#1
Hey everyone,

I just bought a Seagull Coastline S6 Burst Gloss Top. I love this guitar! Anyways, other than changing the strings, any tips to improve/protect the guitar? Thanks!
#2
If you feel like investing between $20 and $50, buy a new guitar saddle made of bone or ivory. It's the largest improvement on tone you can make on an acoustic guitar.

Congrats on the guitar, btw.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#3
To improve the guitar? Well, play it for a couple of months. That ought to be enough to enable you to identify any areas where it's in need of improvement. Maybe you won't want to change anything. Only one way to find out.

To protect it? A hard case might be worth purchasing.

A humidifier is also worth seriously considering, assuming your living room (or bedroom, or wherever the guitar spends most of its time) doesn't enjoy optimal humidity, year 'round. I prefer a room (or house) humidifier, so that no only does the guitar reap the benefits of proper humidification, but so does my skin, my throat, my furniture, etc.
--
Michael
#4
I have a hard case for it and have been keeping it in the to keep in the humidity. I think only the top is solid wood so is a humidifier necessary if I keep it in the case?

the fingerboard is rosewood so should i oil it or wait a while to do that?

Also, should I put a pick guard on it? If I put on a pcikguard will I be able to remove it in the future without damaging the finish?

Thanks
Last edited by davedavedave1 at Dec 23, 2009,
#5
a humidifier may be necessary, depending on the humidity where you live. the most important first step is to get a hygrometer - one that works. you can get one pretty cheap, and it will let you know whether your guitar needs more humidity or less. if the humidity goes under 40, your guitar will need more humidity and if it goes over 55 or 60, it needs less humidity or it can swell or mildew or both.

does the fingerboard look dry? if so, it will need a tiny bit of oil or perhaps a product for fingerboards.

will you do a lot of strumming? if so, perhaps you could choose a pickguard you really like from lmii.com or you could have a luthier add one. and you can hurt the finish of a guitar when you remove a pickguard but if you're careful and know what you're doing, it can be okay. one thing to remember is that the area covered by the pickguard may be a shade lighter when you remove it. i hear there are clear cling-on pickguards that don't use glue - maybe that would be an option, although i expect they're thinner.
#6
Deffinately the best thing would be the bone saddle. I remember people talking about it a lot over at the acoustic guitar forum (the actual Acoustic Guitar Forum not UG). Fingerboard only needs to be conditioned when it starts looking a little dry. I usually do mine every 6 months or so.
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#7
Quote by davedavedave1
I think only the top is solid wood so is a humidifier necessary if I keep it in the case?


An all solid wood guitar may be more humidity-sensitive than one with just a solid top. Maybe so. But it's still probably humidity-sensitive to some degree. Not enough moisture, and those frets will start sticking out (actually, of course, the fret ends haven't grown any longer, it's just that the wood has shrunk). At least in my limited experience, that seems to be the early warning sign of low humidity problems.

And keeping the guitar in its case doesn't really enter into it. I mean, it's not like the case creates humidity out of nothing; if the air in the room is 30% RH, and you open the case and put in the guitar, then close the case, the guitar is still being subjected to 30% RH.

I guess you could use one of those in-case or sound hole humidifiers, for the cased guitar. Personally, I don't think they're even remotely as good as just properly humidifying the room and leaving the guitar out on a stand, ready to play at all times. Moreover, I find that it's better for my skin, my nose, my throat, and my wood furniture, to humidify my home during the winter months; that my guitars benefit from this is just sort of an added bonus. With a decent room humidifier costing about as much as a few packs of guitar strings, room (or home) humidification seems like the sensible way to go. But that's just my take on it.

the fingerboard is rosewood so should i oil it or wait a while to do that?


Oil it lightly, maybe once or possibly twice per year.

Also, should I put a pick guard on it?


Your call. I have pick guards on my guitars. But depending on how you play, maybe you just don't need one.

If I put on a pcikguard will I be able to remove it in the future without damaging the finish?


Perhaps. But even if the finish isn't damaged by the removal, it's very possible that the wood underneath the pick guard will be a different shade from the wood that wasn't protected by the pick guard, just due to exposure to light and so forth.

If you're really undecided about whether to use a pick guard, bear in mind that there are transparent pick guards available. Maybe one of them would be more to your liking.
--
Michael
Last edited by 123Michael321 at Dec 23, 2009,
#8
Ok thanks for all your advice.

When I changed the strings I noticed a buzzing. This was not the case prior. It feels as if the strings are a bit looser, so I thought maybe my tuning was off. However, I checked it with a digital tuner and it was fine. Could it be that the bridgepins are not in properly?
#9
Sometimes you get a little string buzzing with new strings. Person recommendation would be to give the strings a few days worth of playing and see if it gets better. You might have changed string gagues from what it originally was, which can cause buzzing and you might need to make some adjustments in the truss rod and/or action.

Its probably not the bridgepins unless they are sticking up higher than they were before.
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#10
Quote by 123Michael321
Perhaps. But even if the finish isn't damaged by the removal, it's very possible that the wood underneath the pick guard will be a different shade from the wood that wasn't protected by the pick guard, just due to exposure to light and so forth.

If you're really undecided about whether to use a pick guard, bear in mind that there are transparent pick guards available. Maybe one of them would be more to your liking.
--
Michael


As long as the pickguard was put on properly, and the person taking it off knows what they're doing, it shouldn't get damaged at all.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#11
Eh, don't worry about the strings buzzing. They're just fresh and will take a bit to stiffen up. However, if you want to prevent fret buzz with new strings, get a new bridge installed that will give you a higher action.
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