#1
So me and the other guitarist in my band have some kind of cheap rigs but i have a curiosity question.

He plays a Behringer V-Ampire (that I have always hated because it sounds muddy) and he plays it through a 4x12 cab with a little 20 watt amp hooked in from a speaker output on his head. This makes his sound as clear as he can possibly get because the treble comes from this little amp. It has actually made it sound a lot better.

I have a Crate XT120. I play with a digitech metal master and i like my tone well enough not to have to spend a ton to upgrade yet. Out of curiosity I wanted to attach a 20 watt amp as well but if i plug anything into the speaker output on my Crate, it shuts off the speaker making it a head instead of a combo amp. Short of an AB switch, what can I do to try this out using the features on my amp? Is there a way designed in the Crate amps to do this or do I need to rig something?

I'm just curious, this isn't life or death. But I'm just wondering. Thanks for your help.
#2
Wait.. What?

So his setup goes:
Behringer speaker out --> 20 watt amp input --> 20 watt amp speaker out --> 4x12?
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#3
no.
his behringer has two speaker outs and each one goes to a different amp. he doesn't have them all in line.
my amp is a combo amp so its automatically going to my speaker but i also have a speaker out as well it just turns off my speaker when it is used.
#4
I'm sorry, but that's ****ing ridiculous.

I know tone is subjective and all, but just sounds to me like your ears aren't developed enough to hear the difference...

Anyway for what you've described, buy a bloody 5-band EQ instead of looking like a nimrod with a cheapo combo balanced on top of your amp.
#5
i'm aware that it looks retarded. the fact is that his amp sounded terrible ( it sounded like it was in another room) and now it actually sounds a lot better. i may not have the most developed ears ever but it did sound a lot better. this question is not because i want to do the same to sound better. this question is because i want to see if my amp is even capable of such a venture. i wondered if anyone knew how this would work here but it looks like no one does so they resort to attacking my ears instead of realizing that this is not a completely serious question just a mere curiosity. if i learned how and had a show the next day, you'd better bet that i would not play the show with that practice amp up on top of my rig.

does someone actually know or should i just forget it?
#6
ok. i just solved the riddle. my digitech metal master has two outputs- amp and mixer. i take one to the Crate amp and the other to the 20 watt. for some reason it doesn't get any quieter on either signal to have it split. i still don't know how to do it with the amp but i got it to work without buying new crap.
honestly it doesn't sound any better at all. i can do some interesting effects where one half gets the effect and the other plays completely clean and they are mixed but tonewise it sucks.
anyway i got it.
thanks for the awesome help. (buy a 5-band eq!)
#7
Quote by zzzzzzzzzzzzz
ok. i just solved the riddle. my digitech metal master has two outputs- amp and mixer. i take one to the Crate amp and the other to the 20 watt. for some reason it doesn't get any quieter on either signal to have it split. i still don't know how to do it with the amp but i got it to work without buying new crap.
honestly it doesn't sound any better at all. i can do some interesting effects where one half gets the effect and the other plays completely clean and they are mixed but tonewise it sucks.
anyway i got it.
thanks for the awesome help. (buy a 5-band eq!)

Glad you gave it a try. Half the fun of guitar is experimenting and doing things you aren't necessarily supposed to do.
Hell, overdrive is technically an 'unwanted phenomeneon'.

If you're having problems with clarity, an EQ pedal is indeed a quick effective solution (though it's never going to be as good as working out why your rig is muddy in the first place).
#8
Quote by kyle62
If you're having problems with clarity, an EQ pedal is indeed a quick effective solution (though it's never going to be as good as working out why your rig is muddy in the first place).


+1

Muddiness can be distilled into a few reasons:
1. Inappropriate amp for your music styles
2. Bad EQing
3. Too much gain. (you don't need to dime your gain to 11 to bring the brootalz)
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