#1
So, here's the deal: I have a Squier Tele Affinity Series, and I absolutely love the tone I get with my neck pick-up with the bright switch on with my Blues Deluxe. Now, unbeknownst to me at the time I bought it a few years ago, Teles' bridge p-ups are really bright. Too bright for my taste. You may be thinking "well, turn down the treble." The dilemma I'm having is that I can't find a good balance with the tone knob/EQ settings. If I turn the bright switch on my amp off or the tone knob on my guitar down, I can get a good tone with my bridge p-up, but then my neck p-up's tone suffers.

So here's where the question comes in: How should I mod my guitar to dull the tone of my bridge p-up a fair amount?

I'm planning on owning a strat sometime in life, which would suit my taste perfectly, but I think until I get out of college, I'm just going to upgrade my little Squier, as I feel like it can actually sound pretty decent if upgraded. I'm definitely going to replace the tuners and pickups at some point or another. I was thinking of a few different ideas: Either put a separate tone knob in for the bridge p-up (which would take a fair amount of cutting and wiring, which I can't do myself and don't want to pay to get done if I don't have to), or get rid of the bridge plate (and replace the bridge with a regular bridge, or possibly a tele bridge meant for a humbucker) and install a hotter, but warm (less bright) humbucker, such as a Seymour Duncan Alnico II Pro, or Pearly Gates.

tl;dr: I would like a darker and hotter tone from my bridge p-up.

Edit: Or I could just get another Tele pickup that would better suit my needs. If there is one, then that would be most convenient.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Dec 22, 2009,
#2
Ive got an SD hot rails in mine. I play through a marshall so its still pretty bright in the bridge. But it does carry more bottom end than a single coil. Its not twangy but its still bright. I think we've both got really bright sounding guitars. The only way to get round it would be to put a full size low output humbicker in the bridge. But a stacked or rails humbucker will definitley reduce the high end from the bridge
#3
Another question: Would replacing the single-coil with a humbucker complicate the wiring since it is adding wires, or is it just like replacing a humbucker in a guitar built with a humbucker already?
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Dec 22, 2009,
#4
i had the shop do it. My guitar is too import for me to mess with it. Aas far as im aware it is a direct replacement.
#5
Quote by seanchief2112
i had the shop do it. My guitar is too import for me to mess with it. Aas far as im aware it is a direct replacement.
Yeah I'd have the shop do it too. I don't even have a soldering iron. I was just wondering how much that'd cost to get done.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#6
Quote by food1010
Yeah I'd have the shop do it too. I don't even have a soldering iron. I was just wondering how much that'd cost to get done.
Buy a soldering $15 kit from Radio Shack, practice a few minutes soldering/desoldering and you'll be good to go. The only requirement - 2 opposable thumbs!

As far as the brightness, one very easy and cheap solution is a TBX Tone Control. In the mid position, it is at 10, or the TBX is bypassed. When you turn it to 10, you cut the Bass or increase the Treble. At 0, you cut the Treble and increase the Bass.

These usually come with 82.5 kOhm resistor (orange rectangle) and a 22.5 uF capacitor (orange circle).

The other option is to get a darker PU or the Humbucker that you mentioned.