#1
I used to be able to palm mute, and as a metal guitarist it's an important part of my playing, but why can I no longer Palm mute on my strat. It's like the bridge is in the wrong place or something?
<--- This is Wally. Not Waldo.

Gear List:
Ibanez RG570
Fender MIA Strat (in black, HSS)
Godawful Marshall MG practice amp

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#2
If you switched guitars recently, it may take getting used to the feel of the new guitar, neck scale, or new bridge. Just try doing it in different positions and keep practicing it. If you haven't switched guitars recently, then I have no idea.
#3
hes completely right, if its a new guitar its gunna take a lil while to adjust to it. but either way, palm muting is an acquired skill much like pinch harmonics, you need the right feel to do it right, since each guitar is different.
Gear:
Epiphone Viola Bass
Gibson SG Standard
Fender Strat
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Line 6 Spider 2 150 watt
Line 6 POD Xt Live
Ibanez Ts-9 Tubescreamer
#4
Quote by D&DLover
If you switched guitars recently, it may take getting used to the feel of the new guitar, neck scale, or new bridge. Just try doing it in different positions and keep practicing it. If you haven't switched guitars recently, then I have no idea.


It's a vaguely new guitar (my old one I had for 2 years). And I've played no metal on it yet, so this is a learning curve.
Just to palm mute on this, I have to tilt the whole guitar forward, yet on my friend's flying v, and my old ibanez, Palm muting is really easy.
<--- This is Wally. Not Waldo.

Gear List:
Ibanez RG570
Fender MIA Strat (in black, HSS)
Godawful Marshall MG practice amp

My Youtube
My godawful blog
#5
you fail
Gear so far:
Dean Vendetta XMT
Roland Microcube

Infiltrate the system and rot it from the inside-out.
#7
My guess is you anchor on the bridge and then shift slightly to mute. Since the bridge is different your anchoring that used to help you now hinders you because your point of reference is different. If thats right stop anchoring then relearn palm muting.

In either case anchoring isn't really good, which I just learned recently...
#8
i had the same problem a few years ago when i bought my Gretsch. First guitar ive ever had that didnt have a Strat style FR bridge, which i love. I personaly hate having the strings or bridge elevated so even playing on my Schecter is slower than using a Strat for me. Give it a week or two and you'll get used to it.
2013 Ibanez Jem 7vwh
Lakewood Sungha Jung Signature
Fender Custom Shop Stratocaster
LTD Deluxe MH-1000NT
MIA Fender Strat VG + MiJ Mustang
Martin D1 +Tayor 210e
Kremona Rondo TL Classical
Gretsch G5120
#9
Quote by Shaggy_420
you fail

Was that necessary?


Quote by battlespud
i had the same problem a few years ago when i bought my Gretsch. First guitar ive ever had that didnt have a Strat style FR bridge, which i love. I personaly hate having the strings or bridge elevated so even playing on my Schecter is slower than using a Strat for me. Give it a week or two and you'll get used to it.

Cheers. It's hurting now, but I'm getting back into the rhythm of things. Floyd Rose to non floating trem is quite an adjustment to make.
<--- This is Wally. Not Waldo.

Gear List:
Ibanez RG570
Fender MIA Strat (in black, HSS)
Godawful Marshall MG practice amp

My Youtube
My godawful blog
Last edited by vulgarmachine at Dec 22, 2009,
#10
you're probaly just getting used to it, so keep practising by playing songs with palm muted notes in and you'll find it really easy after a while. If it's still a problem try adjusting your picking technique.
#12
Flying V and Ibanez have tune-o-matic style or similar non-tremolo bridges. This makes it easy to palm mute. A strat has a tremolo bridge, so the strings run through more of a contraption. So, there is probably part of the bridge that is preventing you from making contact with the string.