#1
so i'm at a crossroads, so to speak (no pun intended)

i've been playing guitar for about 10 years. i am completely self taught and play by ear. i have perfect pitch (meaning i can identify any note by hearing it, and sing any note on command).

the point is, i feel like i want to further explore learning the guitar. i am wondering if anyone knows how i might be able to teach myself more about guitar playing and music theory.

in short, i have a good grasp on music, but want to be able to improvise stuff like blues solos and really know what i'm doing

short of lessons, any suggestions?
i jazzmasters
#2
I learned a lot of my theory from these Satriani and Vai columns on theory that were in Guitar World in the early 00's. If you can find them any where, they're pretty good about presenting the theory, and then providing examples of the concept, and then how it works and sounds.
Quote by bearded_monkey
Everytime I go into the guitar shop and ask for a G-String the shopkeeper always makes that TERRIBLE joke about it not being an underwear shop

So next time I go in I'm gonna ask for a thong
#3
Quote by loveoffsets
so i'm at a crossroads, so to speak (no pun intended)

i've been playing guitar for about 10 years. i am completely self taught and play by ear. i have perfect pitch (meaning i can identify any note by hearing it, and sing any note on command).

the point is, i feel like i want to further explore learning the guitar. i am wondering if anyone knows how i might be able to teach myself more about guitar playing and music theory.

in short, i have a good grasp on music, but want to be able to improvise stuff like blues solos and really know what i'm doing

short of lessons, any suggestions?


I'm self taught also - 25 years now.

Having a good ear is a huge asset, without a doubt. When it comes to improvising, which is my favorite way to play, I use my ear constantly to tell me whether it wants to go high or low. Have you ever considered some jam background tracks, and take something as simple as a pentatonic blues with a b5 and adding an altered ninth to suggest some interesting ideas. I like Robben Ford's approach to the blues with his jazz flavor to it. Tasty stuff. You can pick out your favorite players and figure out the notes they are playing and then step back, map the chords out, look at the notes over the chords, and see what sounds cool.

Hope that helps man. Kudos!
#4
Quote by loveoffsets
so i'm at a crossroads, so to speak (no pun intended)

i've been playing guitar for about 10 years. i am completely self taught and play by ear. i have perfect pitch (meaning i can identify any note by hearing it, and sing any note on command).

the point is, i feel like i want to further explore learning the guitar. i am wondering if anyone knows how i might be able to teach myself more about guitar playing and music theory.

in short, i have a good grasp on music, but want to be able to improvise stuff like blues solos and really know what i'm doing

short of lessons, any suggestions?


you can try this checklist :

you and your instrument
technique/ posture

you and the music
aural skills theory

you and the audience
communicating , performing
improvising ( the ability to change with empathy to the music you hear )
#5
Quote by Sean0913
I'm self taught also - 25 years now.

Having a good ear is a huge asset, without a doubt. When it comes to improvising, which is my favorite way to play, I use my ear constantly to tell me whether it wants to go high or low. Have you ever considered some jam background tracks, and take something as simple as a pentatonic blues with a b5 and adding an altered ninth to suggest some interesting ideas. I like Robben Ford's approach to the blues with his jazz flavor to it. Tasty stuff. You can pick out your favorite players and figure out the notes they are playing and then step back, map the chords out, look at the notes over the chords, and see what sounds cool.

Hope that helps man. Kudos!




And to Loveoffsets, have you learned and memorized the notes on the fretboard?

Doing so is a great way to always have an idea of which notes you can play and when. Along with your perfect pitch, you should be well on your way to improvising all over the neck with barely any effort.

One exercise I did to help me learn the notes was to get out your metronome and set it to about 40 bpm.

Now pick a note and every click hit that note. Lets start with A

At the first click you would play the 5th fret on the E string and then at the second click you would play the 17th fret.
Continue on to the next string (A). (open string, 12th fret)
You get where I'm going with this?

Gradually, speed up until you can find the notes almost instantly.

Now knowing the notes will make it a ton easier to apply scales onto the fret board and make it a ton easier to improvise over a backing track.