Steve


I'm guessing this is the root of all your troubles, not the need to switch to a thicker gauge string. DADGAD is only a step below standard for half the strings, so the tension on all of the strings will be close to that of standard tuning.
Look at how you are stringing up the guitar at the tuning machines. You should have 2-3 wraps below the hole, and 1 wrap above. The first wrap should go over the string as it exits the hole, then you continue to wind up the tuner, making 2-3 wraps below. This locks the string into place preventing slipping. When I can find the right tutorial that I use(which is flawless BTW, and has never failed me in my considerable time of guitaring), I'll post it here for you to follow. It takes a few times of it to get it down pat, and having a string winder handy helps a lot, but you can certainly manage without one.
#9
There is a law of physics somewhere that says any winch / winding device etc (read tuners) if 2 turns are put around it, it will lock, less than 2 turns & you have a slipping winch (which has applications as well just not in guitar)

Im with leftyDAVE.

Though i just wrap 2 turns on big 'wound' strings & 3 turns on unwound strings.
& as Dave says they must be wound in the downward direction however i do this by winding 2 turns in the upward direction & then putting the end through. I.E. i get the string pull it up to the tuner then wrap upwards (away from the centreline of the guitar) then put the end through & pull it. A few turns & it is done.

I'll try to paste a pic later
Richard

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#10
I always just stick the string through the tuner and tune it up while holding the end of the string. It never fails. I just cut the string afterward.
Quote by Ur all $h1t
On public transport I furiously masturbate while trying to make eye contact with as many people as possible for as long as possible.