#1
Hey everyone, let me first tell you a little about my circumstance, before asking my question.
I am new to this forum and searched for a similar topic, but couldn't find one (so please don't flame me!).
I am a relativley new to playing bass (been playing since June 2009) and decided I wouldn't join a band until I'd been playing for about 12months, giving me ample time to learn the basics of theory, techniques etc as well as giving me time to gain confidence in my playing.
However, 4 months in, a few close friends asked me to play bass in the band. I accepted but for 8 weeks of rehersals now, I have been unable to hear my bass, and whenever I can I am told it is too loud and I need to turn it down.
We play hard rock and heavy metal. At the moment, playing covers like Metallica, Avenged Sevenfold or Shinedown.

So I need help, how loud, relative to the guitars (we use an acoustic drum set so that volume can't be changed) should my bass be?
Or how can we find the optimum volumes for our band, is there any "secret" technique or anything?


Thankyou in advance,
Josh
#3
it's got a lot to do with EQ.. maybe try boosting your mids a bit or turning the guitarist's bass down.
#4
uhh go to your amp and turn up the mid,

ooorrrrrrr,

if theres only one guitarist, you could kill the mid and turn up the bass and treble,
then your bass fill sound real funky, like dude from korn, have your tone nob up full too XD

you can do a lot with the nobs on your amp, adjusting them will probably help find a nice balance in the band where everything is pleasantly audable
Quote by Nor'Easterbass
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#5
Quote by alucardmik
if theres only one guitarist, you could kill the mid and turn up the bass and treble,
then your bass fill sound real funky, like dude from korn, have your tone nob up full too XD

you can do a lot with the nobs on your amp, adjusting them will probably help find a nice balance in the band where everything is pleasantly audable

Wtf are the schools teaching nowadays?

Anyway, TS, you should be able to hear yourself as well as you can hear them. One thing though: Is your amp on the floor, and are you standing next to it? If the speakers are firing at your legs, then you're probably not hearing the full volume, while everyone else is.
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#6
In my band i'm always asking my brother (the bass player) to turn up his amp louder.
I like to hear the bass almost like a 3rd guitar. He also uses a tight distortion, which makes his bass even more audible.
He also puts his bass amp on top of a tall chair (Mutant_Corn is right).

But we play sort of a instrumental progressive post-metal (like a miscellanea of Pelican, Mastodon and Opeth), so it may contribute to the enormous presence of the bass.

Either way, you should balance the sound so that everyone can hear both himself and the others. If you really can't hear yourself at all, you should turn the volume up and tell the others to stop being assholes.
But, as Mutant_Corn said, it's normal to hear more the others than yourself if you're standing right next to your amp. Try different amp positions (for both the guitars and bass).
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#7
Ahhh dude you do realize your playing bass?
Unfortunately most of the times bass players are really never there to be a lower octave lead guitar player but just to give the whole sound of the band sound more full.

What im trying to say is that the bass player is not supposed to stand out but be noticed when missing.
#8
Quote by scaronyourface
Ahhh dude you do realize your playing bass?
Unfortunately most of the times bass players are really never there to be a lower octave lead guitar player but just to give the whole sound of the band sound more full.

What im trying to say is that the bass player is not supposed to stand out but be noticed when missing.


Wrong. The bassist can do whatever the hell they want.

TS, I would advise cutting your high mids and treble a bit, and turn your volume up a little. This should get you a deep, smooth sound that is audible but doesn't intefere with the guitars. Also get your guitards to cut their lows, it actually makes them sound more br00t4lz as well as giving you a bit more space.

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Last edited by m4l666 at Dec 22, 2009,
#9
Quote by m4l666
Wrong. The bassist can do whatever the hell they want.

TS, I would advise cutting your high mids and treble a bit, and turn your volume up a little. This should get you a deep, smooth sound that is audible but doesn't intefere with the guitars. Also get your guitards to cut their lows, it actually makes them sound more br00t4lz as well as giving you a bit more space.


Wrong, the bassist does what the music needs, and not whatever the hell he/she wants.

What amp do you have first? If its very small an upgrade may be needed. Raise to ear height of everyone or chest but take it up from their feet. Also tilting it back can help.So the sound travels towards your ears. Coupling it with something might also help, Maybe putting it in a box might make it louder.

Leave the bass knob upwards, and then push the mids and treble.
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#10
Thanks everyone for the responses so far. Has helped a lot.
Just for the record, I'm using a 100W Mesa Boogie amp (not mine provided by the rehersal space the guys have hired out), and it was on the floor, I was also standing across the room from it, (we use an inverted live set up, i.e. all Amps in line with e drums and us at the other side of the room facing the drumkit, playing).

But I think what I've been doing wrong is not using enough mids (I've just read the FAQ to figure all that out) and the fact that it was low down.
Oh and my bandmates are nobs anyway :p

Cheers
#11
tell them you just can't hear yourself and that either they turn down or you turn up thier choice if they still give you shit pitch a fit and drive home all madona like.

there really is not too loud for bass srrsly i rin 1400watts into my 8x10 and crank it up all the time and evryone can stil hear themselves jsut fine and we rock the **** out.

maybe yor guitarist's settings are wrong not yours i remember one time i was jamming with a guy and his guitar sounded like ass and he couldent hear himself me and him adjusted some settings on his amp(did not adjust volume) and evrything went smoothly after that if your guitarists are cutting all thier mids and are sounding very shrill then they wont be able to hear themselves very good. so maybe its not you it's them probably is them too when is that last time you ever heard of a bassist ruining the sound?>
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#12
Emergency Exit, the Madonna style fit has already been thrown at last practice, but yeah I'm gonna suggest a lot of what has been posted in this thread, and getting them to sort there EQ out as well as mine seems like a good idea.

Thank again, and again I'm sorry for my noobyness, I'll learn though!
#13
In my band we always match the bass with the drums, volume-wise, at the beginning of the rehearsel. That way, the only instruments that can be too loud are the guitars and they can never tell me I'm too loud, 'cause I'm just as loud as the drummer is
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