#1
I recently began writing out all scales (Cmaj/min-Bmaj/min) and noticed a problem using the circle of fifths and fourths. I can't find any solution to working out the keys of Fb minor, Gb minor, Cb minor, D# major, E# minor, F# minor and B# minor.

I know these scales would never be used and are relatively useless but I consider myself somewhat stubborn in knowing this kind of thing. The only thing I can find on any of them is that Gb minor would have 6 flats and 2 double flats but other than that I am lost. I know there are harmonic equivalents but they are NOT the same as actual keys as I have discovered with some different scales.

Any help satisfying my curiosity would be appreciated
Quote by fleajr_1412
You have amazing taste in men.


Are You a PROG-HEAD? I am.
#2
B# minor would be B#m Cx° D# E#m Fxm G# and A#, which might make theoretical sense to a composer, but would probably get a music stand thrown at him by anyone who had to perform it.

edited double sharp symbol to x
Last edited by blue_strat at Dec 22, 2009,
#3
I know it's not exactly a viable key, I'd just quite like to know. Some of the symbols you used in your post aren't showing up though
Quote by fleajr_1412
You have amazing taste in men.


Are You a PROG-HEAD? I am.
#4
Quote by Dopey_Trout
I recently began writing out all scales (Cmaj/min-Bmaj/min) and noticed a problem using the circle of fifths and fourths. I can't find any solution to working out the keys of Fb minor, Gb minor, Cb minor, D# major, E# minor, F# minor and B# minor.

I know these scales would never be used and are relatively useless but I consider myself somewhat stubborn in knowing this kind of thing...


They're in there, if you dig far enough. The circle of fifths isn't a circle at all; it's a spiral which has been obscured by circular temperament.

Fbb Cbb Gbb Dbb Abb Ebb Bbb Fb Cb Gb Db Ab Eb Bb F

There's your Fb minor.


Fbb Cbb Gbb Dbb Abb Ebb Bbb Fb Cb Gb Db Ab Eb Bb F

Gb minor


Fbb Cbb Gbb Dbb Abb Ebb Bbb Fb Cb Gb Db Ab Eb Bb F

Cb minor


B F# C# G# D# A# E# B# Fx Cx Gx Dx Ax Ex Bx

D# major


B F# C# G# D# A# E# B# Fx Cx Gx Dx Ax Ex Bx

E# minor


F C G D A E B F# C# G# D# A# E# B#

F# minor


B F# C# G# D# A# E# B# Fx Cx Gx Dx Ax Ex Bx

B# minor
#5
Quote by Dopey_Trout
I know it's not exactly a viable key, I'd just quite like to know. Some of the symbols you used in your post aren't showing up though


Those symbols should be double sharps. They look like a stylized x.
#6
Order of flats is Battle Ends And Down Goes Charles' Father - so Bb Eb Ab Db Gb Cb Fb Bbb Ebb etc

Major flat keys have all the flats up to and including the one in the key sig name, plus the one after - so Eb Major has Bb, Eb and Ab, Ebb Major has Bbb Ebb Abb Db Gb Cb Fb - you can work it out by just working out Eb Maj and moving every note down by a semitone (ie adding an extra flat to every note)

Order of sharps is the same but in reverse - Father Charles Goes Down And Ends Battle - or F# C# G# D# A# E# B# Fx Cx Gx etc

Major sharp keys have all the sharps up to and including the one 2 before the key sig name - so D Major has F#, C#, D# Major has Fx Cx G# D# A# E# B# - you can work it out by just working out D Maj and moving every note up by a semitone (ie adding an extra sharp to every note)

Minor keys I cheat and either work it out from the relative major, or work out the parallel major and flatten the 3rd, 6th and 7th notes (as minor = R 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7).

Dunno if that helps any but it works for me